Northern Cape Province

Windows of Opportunity Project: Review and Analysis of Maternal and Child Health Development Data for Four Project Districts in South Africa

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust

Up to half a million African babies die on the day they are born, and every year 1.16 million babies die in the first month of life while another one million babies are stillborn. In addition, about 250 000 women die of pregnancy-related causes every year in Africa. The majority of these deaths are preventable. However due to factors such as critical shortage of health professionals and essential materials and infrastructure, ineffective intervention programmes as well as the impact of the HIV and AIDS epidemic, the Africa continent continues to lose millions of babies and mothers every year. Hence, there is a need to strengthen the health systems in many African countries through effective maternal and child health (MCH) intervention programmes.

Transport for Health Care Delivery

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
The lack of transport to ensure timeous transfer of patients between levels of health care facilities and for delivery of medicines, vaccines, and other essential equipment is a commonly heard cry from health workers, particularly from those working in rural areas, but is often overlooked and rarely researched. It is essential to have the correct vehicle mix and a sound transport management system to ensure efficient and effective health service delivery. Public sector transport policies and management systems in South Africa are complex. Policy decisions for the management of the national fleet are set by the national Department of Transport, remote from the level of service delivery. The provincial departments of Transport lease vehicles for service delivery to user departments, such as the Department of Health. A Fleet Management Service Provider is contracted to the national Department of Transport to coordinate fuel and oil purchases and maintenance of the national fleet. Management of the national fleet has been identified by the national Department of Transport (NDoT) as not being part of the core business of the department. The policy direction of the NDoT is to outsource the management of the national fleet, (as has been done in the Northern Cape Province), and improve the subsidised car scheme for public servants. How these policy decisions will affect health service delivery is not known, particularly within a decentralised health system. This chapter explores some of the complexities of the present transport management systems for health service delivery within the public sector through three provincial case studies, namely Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Gauteng. Some recommendations for improved management and for further research are made.

Health care in the Northern Cape: implications for planning 1996

Published by: 
Health Systems Trust
The report is intended for health managers in the Northern Cape Province managers at provincial level but especially for regional managers as the information is set out in a format which defines and compares the resources and services of the six regions. The information was obtained from ReHMIS (Regional Health Management Information System) by the Northen Cape ReHMIS team. Some additional sources of information were also used. Data was collected from all public (provincial and local authority) health facilities on the basis of standardised national definitions.