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Political commitment to sustained and predictable investment in a robust HIV science agenda must be strengthened.
2017-07-192017-07-20 12:00 AMIAS 2017http://www.ias2017.org/The-Paris-Statement-HIV-Science-Matters
  
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  <div>In remembrance of Nkosi Johnson, written by Health Systems Trust's Head of Business Development and Communications, Innocent Nkata&#58;<br><br>This month we remember Xolani Nkosi aka Nkosi Johnson, the South African boy whose story left an indelible mark in the fight against HIV. Nkosi was born with HIV on 4 February 1989, at a time when the South African government was still denying the reality of HIV, refusing to provide life-saving drugs. Nkosi became a devoted activist for the rights of children living with HIV. Delivering the keynote speech at the 13th International AIDS Conference, he remarked&#58;<br><br>&quot;Care for us and accept us — we are all human beings. We are normal. We have hands. We have feet. We can walk, we can talk, we have needs just like everyone else—don't be afraid of us — we are all the same!&quot;<br><br>Nkosi lost his battle with HIV on 1 June 2001 at the age of 12. We have come a long way since then. Today, 3.4 million people are on antiretroviral therapy in South Africa alone; globally, new HIV infections among children are down from 490 000 to 150 000. But even one child born with HIV is still one too many. Although Nkosi was posthumously awarded the International Children's Peace Prize, the ultimate tribute to his life will be to bring down the number of children born with HIV to zero.<br><br>Thank you Nkosi for your life so sadly cut short but you left us a legacy and in your name we shall fight until HIV is history.</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-06-012017-06-23 12:00 AMLinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6275953973677694976/">https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6275953973677694976
  
Article

  <div>South Africa has a dire shortage of registered nurses, yet those wanting to enter the profession are now finding a closed door.<br><br>The pipeline of registered nurses in South Africa has ‘paused’ – and hospitals and students are being affected by legislative bungles halting the flow of skills into the sector. To add fuel to the fire, working conditions discourage retention.<br>The sequence of events is startling, especially for a country where, according to Moneyweb calculations and South African Nursing Council (SANC) statistics, there were only 5.14 nurses per 1 000 people in 2016.<br><br>Dr Wilmot James, DA shadow minister of health, notes in his Politicsweb article here&#58; “Having a critical mass of professional nurses in hospitals reduces the risk of patients dying by 8%.” It also significantly cuts the incidence of patients acquiring additional health problems while in hospital.<br><br>“We have a significant shortage of qualified professional nurses,” says Debbie Regensberg from the Society of Private Nurse Practitioners of SA. “And the shortage is about to become critical.”</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-06-012017-06-23 12:00 AMMoneyWebhttps://www.moneyweb.co.za/news/industry/alarming-bureaucratic-bungling-has-potentially-deadly-consequences-for-us-all
  
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  <div>You did it. And when the celebrations began after your election as Director-General of WHO last week, it seemed so obvious that you would. You have high-level political experience, you made major contributions to strengthening Ethiopia's health system, and you are adept at navigating the treacherous waters of international health politics. The debates you took part in, the public scrutiny of your manifesto, and the transparency of the election process have not only strengthened WHO's reputation, but also enhanced your legitimacy. You begin your term of office with more political capital than any Director-General I can recall. So what do you do with it? Some have said that it's in Africa that WHO's performance will be judged. That's a nice sentiment. But it is wrong. WHO is a global institution, and you now represent the world, not Africa alone. One weakness of democracy is that it encourages candidates for office to make big promises. You made several—delivering universal health coverage, protecting countries from health emergencies, strengthening the front-line work of WHO, transforming WHO into a world-class institution, and putting accountability at the heart of the agency's culture. Yet, as you acknowledged&#58; “It's going to be tough.”<br><br>You will receive much wise advice. You already have a transition team. You have time to think before you take up your appointment on July 1. What follows isn't advice. It's simply a few reflections on what might make the difference between success and failure. First, it's not all about you. You will be Director-General of WHO. But your success depends on the quality of the team you appoint—your deputy, your chief-of-staff, your assistant director-generals, and your directors. Your predecessors have sometimes resented sharing the limelight with colleagues. They have criticised senior staff for seeking to advance their own agendas. They have succumbed to trading jobs for favours. Don't repeat their mistakes. Appoint the best and most respected people you can find. Promote and celebrate their successes. Love your staff. It is their work that will rejuvenate WHO's role in global health. Second, think strategically. You can't do everything. Choose a limited number of objectives to achieve during the next 5 years. Third, don't waste the goodwill you begin with on more WHO reform. It will sap your strength, drag you into endless debates about process, and pander to those who already hate multilateral institutions. Instead, use what you have—an influential network of regional and country offices—to translate your values and priorities into tangible actions and results. Finally, stick to your deepest and most heartfelt principles. You said last week that health is a rights issue. Indeed, it is. Challenge every Head of State to make it so.<br><br>You take over WHO at a difficult moment in its history. Ebola left the agency bruised and apologetic. You must rebuild trust and confidence in the organisation. That means recognising WHO's special strengths. There are three. Science. Evidence is a political instrument. The global health research community is your friend. Use us. Make us part of WHO's wider work. We may not always agree with you. But science and the accumulation of reliable knowledge are a powerful means of resistance to the forces that undermine health. Convening power. Whatever the critics of global institutions might say—and they are today in the ascendancy—WHO's ability to use its moral leadership to accelerate progress on health remains undiluted. Your predecessors have often been risk averse in leading the international community. The mantra of serving member states has made the agency fearful, defensive, overcautious, reactive, weak, craven, timid, unimaginative, pusillanimous, and even paranoid. Be courageous. The voice of the voiceless. Politics—and health—is about people. WHO represents those who have no voice. When you are told why something isn't possible, why it's more complicated than it seems, why you shouldn't say or do something, remember those who depend on you to improve their lives. Finally, the spectre of an appalling terrorist attack in Manchester, UK, hung over your election last week. But that episode, and the violence that occurs every day in every nation, held within it an important truth—that the protection and advance of human civilisation depends on inextricable linkages between peace and security, development and health. WHO is more than a health agency. It stands for the possibility of human perfection. Believe in that vision. And hold all of us accountable for delivering it.</br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-292017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)31503-9/fulltext
  
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Government has been advised not to decriminalise sex work in the very week that a special clinic for sex workers and drug users was opened in Cape Town. Charlene was eight when her mother died. She ended up in an orphanage called ‘Ons Plek’ but had to leave once she turned 18. “I had nowhere to go. I didn’t know about living on the street. A friend told me that she knew how to make a quick buck. ‘A quick buck,’ I thought. ‘OK. I know...
2017-05-292017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/29/sex-workers-remain-criminals/
  
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  <div>Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus Adhanom is the first African to become the director-general of the World Health Organisation (WHO). He is also the first non-physician to head up the United Nations’ body.<br><br>He has big challenges ahead of him.<br><br>He will be expected use his formidable talents – including diplomacy – to boost the WHO’s image and finances, protect it against the whimsical policies of superpowers, and keep the organisation free of commercial influences.<br><br>Dr Tedros has already prioritised improving universal health coverage. As he put it&#58;<br><br>All roads should lead to universal health coverage. I will not rest until we have met this.<br><br>To achieve this, he will need to strengthen health systems. But the challenge he faces is that the responsibility for strengthening health systems is different in different contexts, and it seldom falls directly to the WHO.<br><br>Such efforts are often driven by funders’ priorities. And for countries that don’t rely on external resources, such as China and India, investments in health systems tend to reflect domestic social sector policy and priorities.<br><br>It’s therefore worth asking&#58; what can the WHO, or more specifically the DG, do to advance the health systems agenda? Here are three ideas that could be usefully pursued to achieve the outcome the DG desires.</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-262017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/three-ideas-on-how-the-new-who-dg-can-build-health-systems-from-the-bottom-up-78412
  
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  <div>LIMPOPO – While the number of patients reporting to clinics and hospitals with malaria in Mopani is dropping, the provincial health department remains concerned as the battle to end the current outbreak continues.<br><br>Education and awareness campaigns are ongoing as winter sets in and temperatures drop, causing mosquitoes to die out.<br><br>The area has been hard-hit by a malaria outbreak that saw 1200 cases of malaria in April alone, with the May figure now approaching 800 cases.<br><br>Singer Yvonne Chaka Chaka, the United Nations special ambassador on malaria, recently visited the area during the Limpopo Department of Health’s malaria awareness campaign in Dzumeri village, which falls under the Greater Giyani Municipality in Mopani District.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-252017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/25/malaria-tally-2000-since-april/
  
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  <div>WHO’s budget has been problematic for years, to say the least. While voluntary contributions to the organization have been increasing, a huge bulk of it, over 80 percent, has largely been earmarked to a limited set of programs, leaving others such as the new health emergencies program to suffer from underfunding. In 2016, outgoing Director-General Margaret Chan reprioritized $130 million in funding for the program to ensure it “doesn’t go under.”<br><br>Tedros has repeatedly mentioned the need to expand the WHO’s donor base, and he reiterated this during his first press conference as the newly elected director-general on Wednesday at Palais des Nations in Geneva, where the current 70th World Health Assembly is held. WHO’s funding unit requires upsizing in terms of size and skills of human resources, he said. WHO should look into what it can learn from other United Nations agencies, such as UNICEF, on the issue of fundraising.<br><br>But he also emphasized the need to look at a “bigger envelope.”<br><br>“When we talk about budget issue, most of the time we raise the WHO budget only. But that’s not the right way of thinking about financing [the] Global Health Agenda,” he told a packed room of journalists.<br><br>WHO, he said, is the “leader of the global health agenda” and therefore should look at raising funding not just for its own programs, but also for multilateral institutions such as the World Bank, GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, and the Global Fund to Fight HIV and AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, whose programs help fill gaps in health financing and service delivery in countries.</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-252017-06-23 12:00 AM
  
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  <div>Stunted kids grow into fat adults, indicative of a nutritional crisis government does not know how to address. Are there no champions for NCDs because they mostly affect women, the old and fat?<br><br>Over a quarter of South African pre-school kids are stunted, their development arrested by poor nutrition.<br><br>This early hunger will dog them as adults where, ironically, they will be prone to becoming overweight – both because poorer households survive on cheap, carbohydrate-based food and because their deprived childhoods have primed their bodies to store food as fat in preparation for famine.<br><br>As overweight adults, they will be ambushed by “lifestyle diseases” – diabetes (type 2), hypertension, strokes, heart attacks and cancer.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-222017-06-23 12:00 AM
  
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  <div>The Healthcare Access and Quality Index rates SA high on diptheria but low on TB; but developed countries, such as Norway and Australia, are not getting it right either<br><br>The number of people dying from curable illnesses is &quot;disturbing&quot;‚ a new global study has found. While significant gains have been made in the past 25 years‚ the study found &quot;massive inequity of access and quality healthcare&quot;.<br><br>The study is authored by Dr Christopher Murray‚ director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. It was published on Friday in the international medical journal‚ The Lancet.<br><br>The study says SA’s healthcare system ranks high in addressing common vaccine-preventable diseases‚ with a score of 98 out of 100 in addressing diphtheria and 95 for tetanus. However‚ in other categories the nation has much lower scores‚ such as tuberculosis (TB) and lower respiratory infections, which both score 24.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-192017-06-23 12:00 AMBusinesslivehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-19-people-still-dying-from-curable-diseases--but-sa-ranks-quite-high/
  
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  <div>KWA-ZULU NATAL – Traditional healers in KwaZulu Natal have been trained by the provincial Department of Health (DoH) to counsel, examine and test their patients impacted by HIV/Aids and TB.<br><br>This is the result of a collaboration between the Department and an NGO that works in the field of health and HIV/Aids. iTEACH – the Integration of TB and Education and Care for HIV – together with the DoH, has trained over 400 traditional healers to recognize patients who have TB and HIV symptoms.<br><br>The training, carried out at Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, now enables traditional healrs to do basic screening and confirmation tests and then refer the patient on to their nearest hospital or clinic for medical treatment.</br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-182017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/18/kzn-traditional-healers-test-counsel-hiv-tb-patients
  
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  <div>Cosatu accuses the health minister of betraying voters by offering medical schemes a lifelineHealth Minister Aaron Motsoaledi moved on Tuesday to defend his position on National Health Insurance (NHI) after Cosatu accused him of betraying voters by offering medical schemes a lifeline.<br><br>The NHI white paper released in 2015 says a single NHI fund should be established to pay for services and relegates medical schemes to providing &quot;complementary&quot; services.<br><br>Health director-general Precious Matsoso and Motsoaledi have recently signalled a potentially softer approach, in which medical schemes would continue to exist.<br><br>At the weekend, Motsoaledi said medical schemes would need to consolidate and reduce the number of options they offered, but they would play a role in the transition to NHI.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
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2017-05-172017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-17-aaron-motsoaledi-deflects-attack-by-cosatu-on-national-health-scheme/
  
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Three Durban restaurateurs arrested by the Hawks, accused of selling places to study at the University of KwaZulu Natal‘s medical school for up to half a million rand a spot, have been released on bail. The expanding investigation may encompass another SA medical school.

Varsha, 44, Hitesh Bhatt, 46, and co-accused Preshni Hiraman, 54, made a brief court appearance inPinetown Magistrate’s Court. after their arrests on Friday, reports The Mercury.

The couple run a popular, internationally rated restaurant, Little Gujarat, in the Durban CBD.

The trio face charges of corruption for allegedly selling spaces at the Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine and other health science places at the university for a fee of between R250 000 and R500 000.

The racket was exposed by the Sunday Tribune.
2017-05-172017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/hawks-widen-investigation-sa-medical-school-places-sale/
  
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  <div>South Africa, along with India, Russia and the Philippines, will over the next two decades face dramatically rising rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), according to research from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).<br><br>Using data on outcomes and impacts of tuberculosis across four countries with some of the highest rates of the disease, researchers from the CDC found indications that person-to-person transmission will drive rising rates of TB that does not respond to treatments of first and second resort over the next two decades.</br></br></div>
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2017-05-172017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/cdc-modelling-study-sounds-warning-tb-sa/
  
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The City of Johannesburg is launching an emergency measles vaccination campaign following after 11 cases of the the illness have been reported in Gauteng. In South Africa, children should be vaccinated against measles at nine & 18 months The drive is set to start on Monday, and will target children between 6 months and 15 years old. The announcement was made in a statement warning residents to be cautious of a possible outbreak of measles this winter season after 11...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/15/emergency-vaccination-campaign-curb-measles-outbreak-gauteng/
  
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Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi says he will present a revised version of the National Health Insurance (NHI) white paper to a cabinet subcommittee on Tuesday. If the subcommittee approves the blueprint, it will then be considered by the Cabinet. If the Cabinet approves the plans, the legislative process to enact the policy will begin. A key aspect that will be scrutinised is the future role of SA’s medical schemes and administrators. The paper...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-15-why-the-nhi-may-take-softer-approach/
  
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The Trump administration on Monday significantly expanded a Reagan-era policy banning foreign aid to international healthcare providers who discuss abortion or advocate for abortion rights, in a move critics fear will jeopardize efforts to fight diseases such as malaria, HIV/Aids, and the Zika virus. The new terms of the ban will apply to $8.8bn in existing foreign aid provided by the state department, USAid, and the Department of Defense – dwarfing the $600m in...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/15/trump-abortion-rule-mexico-city-policy
  
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There is absolutely no evidence that young women are deliberately falling pregnant in order to access the child support grant, Statistician-General Pali Lehohla said on Monday as he released the findings of the South Africa Demographic and Health Survey (SADHS) 2016. The study found that the teenage pregnancy rate had remained virtually the same between 1998 and 2016 at 71 per 1,000 women. "There is a notion that grants influence young girls to produce...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-15-survey-finds-teenage-girls-do-not-get-pregnant-for-grants/
  
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One in 10 of Mpumalanga’s children under the age of two has not had any of the shots required under the government’s childhood immunisation programme, according to the South Africa Demographic Health Survey (DHMS) 2016 released on Monday by Statistics SA. The finding signals potentially deadly weaknesses in the childhood immunisation programme, as inadequate coverage of the population increases the likelihood of disease outbreaks. Both Gauteng and the Western...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-15-one-in-10-mpumalanga-toddlers-not-immunised-data-reveal/
  
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Hundreds of medication errors are made in children’s wards at one of the country’s leading hospitals. Pharmacists who spent 16 weeks in the four paediatric wards at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Ga-Rankuwa‚ Gauteng‚ detected 663 medication errors — an average of 2.9 per patient. The biggest category of errors involved incorrect dosing‚ followed by omission of medication and medicine being given at the wrong time. A total of 106 errors were made...
2017-05-142017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Live https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2017-05-14-the-great-drugs-bungle-how-hospital-doctors-and-nurses-put-kids-at-risk/
  
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The Department of Health has done a U-turn on its plan to scrap medical aid schemes, saying they should work with the state when it rolls out National Health Insurance instead.   Department director-general Precious Matsoso met leaders of the medical aid plan sector and asked that they work together to reform healthcare in South Africa. "This is big news," said Graham Anderson, principal officer of Profmed.
2017-05-112017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Live http://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2017/05/11/Climbdown-on-medical-aids
  
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The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been one of the great public health success stories of the past 40 years. ART has led to increased survival in people living with HIV, and subsequently to individual and societal gains worldwide, because of the marked improvements in its potency, side-effect profile, and simplicity of use.1 Results from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 study have clearly proven the efficacy of ART for prevention of transmission,...
2017-05-102017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30086-3/fulltext
  
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Embattled hospitals across the Eastern Cape – where health services have been shoddy and people reliant on state healthcare have been driven to protest action – will be receiving a welcome boost in resources. The Eastern Cape Health Department has put aside R14.4-billion to recruit medical specialists and general workers to fill vacancies in over 300 public health facilities across the province.
2017-05-102017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/10/r14-4-billion-eastern-cape-health/
  
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Pumpkin leaves, sweet potatoes, Hugo beans, baby black jacks and wild fruits have been rejected in favour of a more westernised diet of processed meats, fast food and oily treats leading to a host of health problems. Mkhulu Macingwane Mchunu (85) works in his garden where he grows the vegetables he believes are keeping him healthy and strong. (Credit: Sandile Ndlovu / Health-e) Durban dietician Raeesa Seedat says fruit and vegetables are high in vitamins, minerals,...
2017-05-092017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/09/heavy-impact-urban-diets/
  
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SA’s grandmothers are breadwinners in their old age, and their inability to access decent healthcare quickly impacts on their children, grandchildren and their entire communities. Six elderly women sit inside a corrugated iron shack in the Ngangelizwe township in Mthatha, a region with among the highest poverty rates in the Eastern Cape, to share their stories. Like many South African grandmothers, they have become, in their old age, their families’ breadwinners,...
2017-05-082017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/08/no-time-emergencies/
  
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A pregnant woman, who was sent home after arriving at her local clinic with severe abdominal pains, gave birth to a healthy baby girl in the street a short while later.
2017-05-032017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/03/limpopo-woman-gives-birth-street/
  
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Researchers have shown that monetary incentives lead to infants being immunised on time. Doreen Auma puffs as her stride shortens with every step. The humidity is thick and sticky in western Kenya’s rain season, and today there seems to be no end to the rough dirt road snaking to the Masogo Health Centre. Auma is eight months pregnant and trudging to an antenatal check-up. She already has a baby, who at 11 months old is overdue for his measles and yellow fever vaccinations at the...
2017-05-032017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-05-03-00-paying-for-change-kenya-offers-cash-to-parents-willing-to-vaccinate-babies/
  
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After 23 years of ‘freedom’, some health facilities are operating without the water as provincial authorities blame municipalities and municipalities drag their feet. Government healthcare facilities around the country – the only place the poorest people can go when they are sick – are often left without the most basic resource: water. Many clinics and hospitals have been left with dry taps, sometimes for several months.
2017-05-022017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/02/dry-facilities-indictment-democracy/
  
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Good rains and hot, humid conditions have fuelled a surge in malaria cases in 2017, after 2016’s drought led to a low number of cases reported to the National Institutes for Communicable Diseases (NICD). There were 9,478 cases of malaria identified in SA during the year to March 31, an almost 50% increase on the 6,375 cases reported in 2016, the NICD announced last week. Just under half the recent cases (4,328) were caused by local transmission, as weather and a suboptimal household...
2017-05-022017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-02-malaria-cases-rise-50-after-delays-in-spraying/
  
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Lay counsellors are being trained to assist a handful of psychiatrists to deal with the minds of Nigerians racked by Boko Haram terror Bulus Apollos is sitting in the small courtyard of a compound in Gomari Gana, an area with dusty streets in Maiduguri, Nigeria. His hands, gnarled from years of onion farming, shake as he lifts faded yellow trousers to reveal swollen feet. Apollos (47) was held captive for over a year by Boko Haram fighters, the Islamist insurgents who have waged a bloody...
2017-04-252017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-25-handful-of-psychologists-deal-with-minds-racked-by-boko-haram-terror
  
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News release 24 APRIL 2017 | GENEVA, NAIROBI - At an event on the eve of World Malaria Day in Nairobi, WHO called today for accelerated scale-up of efforts to prevent malaria and save lives. In sub-Saharan Africa, which shoulders 90% of the global malaria burden, more than 663 million cases have been averted since 2001. Insecticide-treated nets have had the greatest impact, accounting for an estimated 69% of cases prevented through control tools. Together with diagnosis and...
2017-04-242017-06-23 12:00 AMWHOhttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/world-malaria-day/en/
  
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JOHANNESBURG — Three African countries have been chosen to test the world’s first malaria vaccine, the World Health Organization announced Monday. Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi will begin piloting the injectable vaccine next year with hundreds of thousands of young children, who have been at highest risk of death. The vaccine, which has partial effectiveness, has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives if used with existing measures, the WHO regional director for Africa,...
2017-04-242017-06-23 12:00 AMSTAThttps://www.statnews.com/2017/04/24/african-countries-malaria-vaccine/
  
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A decade ago, most countries used only localised strategies. But Zambia decided to make bed nets, insecticides, and drugs available nationwide. As doctors, we have seen the devastating effect of malaria on children, families and communities. We have heartbreaking memories of patients lost to this preventable disease. But we are now witnessing a new history. On April 25, Zambia launched a national elimination strategy. We are aggressively pursuing the goal of a malaria-free country by 2021...
2017-04-242017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-25-00-comment-zambian-health-organisations-are-zambitious-about-eradicating-malaria
  
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The healthcare system is collapsing in KwaZulu-Natal as hospitals are short-staffed and filled with broken equipment. "Every day it gets worse," said the head of the KwaZulu-Natal coastal branch of the SA Medical Association, Mvuyisi Mzukwa. Mzukwa wrote a letter to the head of the SA Medical Association on behalf of the province's doctors. The Times has a copy of the letter, which warns of a growing risk in medical legal cases due to the reduced level of care at...
2017-04-182017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2017/04/18/KZN-health-in-bad-state1
  
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KwaZulu-Natal Health, together with an NGO called Integration of TB in Education and Care for HIV and Aids – known as I-TEACH – have embarked on a campaign to train thousands of traditional healers to conduct HIV/Aids tests on their clients. The department hopes this initiative will help slow the spread of the virus. To date, over 450 traditional healers have graduated from the programme. According to I-Teach, four in 10 people are infected with the HI...
2017-04-112017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/campaign-teach-traditional-healers-conduct-hivaids-tests/
  
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Could Zimbabwe's new Health Development Fund rescue the country's cash-strapped clinics and hospitals? For two years, Widna Chiyangwa from Harare, Zimbabwe, suffered in pain. She was in her mid-40s and had four children to feed. But a broken ankle had left her without an income — she could no longer work as an informal trader because she couldn’t walk. Chiyangwa required urgent surgery to fix her ankle, but she couldn’t afford it
2017-04-062017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-06-00-how-to-fund-a-failing-health-system
  
Article
A single daily tablet could slash your risk of HIV infection, could it be for you? More people than ever are taking the once-a-day pill to help prevent HIV infection. As of the beginning of this month, HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Tshwane are the latest to get access to Truvada, a two-in-one antiretroviral. When the pill is taken daily as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), it can reduce a person’s risk of HIV infection by between 44% and more than 90%, depending on how..
2017-04-052017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-05-00-the-myths-that-could-be-standing-between-you-and-the-hiv-prevention-pill-truvada
  
Article
The Department of Health has revealed that it cannot afford to hire its full complement of nurses and doctors, telling MPs it is short of at least R3.2-billion for the 2017-2018 financial year.   The department's director-general, Precious Matsoso, told the parliamentary standing committee on appropriations that the healthcare system had 45,733 vacant posts, and 351,925 filled posts - an 11.5% shortfall.
2017-04-042017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2017/04/04/Health-department-in-sick-bay-R3.2bn-budget-shortfall-leaves-11.5-of-jobs-unfilled
  
Article
An insular, nativist, authoritarian wave has been on the rise in countries around the world. These movements play on people's fears and insecurities. They create scapegoats, especially vulnerable minorities, and attempt to falsely blame these groups as the cause of people's fears. They also try to undermine institutions such as an independent media and judiciary, which are vital to maintaining the ties of accountability between the elected and the public: structures crucial to a...
2017-04-012017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(17)30102-X/fulltext
  
Article
Did the United Nation’s millennium development goals (MDGs) make any difference? Perhaps no question is more important for assessing the results of global policy cooperation between 2000 and 2015. But this is a difficult question to answer, because pathways of cause and effect are difficult to discern. In our study we examined which trajectories changed, for better or worse, and to what scale of human consequence. Here we highlight three key findings.
2017-03-302017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/mar/30/how-successful-were-the-millennium-development-goals?CMP=share_btn_tw
  
Article
Stumbling blocks remain to effective testing of how the National Health Insurance will work at pilot sitesTeething problems at provincial health departments, including a lack of co-ordination, poor planning and uncertainty in districts, remain stumbling blocks to the effective testing of how the National Health Insurance (NHI) will work at pilot sites. The dire state of affairs was detailed in a Financial and Fiscal Commission presentation to Parliament’s portfolio committee on...
2017-03-292017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-03-29-committee-hears-of-nhi-pilot-problems/
  
Article
South Africa has the highest estimated tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate amongst the 22 high burden countries globally, with 834 new TB cases per 100,000 population. But there is evidence that the rate of new confirmed TB cases in the country is dropping. Now an online TB Surveillance Dashboard has been developed to better track and analyse the infectious disease. TB can affect people of all age groups but is most common among adults, particularly those co-...
2017-03-292017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/world-tb-day-launch-online-tb-surveillance-dashboard/
  
Article
More than 190 learners in Grade 3‚ 4 and 5 fell pregnant between 2014 and 2016‚ a response to a parliamentary question has revealed. If learners from Grade 6 and 7 who fell pregnant are taken into account‚ the number jumps to 1‚449. “This information should shock every South African‚” the DA’s MP and basic education portfoli
2017-03-272017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/local/2017/03/27/In-primary-school-and-pregnant-The-shocking-numbers1
  
Article
Diagnosing TB in people who have HIV has been a challenge because they often have low levels of the bacteria in their system. This has been a serious problem for a country like South Africa where 454,000 people are infected with TB each year, half of whom are HIV positive. The Conversation Africa’s Health and Medicine Editor Candice Bailey spoke to Professor Bavesh Kana about a landmark study that provides a solution to tackling this diagnostic problem. What has the traditional...
2017-03-242017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/new-study-helps-crack-the-problem-of-diagnosing-tb-in-people-with-hiv-75121
  
Article
The emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis has resulted in scientists taking a more aggressive and urgent approach to research into the development of the disease. As the number of drug resistant TB cases has continued to rise, so has the need for rapid diagnosis, new treatment and new strategies that could help contain the disease.
2017-03-232017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/latest-transmission-patterns-for-drug-resistant-tb-pose-a-new-challenge-75010
  
Article
Contraception may be finally coming to a secondary school near you. South Africa is expected to release its new national HIV strategy later this month. In a country that continues to battle the world's largest HIV epidemic, the document will guide the next six years in the fight against new infections. The South African National Aids Council (Sanac), civil society groups and key government departments met to finalise the strategy late last week. The plan not only outlines the...
2017-03-212017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-21-00-three-things-we-can-expect-from-south-africaa-new-hiv-and-tb-plan
  
Article
This is a time of unprecedented change in medical education globally. Medical schools, postgraduate bodies and other organisations are responding to rapid advances in medicine and changes in health care delivery. New education approaches are being adopted to exchange information. This enables the institutions to produce relevant health professionals.
2017-03-212017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/kenyan-medical-students-are-learning-through-a-community-outreach-model-74382
  
Article
A doctor shortage in war-torn Mozambique paved the way for a new breed of surgeons that have slashed deaths among new mothers. In Caia, a small truck-stop town in a remote part of Mozambique’s central Sofala province, Sebastiana Domingos has just started her shift at the district hospital. She gently examines the scar on a patient’s abdomen. The 34-year-old pregnant woman was rushed to hospital after her uterus ruptured. “She was bleeding heavily and was severely...
2017-03-212017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisa http://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-21-mozambique-doctors-pass-the-scapel-to-nurses-in-the-quest-for-safer-births-c-sections
  
Article
Every month‚ Nancy (not her real name) and her business partner travel to Zimbabwe to stock up on Marvelon family planning pills. She smuggles them back into South Africa‚ where she sells them at a healthy profit to other Zimbabweans who for various reasons don’t want the contraceptive pills dispensed in South African clinics. Nancy’s suppliers are hospital staff in Zimbabwean hospitals who sell the pills to her for R5 a blister pack. Marvelon is distributed...
2017-03-202017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/africa/2017/03/20/Free-Zimbabwean-contraceptives-smuggled-for-sale-in-South-Africa
  
Article
Today, if someone is diagnosed with HIV, he or she can choose among 41 drugs that can treat the disease. And there’s a good chance that with the right combination, given at the right time, the drugs can keep HIV levels so low that the person never gets sick.
2017-03-192017-06-23 12:00 AMTimehttp://time.com/4705809/first-aids-drug-azt/
  
Article
by Mogale Mojela on March 14, 2017 Patients who are badly treated at Limpopo hospitals are failing to report negligence or misconduct, prompting the Health Professions Council of South Africa to launch an awareness campaign to inform people of their rights, Mogale Mojela writes.
2017-03-142017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/03/14/hpcsa-urges-residents-report-misconduct/
  
Article
Kerry Cullinan on March 13, 2017 This killer preys on older, overweight and obese women – mainly from poor communities. It has been moving stealthily through the population, its influence under-estimated as our attention has been focused on HIV and tuberculosis.
2017-03-132017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/03/13/theres-new-killer-town/
  
Article
A deal brokered with the health department guarantees free access but for how long? Drugmaker Otsuka Pharmaceutical won’t charge South Africa for using its new tuberculosis (TB) drug in a pilot programme, but South Africa’s free deal is unlikely to last. The drug, delamanid, is one of the first new TB medicines to be developed in 50 years. In unpublished research by international humanitarian organisation  Doctors Without Borders (MSF) delamanid has been shown...
2017-03-082017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-08-00-drug-maker-otsuka-to-provide-new-wonder-tb-drug-delamanid-to-south-africa-for-free
  
Article
Gauteng finance MEC Barbara Creecy on Tuesday tabled a R108bn budget for the province, which included R10bn added to the baseline of departments to meet increased demand. Gauteng is the largest contributor to the country’s economy and accounts for 35% of SA's gross domestic product (GDP). The main priorities for the provincial government were education, health and infrastructure. The largest amount - R40.8bn - was allocated to the education...
2017-03-072017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttp://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2017-03-07-gauteng-increases-mental-health-spending-after-esidimeni-crisis/
  
Article
SA’s Phelophepa train draws a crowd wherever it goes. The sound of the lumbering 19-car clinic-on-rails signals the arrival of badly needed free healthcare for thousands of South Africans as it tours the country. "When you arrive, people are always ready, there will be kids performing," said train manager Anna Mokwena, a nurse. At a stop this week in Pienaarsrivier, a town in Limpopo, dozens of elderly patients alongside women clutching...
2017-03-072017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttp://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-03-07-full-steam-ahead-for-sas-clinic-on-rails/
  
Article
Once slices of the healthcare funding pie are dished out to provinces, there is little control over how this money is spent to benefit the rural poor. In Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s budget speech in last week, he touted the type of inclusive economic growth and radical transformation that is long overdue in South Africa. Each year, the minister’s speech outlines the broad brushstrokes of the country’s economic policy. From there, money flows from the...
2017-03-022017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-02-00-radical-transformation-begins-with-fixing-how-we-fund-healthcare-in-remote-areas/
  
Article
Statistics South Africa has released its exhaustive analysis of mortality and causes of death in 2015, noting a 3% decline to 460,236 deaths. The three leading causes were tuberculosis, diabetes and cerebrovascular disease. Key findings summary:
2017-03-012017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/stats-sa-reports-slight-decline-deaths/
  
Article
There has been a significant increase in deaths from diabetes, which is now South Africa’s second biggest killer. Diabetes is the number one killer of women and people living in the Western Cape. This is according to StatsSA, which yesterday (28 Feb) released a report on the causes of death in 2015. Tuberculosis remains the country’s biggest single killer, claiming 7,2% of all deaths followed by diabetes, which was responsible for 5,4% of deaths. In 2013,...
2017-03-012017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://www.health-e.org.za/2017/03/01/big-increase-diabetes-deaths/
  
Article
Epidemiological assessment of geographical heterogeneity of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) is necessary to inform HIV prevention and care strategies in the more generalised HIV epidemics across sub-Saharan Africa, including Malawi. We aimed to measure the HIV prevalence, risks, and access to HIV care among MSM across multiple localities to better inform HIV programming for MSM in Malawi.
2017-02-272017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30042-5/fulltext
  
Article
Scientists are embarking on a massive clinical trial to test a drug to reduce the chances of people living with HIV developing heart diseases and suffering from heart-related illnesses like strokes. The trial is being launched in South Africa but will span four ccntinents and involve 6,500 participants. The Conversation Africa’s health and medicine editor Candice Bailey asked Carl Dieffenbach and Gita Ramjee to explain the significance of the trial. How common is it for...
2017-02-272017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/south-africa-launches-clinical-trial-to-cut-heart-disease-in-hiv-positive-people-73625
  
Article
Social injustice is the biggest threat to global health and a radical change in society is needed if we really want people to live long, healthy lives. “What good does it do to treat people and send them back to the conditions that made them sick?” This is the question Sir Michael Marmot, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London, asks himself repeatedly. An expert in health and inequality, he spoke at Wits University recently about why...
2017-02-272017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/27/inequality-gap-impact-health/
  
Article
A mobile app in Senegal helps families save money and reduce waste through a "virtual pharmacy" where users can exchange leftover medication for new prescriptions. JokkoSante is scaling up after a two-year pilot phase in one Senegalese town and on Friday launched a partnership with its first hospital, said founder Adama Kane. It aims to reach 300,000 families in the West African nation by the end of the year. "Everyone has a box of unused medicine in their cabinet,...
2017-02-242017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/scitech/2017/02/24/African-app-cuts-medical-costs-with-community-virtual-pharmacy
  
Article
The Finance Minister announced that a NHI Fund will be set up this year in the next step towards universal health coverage. A National Health Insurance (NHI) Fund will help mentally ill patients among others, announced Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan in his 2017 budget speech. The initial priorities of the Fund include maternal health, family planning services, the integrated school health programme and improving the services for people with disabilities, the elderly and “...
2017-02-232017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/23/gordhan-outlines-initial-focus-nhi/
  
Article
Without accurate data, maginalised groups risk being left behind - again. Tanzania’s most recent national census tells us that about one in 16 people has a disability in the country’s Ruvuma region. But what if the true number was closer to one in five? Data is not just for analysts. When properly used, statistics can make a real difference to people’s lives. They can decide, for instance, where services such as hospitals, schools and voting stations are...
2017-02-222017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-02-22-00-miscounted-how-the-world-has-got-disability-figures-wrong
  
Article
The National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union (Nehawu) has accused top executives at the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) of corruption and maladministration, prompting the organisation’s board to commission a forensic audit. The investigation, conducted by Grant Thornton, is complete and its recommendations are due to be discussed at a two-day board meeting that begins on Wednesday. Among the NHLS executives fingered by Nehawu are CEO Joyce Mogale, chief...
2017-02-222017-06-23 12:00 AMBD LiveHttp://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-02-22-national-health-laboratory-service-heads-accused-of-graft/
  
Article
CATEGORY: HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB DATE: 21 February 2017 Press statement For immediate release Sixty thousand participants will take part in the fifth National HIV and Health Study The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) will visit 60 000 South Africans to request their participation in the country’s fifth HIV and Health study. Professor Leickness Simbayi, Deputy CEO for Research at the HSRC and overall Principal Investigator of the study, says field workers will be...
2017-02-212017-06-23 12:00 AMHuman Sciences Research Councilhttp://www.hsrc.ac.za/en/media-briefs/hiv-aids-stis-and-tb/sabsmm-feb-2017
  
Article
Chairing a session on HIV self-testing at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle this week, Joanne Stekler said that much is alread
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMAidsmaphttp://www.aidsmap.com/How-should-HIV-self-testing-services-be-provided/page/3118526/
  
Article
Late last month, Heads of State and governments from across the continent gathered in Addis Ababa for the 28th African Union (AU) Summit writes Yolanda Moyo of PATH South Africa. Leaders and policymakers discussed a wide range of issues, but one common thread ran through the meeting—the need to “strengthen the spirit of pan-Africanism and unity” to achieve shared goals.
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/17/no-delays-accelerating-access-medicine/
  
Article
HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) appears to be nearly 100% effective if taken
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMAidsmaphttp://www.aidsmap.com/page/3118230/
  
Article
New analysis of data detailing the extent of sexual violence in the Rustenburg area indicates that one in five HIV infections (approximately 6,765 of all female cases) and one in three cases of depression among women (5,022 cases) are attributable to rape and intimate-partner violence (IPV), while one in three women inducing abortion (1,296 cases) was pregnant as a result of sexual violence.
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMMSFhttps://www.msf.org.za/stories-news/press-releases/south-africa-sexual-violence-platinum-mining-belt-major-driver-hiv
  
Article
Usually a death sentence, extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) can potentially be cured with a new drug combination. Interim results from the Nix-TB trial, which were presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle, are extremely promising and point to new hope for people diagnosed with XDR-TB.
2017-02-162017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/16/deadliest-form-tb-potential-cure-last/
  
Article
Providing immune cell testing and HIV treatment counseling immediately after a positive HIV test was the first in a series of measures that increased rapid linkage to care and retention at ten clinic sites in  Mozambique, data presented here Thursday showed. Measures in a randomized trial of interventions in Maputo and Inhambane Province also included accelerated access to antiretroviral treatment and text message appointment reminders. Findings from the trial were presented by...
2017-02-162017-06-23 12:00 AMSciences Speak Bloghttp://sciencespeaksblog.org/2017/02/16/croi-2017-efforts-to-improve-linkage-and-adherence-to-hiv-care-in-mozambique-and-south-africa-yield-results/
  
Article
Daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV works as well in women with abnormal vaginal microbiota as in women with normal levels of vaginal flora. This new finding addresses concerns arising from previous research that suggested that an anti-HIV vaginal gel might not effectively prevent the virus among women with bacterial vaginosis or other indicators of an imbalance in the vaginal microbiome.
2017-02-152017-06-23 12:00 AMPOZ https://www.poz.com/article/oral-prep-works-women-abnormal-vaginal-microbiota?utm_source=phplist335&utm_medium=email&utm_content=HTML&utm_campaign=U.S.+HIV+Infection+Rate+Falls
  
Article
A themed discussion from Wednesday's Plenary Session. Presented by Shannon L Hader, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA, at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2017. Access the video and sildes from the presentation here.
2017-02-152017-06-23 12:00 AMCROhttp://www.croiwebcasts.org/console/player/33442?mediaType=slideVideo&
  
Article
HIV incidence has started to tumble in one of the best-studied groups of people in Africa, the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) heard in Sea
2017-02-142017-06-23 12:00 AMAidsmap http://www.aidsmap.com/A-benign-circle-how-a-combination-of-factors-has-reduced-HIV-infections-in-one-of-the-hardest-hit-parts-of-Africa/page/3117447/
  
Article
A themed discussion from the session entitled Strangers in the night: challenges and opportunities in STI control. Presented by R. Scott McClelland, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2017.   Access the audio and sildes from the presentation here.
2017-02-142017-06-23 12:00 AMCROhttp://www.croiwebcasts.org/console/player/33430?mediaType=slideVideo&
  
Article
A themed discussion from the session entitled Prep withour borders: new delivery options. Presented by Christine M Khosropour, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2017. Access the audio and sildes from Christine's presentation here.
2017-02-142017-06-23 12:00 AMCROhttp://www.croiwebcasts.org/console/player/33411?mediaType=slideVideo&
  
Article
President Jacob Zuma presented the State of the Nation Address (SoNA) to a joint sitting of the two Houses of Parliament (National Assembly and National Council of Provinces) on 9 February 2017 at 19h00. This was President Zuma’s fourth State of the Nation Address (SoNA) to the joint sitting of the two houses of Parliament since he was re-elected in May 2014. Access a full manuscript of the address, as well as a video recording, here: http://www.gov.za/SONA2017
2017-02-092017-06-23 12:00 AMSouth African Governmenthttp://www.gov.za/SONA2017
  
Article
Daniel Opoku, Victor Stephani and Wilm Quentin The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the use of mobile phones is rising, expanding the opportunities for the implementation of mobile phone-based health (mHealth) interventions. This review aims to understand how, why, for whom, and in what circumstances mHealth interventions against NCDs improve treatment and care in sub-Saharan Africa.
2017-02-062017-06-23 12:00 AMBioMed Central http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-017-0782-z
  
Article
Robert Hogg, Busisiwe Nkala, Janan Dietrich, Alexandra Collins, Kalysha Closson, Zishan Cui, Steve Kanters, Jason Chia, Bernard Barhafuma, Alexis Palmer, Angela Kaida, Glenda Gray, Cari Miller
2017-02-022017-06-23 12:00 AMPlosOnehttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0165087
  
Article
The South African Medical Association (SAMA) has expressed its disappointment and concern over remarks by Health Minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi regarding the uptake of posts by doctors. The Association said the remarks by Dr Motsoaledi were unfortunate. Dr Motsoaledi made the remarks at a press briefing in Pretoria on 19 January 2017. “While we are pleased that the Minister acknowledged that there are issues around the unemployment of doctors in three categories (which we first raised...
2017-01-242017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Chroniclehttps://www.medicalchronicle.co.za/sama-disappointed-over-ministers-statements-on-unemployed-doctors/
  
Article
Pascalia O. Munyewende, Jonathan Levin & Laetitia C. Rispel Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC) reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage.
2017-01-202017-06-23 12:00 AMGlobal Health Actionhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/gha.v9.32486
  
Article
Virginia E.M. Zweigenthal, Emma Marquez & Leslie London Public health (PH) approaches underpin the management and transformation of health systems in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the Master of Public Health (MPH) rarely being a prerequisite for health service employment in South Africa, many physicians pursue MPH qualifications.
2017-01-202017-06-23 12:00 AMGlobal Health Actionhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/gha.v9.32735
  
Article
Erik Blas, John E. Ataguba, Tanvir M. Huda, Giang Kim Bao, Davide Rasella, Megan R. Gerecke Since the publication of the reports by the Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH), many research papers have documented inequities, explaining causal pathways in order to inform policy and programmatic decision-making. At the international level, the sustainable development goals (SDGs) reflect an attempt to bring together these themes and the complexities involved in defining a...
2017-01-202017-06-23 12:00 AMGlobal Health Actionhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/gha.v9.29002
  
Article
Franziska Meinck, Lucie Cluver, Heidi Loening-Voysey, Rachel Bray , Jenny Doubt, Marisa Casale & Lorraine Sherr Physical, emotional and sexual child abuse are major problems in South Africa. This study investigates whether children know about post-abuse services, if they disclose and seek services, and what the outcomes of help-seeking behaviour are. It examines factors associated with request and receipt of services. Confidential self-report questionnaires were completed by adolescents...
2017-01-192017-06-23 12:00 AMPsychology, Health & Medicinehttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13548506.2016.1271950
  
Article
A new HIV drug combination could save SA billions of rands – plus it would be easier and safer for patients to take.
2017-01-172017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/01/17/advance-hiv-study-set-save-sa-billions/
  
Article
Brian T Chan, Alexander C Tsai HIV-related stigma hampers treatment and prevention efforts worldwide. Effective interventions to counter HIV-related stigma are greatly needed. Although the “contact hypothesis” suggests that personal contact with persons living with HIV (PLHIV) may reduce stigmatizing attitudes in the general population, empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis is lacking. Our aim was to estimate the association between personal contact with PLHIV and HIV...
2017-01-102017-06-23 12:00 AMJournal of the International AIDS Societyhttp://www.jiasociety.org/index.php/jias/article/view/21395/pdf
  
Article
Lack of proper training on Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) leads to a high rate of accidental pregnancies within the first year of use. In South Africa as many as 600 000 women experience unwanted pregnancies due to contraceptive failure. Globally the rate of accidental pregnancies is 40%. This should not have to be.  Follow source URL to continue reading
2016-12-302017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2016/12/30/lack-training-contraceptives-rises-unwanted-pregnancies/
  
Article
Listeriosis is a serious bacterial disease caused by the Gram-positive, rod shaped bacterium, Listeria
monocytogenes. The bacterium is widely distributed in nature and an be found in soil, water and
contaminated food.
2016-12-052017-12-05 12:00 AMNational Institute for Communicable Diseaseshttp://www.hst.org.za/publications/Documents/Frequently%20Asked%20Questions%20-%20Listeriosis_20170601.pdf
  
Article
In the wake of National Antibiotics Awareness Week (14 to 20 November), the spotlight will fall on the critical role that vaccines are likely to play in curbing anti-microbial resistance (AMR) - at least in the foreseeable future until a new stream of antiobiotics are brought to market, which according to experts may still be a long way off. Click on source URL to read more.
2016-11-142017-06-23 12:00 AMR Newshttp://www.rnews.co.za/article/11847/vaccinate-to-protect-against-rise-of-antibiotic-resistant-superbugs
  
Article
The need for WHO reform
2016-09-132017-06-23 12:00 AMBMJ Global Healthhttp://gh.bmj.com/content/1/2/e000047
  
Article
MomConnect delivers text messages to women, with information geared towards their stage of pregnancy - and soon pregnant women with HIV will be able to receive specialised messages. From next week, many expectant mothers living with HIV will be able to sign up for, and receive, specialised information about the condition and their pregnancy, and how to prevent infection in their babies, as the Department of Health expands its MomConnect service. Launched by Health Minister Aaron...
2016-09-132017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-e News https://www.health-e.org.za/2016/09/08/moms-hiv-set-get-connected/
  
Article
World leaders gather at the United Nations General Assembly in New York this month to mount a response to the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance. Gary Humphreys and Fiona Fleck report. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2016;94:638-639. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.16.020916 Dr Abdul Ghafur, a consultant in infectious diseases in Chennai, had become alarmed by the number of multidrug-resistant infections in patients at major hospitals across India. In desperation,...
2016-09-132017-06-23 12:00 AMWHOhttp://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/94/9/16-020916/en/
  
Article
Pretoria - Strong leadership and political presence were among the key factors in the implementation of a universal health-care system in the country. In addition to new care models, a sound payment system and empowered citizens, this could lead to the success to the National Health Insurance programme. "There are bold steps to be taken, and with most counties in the world under pressure to provide universal health care, South Africa has many global lessons to learn from," said...
2016-09-052017-06-23 12:00 AMIOLhttp://www.iol.co.za/business/news/strong-leadership-key-to-successful-nhi-2064514
  
Article
What is the future for Africa? A bleak case is made powerfully by Tim Marshall in his book Prisoners of Geography (Elliott and Thompson, 2015). His premise is that the land on which we live shapes us all. "The physical realities that underpin national and international politics are too often disregarded", Marshall writes. Geography explains the why of nations. It is the "decisive factor in the course of human history". That truth is the reason geography is ignored by those...
2016-09-032017-06-23 12:00 AMthelancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)31531-8/fulltext
  
Article
To help countries implement their health reforms, the World Bank and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (Global Fund) committed to invest $24 billion in Africa over the next three to five years. TB and Malaria (Global Fund) committed to invest $24 billion in Africa over the next three to five years. The announcement was made ahead of the two-day TICAD conference, which is Japan’s flagship programme for African development. One of the focal points at this year’s...
2016-08-312017-06-23 12:00 AME-Health newshttp://ehealthnews.co.za/accelerating-universal-health-coverage-africa/
  
Article
Scientists have warned that potentially deadly fungal infections are acquiring resistance to many of the medicines currently used to combat them. More than a million people die of fungal infections every year, including about 7,000 in the UK, and deaths are likely to increase as resistance continues to rise. Researchers say the widespread use of fungicides on crops is one of the main causes of the rise in fungal resistance, which mirrors the rise of resistance to antibiotics used to treat...
2016-08-292017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Guardian
  
Article
A shortage of HIV testing could undermine global efforts to diagnose and treat people with the infection, warn experts from the World Health Organization. They looked at responses to annual surveys that the WHO had sent to 127 countries between 2012 and 2014 asking about capacity and usage of blood tests that check HIV status and health. They found worrying gaps in provision. They warn that United Nation targets for HIV could be missed as a result.
2016-08-252017-06-23 12:00 AMWHOhttp://www.bbc.com/news/health-37168771
  
Article
A new programme aimed at addressing the high mortality rate of children under five years old has been launched in the Eastern Cape – using puppets and educational play to teach small children basic healthcare that could save their lives. This latest project takes the form of multimedia resources developed by Sesame Workshop – the education arm of the popular children’s programme Takalani Sesame, in partnership with Johnson & Johnson. An educational app named Healthy...
2016-08-232017-06-23 12:00 AME-Health Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2016/08/23/takalani-sesame-new-project-combat-child-mortality/
  
Article
The African continent has the ignominious distinction of housing the seven countries in which the highest number of children die before their fifth birthday, according to the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation. These countries — Angola, the Central African Republic, Chad, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Somalia — all have an under-five mortality rate above 100 deaths per 1 000 live births.
2016-08-182017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2016-08-18-00-breast-is-best-exclusive-breastfeeding-could-turn-africas-child-mortality-tide
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