counselling

HIV and adolescents: Guidance for HIV testing and counselling and care for adolescents living with HIV

Published by: 
World Health Organization

Adolescents (10–19 years) and young people (20–24 years) continue to be vulnerable, both socially and economically, to HIV infection despite efforts to date. This is particularly true for adolescents — especially girls — who live in settings with a generalized HIV epidemic or who are members of key populations at higher risk for HIV acquisition or transmission through sexual transmission and injecting drug use. In 2012, there were approximately 2.1 million adolescents living with HIV. About one-seventh of all new HIV infections occur during adolescence.

Treatment 2015

Published by: 
UNAIDS

The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has launched a new framework to accelerate action in reaching 15 million people with antiretroviral treatment by 2015––the goal set by United Nations Member States in 2011. 

The framework, entitled Treatment 2015, offers countries and partners both practical and innovative ways to increase the number of people accessing antiretroviral medicines. These medicines will not only enable people living with HIV to live longer and healthier lives, they will also help prevent new HIV infections.

New guidelines for counselling and testing children for HIV

Published by: 
Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

A new set of guidelines and training tools dealing with the legal, ethical and counselling issues related to HIV testing of children is now available for HIV/AIDS practitioners working with children.

Dr Heidi van Rooyen, project team leader and research director at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), explains: “These guidelines explore in simple and practical terms the psychosocial implications as well as the legal and policy obligations relating to HIV counselling and testing of children.

“The tools describe what practitioners can do to ensure that HIV testing of children takes place in a way that protects and promotes their rights and is conducted in their best interests."

Medical Male Circumcision: thinking through the impact for a feminised epidemic

Series Name: 
Nursing Update
Published by: 
Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa
Marion Stevens of the Health Systems Trust focuses on the recent meetings and discussion around medical male circumcision.

There has been a lot of discussion and a lot of resource mobilisation (donors setting money aside) on medical male circumcision. This has been so given recent research findings and the desperate need to find 'something' to do to increase real results in the prevention, treatment and care, and support arena. However, concerns have been expressed about the real implications. The World Health Organization (WHO) held a meeting in Mombasa last month to discuss this issue and the Aids Vaccine Advocacy Coalition held a meeting prior to this to particularly focus on growing concerns regarding the impact of medical male circumcision on an epidemic in which women are mostly infected and affected. I include a background document and a consensus statement from the meeting.

The Pocket Guide To Effective Communication

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

This pocket booklet is aimed at providing a quick reference for the busy health professional to some of the more frequently used tools in effective business communication. Keep it in a place where you can access it quickly in a time of need such as before an important presentation or writing a report.

Introduction

The Integration of HIV/AIDS Care and Support into Primary Health Care in Gauteng Province

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
This study aimed to assess the integration of HIV/AIDS care and support in Gautengs primary health care (PHC) services. With this aim in mind, the research sought to provide answers to three main sets of questions. Firstly, are care and support services for people with HIV/AIDS being provided at PHC clinics, what is the quality of these services, and to what extent are these services being utilised? Secondly, are the inputs (e.g. staff knowledge and attitudes) and support systems (e.g. drug supplies), necessary for good quality, accessible HIV/AIDS care, present in the PHC infrastructure? Thirdly, what if any, systems changes are required to improve the access and quality of PHC services for people living with HIV/AIDS? This research was conducted in collaboration with, and partly funded by, the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health which is in the process of disseminating primary health care clinical guidelines in the Province.

Focus on HIV/AIDS and STDs

Series Name: 
HST Update
Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
So often, with the doom and gloom attitude by which HIV and AIDS is portrayed in our newspapers, it is easy for us to feel despondent. Yet there is some good news. There are things we as health workers can do that can make a real difference. Good sex and life skills health promotion is an essential component to promoting healthy behaviour. A multi-centre study undertaken by the World Health Organisation has conclusively shown that such education does not encourage promiscuity. In fact it is seen to delay the onset of first sexual activity. Recent research from KwaZulu-Natal has also shown that most parents are in support of such sex education for their children. This dispels some of the myths that have jeopardised some health promotion initiatives in the past.