Tuberculosis

They hide things like that from us. The Hidden Epidemic Amongst Former Miners: Silicosis, Tuberculosis and the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

The aim of the research was to assess current and historical surveillance of the pneumoconioses in former miners, in particular silicosis, silico-tuberculosis, and tuberculosis, and to assess the functioning of the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act (ODMWA) surveillance and compensation system which is a responsibility of the Department of Health. The research also aimed to assess the impact of the burden of lung disease and disability on the public health system and on the labour-sending communities from which the miners come and to which they return.

Thousands of lives lost in treatment delays

More than 330,000 lives were lost to HIV/AIDS in South Africa between 2000 and 2005 because a feasible and timely antiretroviral (ARV) treatment program was not implemented, according to researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health. The study was published online by the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (JAIDS). In addition, an estimated 35,000 babies were born with HIV during that same period in the country because a feasible mother-to-child transmission prophylaxis program using nevirapine (an anti-AIDS drug) was not implemented, the authors write. The paper estimates the consequences of the HIV/AIDS policies followed by the South African government for a five-year period when neighboring countries ramped up their HIV-prevention programs. The paper may have broader implications for the evaluation of consequences of public health programs.

Lack of medical workers plagues developing countries

When her baby turned blue, Nivetha Biju rushed the child to the emergency room of an Indian hospital and watched helplessly as the baby lost consciousness because the nurses on duty had no idea what to do. Eventually a doctor saved the baby's life, but many patients are not so lucky in India and in other developing countries where a scarcity of doctors and trained nurses means there is often no helping hand in times of need. Health systems [in developing countries] are on the brink of collapse due to the lack of skilled personnel, said Ezekiel Nukuro, an official with the World Health Organization. In some countries, deaths from preventable diseases are rising and life expectancy is dropping, he said.

Not enough research to treat TB-HIV properly, say experts Anso Thom

Health systems cannot properly diagnose, treat, or contain the co-epidemic of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) because not enough is known about how the two diseases interact. A report by leading global health experts warned that the largely unnoticed collision of the global epidemics of HIV and TB has exploded to create a deadly co-epidemic that is rapidly spreading in sub-Saharan Africa.

Towards a generic surveillance system to measure the impact of Community Health Worker programmes in South Africa: a comparison of paper-based and mobile/cell phone methods

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

The emergence of Human Immune Virus (HIV) infections and the Acquired Immune Defi ciency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in South Africa accompanied by an upsurge in the number of reported tuberculosis (TB) cases has profoundly altered the nations disease profi le over the last fi fteen years. This resulted in a change in the presentation of health problems and a deterioration of health indicators, i.e. increased mortality- and morbidity rates, with a lowered life expectancy.

Stretched health system leaves home care as only alternative

Facilities and staff are being stretched beyond capacity as Swaziland 's public healthcare system buckles under a surge of HIV/AIDS patients, leaving many with home-based care (HBC) as the only alternative, says a new report.

Global Fund risks Medicines without Doctors if it doesnt finance health sector scale-up

A team of international health experts this week warned the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria: fund the salaries of health workers or else risk a situation in which medicines for these three diseases are made available in poor countries but there are no health professionals to deliver them.

The District Health Barometer - Year 2005/06

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

The District Health Barometer (DHB) supports district managers with monitoring and evaluation of district performance and with their annual District Health Plans. It translates routinely collected service level data into information that supports effortless interpretation which leads to engagement.

The report compares key health indicators between the six metropolitan districts, between the 13 rural node districts and between all the districts throughout the country. Analysis of this carefully selected range of health indicators, facilitates identification of problem areas and the corresponding corrective measures. Inequities between rural and urban areas are addressed throughout the report.