Immunodeficiency

Progress report 2011: Global HIV/AIDS response

Published by: 
UNAIDS, UNICEF and WHO

The Progress report 2011: Global HIV/AIDS response reviews progress made until the end of 2010 in scaling up access to health sector interventions for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support in low–and middle-income countries.

It is the fifth in a series of annual progress reports published since 2006 by WHO, UNICEF and UNAIDS, in collaboration with national and international partners, to monitor key components of the health sector response to the HIV epidemic.

Combination HIV Prevention: Tailoring and Coordinating Biomedical, Behavioural and Structural Strategies to Reduce New HIV Infections.

Published by: 
UNAIDS

This discussion paper summarizes the approach to HIV prevention programming known as “combination prevention” that UNAIDS recommends to achieve the greatest and most lasting impact on reducing HIV incidence and on improving the well-being of affected communities around the world.

DOHA+10 TRIPS flexibilities and access to antiretroviral therapy: lessons from the past, opportunities for the future

Published by: 
UNAIDS

The transformation of HIV from almost cer¬tain death to a chronic condition for many people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries is a significant public health achievement. By the end of 2010, 6.6 million people in low- and middle-income countries – 47% of the total number eligible – had access to antiretrovi¬ral therapy. This represents a dramatic increase from the 300 000 (2.7% of those eli¬gible) on antiretroviral therapy in 2002. This remarkably effective scaling up of access to antiretroviral therapy has been, in large part, due to a drastic fall in antiretroviral drug prices during this period. In 2000, three-drug antiretroviral therapy combinations cost US$ 10 000–15 000 per person, per year.

World AIDS Day Report | 2011

Published by: 
UNAIDS

A new report by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has been released and shows that 2011 was a game changing year for the AIDS response with unprecedented progress in science, political leadership and results. The report also shows that new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths have fallen to the lowest levels since the peak of the epidemic. New HIV infections were reduced by 21% since 1997, and deaths from AIDS-related illnesses decreased by 21% since 2005.

Global AIDS Response Progress Reporting 2012

Published by: 
UNAIDS

In order to help countries produce standardized reports to effectively measure the state of the epidemic, UNAIDS has released the new guidelines on Global AIDS Response Progress Reporting 2012. The guidelines outline a set of core global indicators designed to help countries assess the current state of their national AIDS response and progress made in achieving their national HIV targets. They will contribute to a better understanding of the global AIDS response, including progress towards meeting the global targets set in the 2011 Political Declaration as well as the Millennium Development Goals.

UNESCO’s Strategy for HIV and AIDS

Published by: 
UNESCO

There has been considerable progress across the world in responding to HIV and AIDS. Yet, the number of people newly infected with HIV continues to rise in many countries, and AIDS is still a leading cause of adult mortality. Treatment has become more widely available, but the costs for individuals and countries remain signifi cant, and the sustainability of treatment is a serious concern.

HIV and Infant Feeding

Published by: 
UNAIDS, UNICEF and WHO

A Policy Statement.

The number of infants born with HIV infection is growing every day. The AIDS pandemic represents a tragic setback in the progress made on child welfare and survival. Given the vital importance of breast milk and breast- feeding for child health, the increasing prevalence of HIV infection around the world, and the evidence of a risk of HIV transmission through breast-feeding, it is now crucial that policies be developed on HIV infection and infant feeding.

The following statement provides policy-makers with a number of key elements for the formulation of such policies.

Getting to Success: Improving HIV Prevention Efforts in South Africa

Published by: 
South African National AIDS Council (SANAC)

The purpose of this work is to assist South Africa in improving its HIV prevention response. In 2011, the South African government has the challenging task to draw up a new 5-year strategy: the National HIV Strategic Plan 2012 to 2016. This plan is to provide strategic direction on how to respond to HIV and AIDS in South Africa in the next five years. With the annual rate of new HIV infections down to the level of the early 1990s, a slower spread of HIV infection in teenagers, ARV provision at high levels, and promising new HIV prevention tools becoming available, these five years represent a window of opportunity to radically turn around the epidemic by significantly putting the brakes on new infections in the country.

Securing the future today: Synthesis of Strategic Information on HIV and Young People

Published by: 
UNAIDS

This report shows that these global commitments will be achieved only if the unique needs of young women and men are acknowledged, and their human rights fulfilled, respected, and protected. In order to reduce new HIV infections among young people, achieve the broader equity goals set out in the MDGs, and begin to reverse the overall HIV epidemic, HIV prevention and treatment efforts must be tailored to the specific needs of young people.

Achieving sexual and reproductive health and rights for women and girls through the HIV response

Published by: 
UNAIDS

The case studies that follow, from across sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Europe and Central
Asia, Latin America and North America, highlight the rich diversity of community initiatives that
bridge sexual and reproductive health and rights and HIV. The report has a strategic emphasis
on the innovation that is being led by women living with HIV and features pioneering endeavours
that reflect community and key stakeholder interpretation and understanding of how this
intersection is defined. It profiles initiatives that have emerged from within the HIV sector as it
broadens out to encompass a sexual and reproductive health and rights approach, as well as