Health care

Local Government Transformation - A guide for health workers

Volume: 
1
Series Name: 
Kwik Skwiz
Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
This Kwik-Skwiz aims to provide an overview of the current situation and future changes in local government. This will assist anyone working within the health sector to understand the changes and to contribute to the transformation process. The overview describes the new responsibilities allocated to local government, the methods being developed to enable local government to function more efficiently, the demarcation process, the new types of municipalities to be introduced, and the changing relationship between local government and the health sector.

The development of the District Health System in South Africa: Lessons Learned from the Experience of ISDS: Technical Report 5

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

Will districts become effective vehicles for improving the quality of care, or expensive paper-shuffling machines? Will district management teams walk an interminable treadmill, or slowly, but surely improve the quality of care? These are the niggling and uncomfortable questions that motivate participants in the Initiative for Sub-District Support (ISDS).

Over the past year, the ISDS has tried to develop systematic processes of support to management teams in selected districts in South Africa, aimed at strengthening their ability to improve the quality of health care. Through this experience, we hope to be able to share lessons with other districts to create a positive spin-off effect, demonstrate the process of district development, and pinpoint persistent obstacles.

Transport management: A key component of effective health care

Volume: 
1
Series Name: 
Kwik Skwiz
Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

Step-by-step approach to implementing an effective transport management system.Transport is not only an expensive resource, but is also critical to effective health care delivery. A lack of transport and the poor use of existing vehicles can lead to problems such as poor supplies of drugs to clinics, inadequate supervision of clinic staff, difficulties in referring patients between facilities, infrequent visits to schools by the school health team, and a lack of community outreach health services or mobile clinic services. The ISDS experience suggests that it is imperative for district health services to focus on developing good management for transport.

Annual Report 1999

Series Name: 
HST Annual Report
Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
The Health Systems Trust continues to make a unique and important contribution to health development in our country. One of the main goals of the Trust is to support the implementation of health policies and strategies aimed at promoting equity, and in the past year, the staff have supported this goal through the development of innovative approaches to the promotion of health equity, and the competent maintenance of the established programmes of the Trust.

Measuring the move towards equity - from the site of service delivery

Series Name: 
Facilities Survey
Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
It is important that policies and strategies towards equity in service provision are measured in terms of their impact on health service delivery. This would begin to demonstrate the practical impact of health reform.

In an attempt to measure in part the progress (or lack of progress) towards equity one step would be to measure the quality of service provision at the community (primary care) level. This would give an overview of the disparities between as well as in provinces, and between rural, urban and peri-urban parts of the country.

South African Health Review 1996

Series Name: 
South African Health Review
Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

The South African Health Review 1996 documents the degree to which structural reform and policy formulation within the health sector has translated into real improvements in service delivery and the quality of peoples lives. In sum, the Review reveals a mixed scorecard. Progress has been excellent in some areas, whereas others show little movement. This, the Review argues, is the nature of health reform.