Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Sign In
  
  
Body
  
  
  
  
  
Article
The energy of the anti-racism movement has brought many countries to a strategic historical juncture, inspiring them to reevaluate the effects of colonialism on the rights, well-being and cultural integrity of peoples in the Global South. As an extension of that process, there has been a surge of interest in decolonising global health partnerships.
In educational global health partnerships, practitioners from high-income countries (HICs) work jointly with practitioners and community members from low/middle-income countries (LMICs) through bidirectional education. Together, partners engage community members and strengthen individual and institutional capacities to provide healthcare. Adopting a ‘decolonised’ perspective in these partnerships involves dismantling colonial educational structures, addressing western hegemony, and, for indigenous scholars such as Tamale, ‘reclaiming our humanity; rebuilding our territorial and bodily integrity (and) reasserting our self-determination’.
2021-11-172021-11-19 12:00 AMBMJ Global Healthhttps://gh.bmj.com/content/6/11/e006964
  
Article
Today WHO joins advocates around the world to commemorate a landmark Day of Action for Cervical Cancer Elimination and welcome groundbreaking new initiatives to end this devastating disease, which claims the lives of over 300 000 women each year. As with COVID-19, access to lifesaving tools is constrained, with women and adolescent girls in the poorest countries deprived of clinical screening facilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and treatments which those in affluent places take for granted.
2021-11-172021-11-19 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/17-11-2021-global-leaders-call-for-cervical-cancer-elimination-on-day-of-action
  
Article
Human rights organisations are concerned about policy changes affecting immigrants since the Gauteng health department gazetted it in June last year and issued a circular in May 2020. According to the organisations, medical care is being denied to asylum seekers and refugees if they are undocumented or have expired permits, unless they can pay upfront fees. Hlengiwe Mtshatsha of Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) said: "The new fee structure is very high and foreign nationals end up being on the highest scale and are required to pay upfront.
2021-11-172021-11-19 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/southafrica/news/immigrants-in-joburg-claim-they-are-being-denied-healthcare-20211117
  
Article
There has been a steady increase in the number of influenza cases from the week starting August 23, with a sharp increase in the week beginning November 1 in a number of surveillance sites, the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) said on Wednesday. In addition, private laboratories have reported an increase in influenza case detections and the NICD has received reports of clusters of cases in schools and workplaces.
2021-11-172021-11-19 12:00 AMTimes Livehttps://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2021-11-17-flu-cases-in-summer-season-show-a-sharp-increase-nicd-warns/
  
Article
Boys and men are more likely than women to die as teenagers or young adults, according to new research that warns the gender gap in mortality rates for that age group is widening in many countries. In 2019, nearly two thirds (61%) of all deaths among 10- to 24-year-olds worldwide occurred in males, said the research published in The Lancet last week. Since 1950, mortality rates in males aged 10 to 24 have decreased by 15.3%, lagging behind improvements in female mortality rates, which decreased by 30% in this age group.
2021-11-152021-11-19 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/health-news-south-africa/2021-11-15-mostly-men-why-they-die-young/
  
Article
A teacher with extensive experience educating children with hearing impairments has urged parents to seek professional help for their kids sooner rather than later. Maria Nemakonde has taught at the Tshilidzini School for Special Education, just outside Thohoyandou in Limpopo, for 10 years. She said it is difficult for parents to accept and understand that their child might have a hearing or speech impairment. This often results in a delay in seeking professional help. Nemakonde said that it pains her to see children with special needs being denied their right to education. She said parents often choose to hide them at home
2021-11-152021-11-19 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/11/15/dont-hide-children-with-hearing-impairments/
  
Article
Women, and probably men, have been using remedies to lighten their skin for centuries. In her book, Face Paint: The Story of Makeup, Lisa Eldridge says that remains of the lead used to whiten skin were found in upper-class women’s graves in Ancient Greece, and that in Tang Dynasty China, lead pigments were used in cosmetics. White lead is of course the basis of the mixture, known as “Venetian ceruse”, that England’s Queen Elizabeth I used to create her characteristic white mask. The toxic concoction, known to cause hair loss, is thought to have contributed to her death at 69.
2021-11-152021-11-19 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/life/2021-11-15-the-dark-side-of-skin-lighteners/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1636967269
  
Article
Tucked away outside Cape Town, Khayelitsha is a township that is home to about half a million people. Many families in the area share small corrugated zinc houses with limited access to basic services such as clean water and sanitation. It is in such areas that diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) spread rapidly. According to Dr Anja Reuter from Doctors without Borders (MSF), there are about 170 to 200 cases of rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (RR-TB) per year in this area, with 70% co-infected with HIV. Rifampicin is a key drug in the treatment of drug-susceptible forms of TB.
2021-11-142021-11-19 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/11/11/family-focus-shows-promise-for-tb-prevention/
  
Article
Around 50 percent of South Africans living with diabetes are unaware they have the disease, and the public health system cannot afford to treat them. Today is World Diabetes Day. The Inaugural Diabetes Summit heard that South Africa should focus on preventing diabetes in the population as the country cannot afford to treat everyone. It cost an estimated R2.7-billion to treat those who were diagnosed with diabetes in 2018.
2021-11-142021-11-19 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/11/14/most-south-africans-do-not-know-they-have-diabetes/
  
Article
Children living with HIV have to take multiple different antiretroviral (ARV) pills or syrups twice a day, while most adults in South Africa have been offered one pill once a day regimens for around a decade. At the recent South African HIV Clinicians Society (SAHCS) conference, various speakers argued that better treatment regimens for kids are needed urgently.
2021-11-102021-11-12 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/11/10/experts-urge-registration-of-new-child-friendly-arv-formulation/
  
Article
A Wits professor has labelled cancer ‘a national crisis’ with early diagnosis still a huge obstacle within the public healthcare system. Although chemotherapy is now readily available in all nine provinces, patients are still slipping through undetected. Professor Paul Ruff, head of Medical Oncology at the University of Witwatersrand (Wits), stressed the importance of early and proper diagnosis. He spoke during the National Department of Health webinar titled ‘Early cancer diagnoses save lives, cut treatment costs’ on Sunday.
2021-11-092021-11-12 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/11/09/early-cancer-diagnosis-sa-needs-to-step-up/
  
Article
Countries and non-state actors have come forward with new commitments and initiatives that will strengthen the resilience of women and girls in the face of climate-related impacts, while empowering them within climate action, at today’s COP26 Gender Day in Glasgow. These new commitments build upon in excess of USD 139 million in pledges already made towards the UN Women-convened Action Coalition on Feminist Action for Climate Justice, launched at the Generation Equality Forum in Paris in July.
2021-11-092021-11-19 12:00 AMUN Womenhttps://www.unwomen.org/en/news-stories/press-release/2021/11/press-release-bold-new-commitments-from-around-the-world-to-put-gender-equality-at-the-forefront-of-climate-action-at-cop26
  
Article
Data from South Africa highlight the challenge faced by many treatment programmes when it comes to successfully retaining people in HIV care. The HIV treatment programme in South Africa reaches more people living with HIV than any other in the world, with more than 5 million adults (aged 15 years and older) receiving antiretroviral therapy in 2020. Among the 2.5 million adults living with HIV in South Africa who are not on treatment, a steadily increasing percentage are people who had started treatment but are no longer receiving it.
2021-11-082021-11-12 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2021/november/20211108_retention-in-care-growing-concern
  
Article
A geriatric assessment intervention for older patients with advanced cancer significantly reduced the toxic effects from cancer treatments in the GAP70+ trial
2021-11-052021-11-12 12:00 AMMedpage Todayhttps://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/othercancers/95483?xid=fb_o&trw=no
  
Article
Jaishree Raman, National Institute for Communicable Diseases and Shüné Oliver, National Institute for Communicable Diseases. There were dire warnings that malaria cases would surge across Africa after the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak as a global pandemic in early March 2020.  Many felt that the already overburdened healthcare systems would not be able to cope with increased patient loads. There was also concern that the pandemic would disrupt the delivery of essential malaria services. Fortunately, these predictions have not fully materialised. Most malaria control programmes on the continent took action to keep delivering essential malaria services.
2021-11-052021-11-12 12:00 AMNICDhttps://www.nicd.ac.za/the-seven-steps-south-africa-is-taking-to-get-it-closer-to-eliminating-malaria/
  
Article
Tobacco use causes 8 million deaths every year from health consequences such as cardiovascular diseases, lung disorders, cancers, diabetes, and many other debilitating diseases. Quitting can be challenging, especially with the added social and economic stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the 1.3 billion tobacco users globally, as many as 60% have expressed the desire to quit – however only 30% have access to the tools to help them to do so successfully.
2021-11-052021-11-12 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/05-11-2021-two-new-tobacco-cessation-medicines-added-to-the-who-essential-medicines-list
  
Article
You might experience stress because you are worried about how well you will do in the exam. Research shows high levels of exam stress can interfere with attention and reduce working memory, leading to lower performance. Early experiences of anxiety and stress can also set a precedent for mental health problems in adulthood. Exam stress can be overwhelming and exhausting. It’s important to manage this stress and find coping strategies that work for you, to eliminate the risk of burn-out.
2021-11-042021-11-05 12:00 AMIOLhttps://www.iol.co.za/education/keep-your-mental-health-in-check-during-exam-time-f3cd583d-a075-4430-99c1-12401399113e
  
Article
The screening, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in children remain far from optimal – and in many respects lag behind what can be done for adults. Below we pick out five developments in paediatric TB presented at the 52nd Union World Conference on Lung Health recently held online. It is a big conference and we no doubt missed some interesting studies – you can browse the conference abstracts for yourself here.
2021-11-042021-11-12 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/11/04/five-interesting-developments-in-paediatric-tuberculosis/
  
Article
Annually on December 1st, we commemorate World AIDS Day and reflect upon our worldwide response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This year has been especially poignant as we mark 40 years since the first five cases of what later became known as AIDS were officially reported and honor the more than 36 million people, including 700,000 in the United States, who have died from AIDS-related illness globally since the start of the epidemic. The U.S. Government’s theme for World AIDS Day 2021—Ending the HIV Epidemic: Equitable Access, Everyone’s Voice—highlights the Biden-Harris Administration’s strong commitment to ending the HIV epidemic globally by addressing health inequities and ensuring the voices of people with HIV are central in all our work.
2021-11-012021-11-05 12:00 AMHIV.govhttps://www.hiv.gov/blog/world-aids-day-2021-ending-hiv-epidemic-equitable-access-everyone-s-voice
  
Article
During recent study researchers have shown how air pollution reduces sperm count by causing inflammation in the brain. The findings of the study by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers were published in the journal ‘Environmental Health Perspectives’. Scientists already know that the brain has a direct line to the reproductive organs affecting fertility and sperm count under stressful conditions. For example, emotional stress can lead to skipped menstrual periods in women. However, this latest study connects the dots on how breathing polluted air can lower fertility.
2021-11-012021-11-05 12:00 AMIOLhttps://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/health/study-shows-impact-of-air-pollution-on-sperm-count-
  
Article
It is estimated that “one in ten adults living in South Africa will have experienced major clinical depression at some point in their life but only 25% have sought treatment and care for their mental conditions, such as depression”. Although these estimates are based on the South African Stress and Health (SASH) study, last done in 2009, subsequent studies have also stressed the challenge of reducing this treatment gap.
2021-10-252021-10-29 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/10/25/in-depth-how-are-depression-and-bipolar-disorder-treated-in-the-public-sector/
  
Article
A new app called Tracto, which allows parents of children with mental health challenges to keep track of what’s going on in their lives, has brought much-needed relief in managing behaviour and treatment with the touch of a button. Developed in South Africa, the free app enables parents and teachers to collaboratively track any new developments among children with mental health or neurodiverse conditions including ADHD, autism and anxiety. After allowing for more accurate, in-time documenting of observations, Tracto then facilitates the convenient sharing of information with health care providers. Tracto was made available on app stores in July after two years of research and development and is already being used by more than 200 parents.
2021-10-252021-10-29 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/10/25/tracto-online-tool-give-parents-welcome-peace-of-mind/
  
Article
People battling rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (RR-TB) could soon have access to a shorter and safer course of treatment. Doctors without Borders (MSF) have released the results from a clinical trial on an all oral six-month treatment regime. Current treatment can last almost two years and can include painful injections and taking up to 20 pills a day. `And it cures only one in two patients. One participant in the trial, Awande Ndlovu, said it is easier to comply with the new treatment regime. “The shorter treatment would mean a lot as I think when you are on treatment, some parts of your life feel like they are put on hold. Before the trial gave me hope, I couldn’t even see the slightest glimpse of recovering from MDR-TB,” he said. Ndlovu was one of 559 patients from seven sites in Belarus, South Africa, and Uzbekistan who took part in the trial. Participants were put on a six-month regime of of bedaquiline, pretomanid, linezolid and moxifloxacin (BPaLM).
2021-10-212021-10-29 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/10/21/a-breakthrough-in-the-treatment-of-drug-resistant-tb-signals-shorter-and-safer-treatment-for-patients
  
Article
A Free State men’s health advocacy group is encouraging men and boys to consider undergoing medical circumcision instead of the traditional practice. And, in doing so, they won’t be placing themselves at risk after 13 initiates died in the Eastern Cape last year. Culturally, circumcision is regarded as a sacred rite of passage. Every year thousands of youths enter initiation schools where circumcision is one aspect of the practice. However, as the traditional circumcisions are not carried out in clinical conditions, initiates are oft
2021-10-212021-10-29 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/10/22/medical-circumcision-fs-group-urges-boys-to-reconsider/
  
Article
A new report, conducted by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, indicates that, after watching the episodes, young people were twice as likely to get tested for HIV. They were also twice as likely to know their status and to be aware of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, known as PrEP, a drug taken by HIV-negative people before sex, that reduces the risk of getting HIV. The Down South series is part of the multimedia campaign MTV Shuga, a long-running initiative that follows the lives of young people on the African continent.
2021-10-202021-10-22 12:00 AMUN Newshttps://news.un.org/en/story/2021/10/1103462
  
Article
COVID-19 has had a wide-ranging impact on all areas of society, leading to setbacks in health gains and efforts to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). The diversion of health system resources to address COVID-19 care led to a protracted disruption of essential health services. New barriers to accessing health care, such as restricted movements, reduced ability to pay and fear of infection, have posed additional and unprecedented challenges in many countries. The world has not learned from previous epidemics. Reacting to events as they occur, without adequately strengthening prevention and preparedness, meant that countries were caught unprepared for a pandemic of this speed and scale. COVID-19 has hit vulnerable populations particularly hard and exacerbated preexisting inequalities even further. This highlights the need for countries to take every opportunity to rebuild their health systems sustainably, more equitably and closer to communities.
2021-10-192021-10-22 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/19-10-2021-who-s-7-policy-recommendations-on-building-resilient-health-systems
  
Article
The AAP, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) and Children’s Hospital Association have declared a national emergency in children’s mental health, citing the serious toll of the COVID-19 pandemic on top of existing challenges. They are urging policymakers to take action swiftly to address the crisis. “Young people have endured so much throughout this pandemic and while much of the attention is often placed on its physical health consequences, we cannot overlook the escalating mental health crisis facing our patients,” AAP President Lee Savio Beers, M.D., FAAP, said in a statement. “Today's declaration is an urgent call to policymakers at all levels of government — we must treat this mental health crisis like the emergency it is.”
2021-10-192021-10-22 12:00 AMAAP Newshttps://www.aappublications.org/news/2021/10/19/children-mental-health-national-emergency-101921
  
Article
Breathing is enough to spread the bacteria that causes tuberculosis, research presented at a major conference on Tuesday shows, potentially forcing the medical community to rethink decades of containment strategy focusing on coughing alone. Using state-of-the-art equipment, at team at the University of Cape Town in South Africa measured the disease-causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in 39 people with TB. They looked at aerosols released during regular breathing, deep breathing and coughing and found that after five minutes all three produced particles containing the dangerous bacteria.
2021-10-192021-10-22 12:00 AMEWNhttps://ewn.co.za/2021/10/19/breathing-spreads-tuberculosis-bacteria-says-sa-research-team
  
Article
Using cutting-edge genomic sequencing techniques, researchers at the University of Oxford have identified almost all the genomic variation that gives people resistance to 13 of the most common tuberculosis (TB) drug treatments. The Comprehensive Resistance Prediction for Tuberculosis International Consortium (CRyPTIC) research project has collected the largest ever global dataset of clinical M. tuberculosis samples from across the world consisting of 15,211 samples from 27 countries on five continents. Using two key advances: a new quantitative test for drug resistance and a new approach which identifies all the genetic changes in a sample of drug-resistant TB bacteria the researchers have generated a unique dataset which the team has used to quantify how changes in the genetic code of M. tuberculosis reduce how well different drugs kill these bacteria that cause TB. These innovations, combined with ongoing work in the field, promise to profoundly improve how patients with TB are treated in the future.
2021-10-192021-10-22 12:00 AMNews Medicalhttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20211019/Researchers-identify-the-genetic-changes-responsible-for-drug-resistance-in-tuberculosis.aspx
  
Article
South African domestic worker Mabuyi Dlamini always dreaded the bumpy, day-long minibus journey she had to make each month to pick up her HIV medication from the nearest clinic in KwaZulu-Natal province. So when a mobile medical service carrying nurses, counsellors and supplies of antiretroviral drugs began visiting her district two years ago, she was relieved. During COVID-19 lockdowns that made travel impossible, it became a lifeline. "It has saved me time, money and my health," said Dlamini, 46, as she waited in line with farm workers next to the blue minivan on a dirt road bordered by thick, green sugarcane crops. HIV professionals battling to maintain services during the coronavirus pandemic have been adopting similarly innovative methods - from mailing out prescriptions to scaling up self-testing and video consultations. Their creative approach appears to have helped buck forecasts for a plunge in global HIV treatment rates, though international organisations say the coronavirus has still dealt a blow to the global fight against HIV.
2021-10-182021-10-22 12:00 AMThomas Reuters Foundation Newshttps://news.trust.org/item/20211018093741-zd72z
  
Article
Hundreds of patient volunteers from four continents have enrolled in a trial that aims to find safer, shorter, and effective treatments for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), an airborne, infectious disease that has grown resistant to standard medications. A group of scientists and clinicians led by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Partners In Health (PIH) and Interactive Research and Development (IRD) make up the endTB consortium conducting the groundbreaking study funded by Unitaid.  Started in 2017, this phase III randomised, controlled trial recruited 750 patients with MDR-TB across seven countries: Georgia, India, Kazakhstan, Lesotho, Pakistan, Peru, and South Africa. The trial compares five new treatment regimens for treating MDR-TB containing two of the three new TB drugs developed in recent years, bedaquiline and delamanid, in combination with other existing oral TB drugs. This new generation of drugs, which were developed after a nearly 50-year drought in new anti-TB drug classes, now allows for the development of radically shorter (6 or 9 months versus as long as two years), more tolerable, injection-free treatments for MDR-TB.
2021-10-182021-10-22 12:00 AMMédecins Sans Frontièreshttps://www.msf.org/patients-across-four-continents-enrol-multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis-trial
  
Article
According to Statistics South Africa, before Covid-19, about one in five households in South Africa reported not having enough to eat. In the immediate wake of the country’s Covid-19 lockdown, almost half of homes ran short of money for food, found the National Income Dynamics Study — Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey (Nids-cram). More than 200,000 people have gone hungry almost daily throughout South Africa’s Covid-19 epidemic. And while hunger stalks some in South Africa, obesity haunts others, shows the first (and so far only) national nutrition survey, published in 2013: Four out of 10 women and almost 12% of men in South Africa are living with obesity. 
2021-10-152021-10-22 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-10-15-delay-dilute-delegitimise-how-the-food-industry-shapes-what-you-eat-and-what-you-weigh/
  
Article
In her bright white office, Psychiatry Professor Jackie Hoare leans against a faux fur blanket on her sofa as she reflects on grief in a time of COVID-19. Even though we are socially distanced, our masks remain on, as Hoare is in daily contact with COVID-patients at Groote Schuur Hospital, the academic healthcare facility attached to the University of Cape Town (UCT). At the time of the interview, South Africa just exited its third wave, which saw Hoare inside COVID wards for the past three and a half months. “I’m managing the mental health of patients admitted with severe COVID pneumonia,” she says. “So I work with and am part of the frontline COVID team at Groote Schuur. I’m based in the high-care nasal flow oxygen units, across three different wards with about 55 beds, and also in our ICUs [Intensive Care Units] which expand, as required.”
2021-10-132021-10-18 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/10/13/mental-health-grief-loss-we-are-all-traumatised-says-psychiatrist-on-the-covid-19-frontlines/
  
Article
After giving birth four months ago, a Limpopo mom has decided to reach out to fellow mothers who are struggling to provide basics for their newborn babies. She has since launched a maternity bag drive ‘Helping a Sister Out’ to assist these young women and their infants. Tshepiso Molemela was one of many women in the maternity ward at the Mokopane Hospital in the Mahwelereng township in May. Her time there was an eye-opener for the 36-year-old who came to grips with the harsh realities of poverty in her community. Molemela realised that once some of her fellow ward mates were discharged from hospital, they’d really struggle.
2021-10-132021-10-18 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/10/13/help-a-sister-out-maternity-bag-drive-for-those-without/
  
Article
South Africa is now facing a mental health emergency that is the culmination of the simultaneous crises that are imploding the hopes, dreams and dignity of many who live in the country: the Covid crisis, the unemployment crisis, the inequality crisis, the femicide crisis, the poverty crisis. After someone dies by suicide friends often dissect the warning signs that they missed. A kind of post mortem of the soul takes place. At an aggregate societal level all the warning signs have been there, too, but we keep ignoring them. Our society is irrupting, but the powers that be can ignore it because the damage is (at this stage) mostly internal.
2021-10-122021-10-18 12:00 AMMaverick Citizenhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-10-12-south-africas-mental-health-epidemic-love-dont-live-here-anymore/
  
Article
A father of three, battling thyroid cancer, has highlighted the importance of taking action early and visiting a doctor regularly to check for any abnormalities. What makes this disease even more ominous, like most cancers, is the lack of any early symptoms. Dan Ramphalla regrets not seeking medical attention sooner. “I was very ignorant and never thought I’d be sick with a killer disease. I found about thyroid cancer late and if I had earlier, I might have been able to fight it,” said the 49-year-old. Ramphalla ignored early signs due to shyness and having to open up to others. He said that after a lump had developed, he hid from other people in the fear of being ridiculed.  “There was a pain at the front of my neck which would sometimes go up into my ears. At this stage, I didn’t think of seeing a doctor despite the pain and the lump which was growing. My voice also became hoarse,” said Ramphalla.
2021-10-062021-10-08 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/10/06/thyroid-cancer-checkyourneck-warns-dad-of-three/
  
Article
The Judicial Inquest into the deaths of mental healthcare users during the Life Esidimeni tragedy of 2016, began on 19 July 2021. After several false starts and procedural delays, with another six-week postponement announced this week, only four witnesses have testified before Judge Mmonoa Teffo in the South Gauteng Division of the High Court.
The fifth postponement since the start of the inquest signals a long road ahead for determining criminal accountability. Nonetheless, to achieve justice for the deaths of 144 mental healthcare users who were transferred from Life Esidimeni facilities into unlicensed NGOs during the Gauteng Mental Health Marathon Project of 2015-2016, the Inquest remains a crucial process, even if it is taking longer than originally expected.
2021-10-062021-10-08 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/10/06/life-esidimeni-inquest-a-recap-on-its-progress-and-what-to-expect/
  
Article
Even before the crisis, children and youth were already carrying the burden of mental health conditions and without significant investment in addressing them, according to the latest edition of its flagship report, the State of the World’s Children. Globally, more than one in seven adolescents aged 10–19 is estimated to live with a diagnosed mental disorder, while almost 46,000 die annually from suicide, which is among the top five causes of death for this demographic. Yet wide gaps persist between mental health needs and mental health funding, with only around two per cent of government health budgets going to mental health spending.
2021-10-052021-10-08 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/10/1102122
  
Article
WHO today published the new edition of its Model Lists of Essential Medicines and Essential Medicines for Children, which include new treatments for various cancers, insulin analogues and new oral medicines for diabetes, new medicines to assist people who want to stop smoking, and new antimicrobials to treat serious bacterial and fungal infections. The listings aim to address global health priorities, identifying the medicines that provide the greatest benefits, and which should be available and affordable for all. However, high prices for both new, patented medicines and older medicines, like insulin, continue to keep some essential medicines out of reach for many patients. “Diabetes is on the rise globally, and rising faster in low- and middle-income countries,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “Too many people who need insulin encounter financial hardship in accessing it or go without it and lose their lives. Including insulin analogues in the Essential Medicines List, coupled with efforts to ensure affordable access to all insulin products and expand use of biosimilars, is a vital step towards ensuring everyone who needs this life-saving product can access it.”
2021-10-012021-10-08 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/01-10-2021-who-prioritizes-access-to-diabetes-and-cancer-treatments-in-new-essential-medicines-lists
  
Article
Political instability and covid-19 are both straining Afghanistan’s already fragile health system, and organisations such as MSF cannot shoulder people’s healthcare needs alone, writes Tankred Stöbe. One of my MSF colleagues described the healthcare system in Afghanistan today as going from catastrophic to apocalyptic. If this sounds too pessimistic, we should not forget that healthcare in this war stricken country has been on life support for decades. It has been underfunded, under-resourced, and understaffed, and has failed to meet the critical needs of the population. It’s also hugely reliant on foreign donors.
2021-09-282021-10-01 12:00 AMBMJ Opinionhttps://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2021/09/28/a-country-on-life-support-deteriorating-medical-care-in-afghanistan/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_term=hootsuite&utm_content=sme&utm_campaign=usage
  
Article
If you pee during your shower, chances are you are not alone. Peeing in the shower is one of those things a lot of people have done at some point but may be reluctant to admit. It seems harmless, and for some it is a way to save water by not having to flush the toilet, but a doctor has warned people against urinating in the shower. TikTok users were thrown off when Dr Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas, a doctor of physical therapy at Boston Urology, posted a video titled: “Why you shouldn't pee in the shower”.
2021-09-282021-10-01 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/health/watch-admit-it-you-pee-in-the-shower-but-this-doctor-says-its-a-bad-idea-8b4177aa-55d5-42c3-a126-42e14b5ad912?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1632826598-1
  
Article
Cansa is concerned about the increased number of men being diagnosed with late-stage cancer and urges men to go for their regular prostate examinations. Professor Michael Herbst, a health specialist at the Cancer Association of South Africa (Cansa), says many younger men – even in their late 30s and early 40s – are being diagnosed with prostate cancer. According to him, prostate cancer can therefore no longer be perceived as a cancer affecting only older men. Reasons why you need to go for regular prostate check-ups: Statistics don’t lie.
2021-09-272021-10-01 12:00 AMThe Citizenhttps://www.citizen.co.za/lifestyle/health-lifestyle/2633106/prostate-cancer-why-you-need-to-get-checked-annually/
  
Article
UNAIDS, the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) came together this week to co-host an event on the powerful partnership between the three organizations, countries and communities. The event, held on the sidelines of the 76th session of the United Nations General Assembly, highlighted the millions of lives saved through the partnership but warned that COVID-19 has hit hard and risks derailing efforts to end AIDS by 2030. “We are in one of the most challenging moments in the history of HIV and global health,” said Winnie Byanyima, the Executive Director of UNAIDS. “We must act urgently. Our partnerships are strong and flexible and we must use what we have learned together to prevent a resurgent AIDS pandemic, to end inequalities and to tackle COVID-19.” COVID-19 has had a hugely damaging impact on HIV services over the past 18 months. Peter Sands, the Executive Director of the Global Fund, said that the number of mothers receiving prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services dropped by 4.5%, the number of people reached with HIV prevention programmes declined by 11%, HIV testing declined by 22% and voluntary medical male circumcision for HIV prevention dropped by 27%. “We were off track against our targets before COVID-19 hit and COVID-19 has knocked us further off track,” he said. “It’s going to be incredibly difficult to get fully back on track on HIV until we have got on top of COVID-19.”
2021-09-242021-10-01 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2021/september/20210924_unaids-pepfar-globalfund-event
  
Article
Reflecting on the mammoth issue of corruption casting a shadow over South Africa’s health sector, Dr Kenneth Jacobs stresses the importance of safety nets for whistle-blowers, and of establishing technological systems to enforce accountability. More than most, Jacobs is in a position to do something about these issues. Last month, Jacobs, a member of Parliament for the African National Congress (ANC), was elected chairperson of the National Assembly’s Portfolio Committee on Health. Among other things, he will play a pivotal role in deliberations on the National Health Insurance (NHI) Bill. Public hearings have been underway in the health portfolio committee until recess on September 10. The NHI public hearings so far (they will continue later in the year) have flagged corruption as a major concern, particularly pertaining to a centralised NHI fund.
2021-09-222021-10-01 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/09/22/interview-kenneth-jacobs-new-chair-of-parliaments-portfolio-committee-on-health/
  
Article
The truck had the name of a funeral home on it. But instead of a soothing thought that might double as a company slogan, the message on the side read: "Don't get vaccinated." The black truck advertising for "Wilmore Funeral Home" delivered that blunt and unexpected message on Sunday to football fans in downtown Charlotte as they headed to watch the Carolina Panthers play the New Orleans Saints. Many employers and public health officials are searching for ways to get more people vaccinated against Covid-19, using everything from money and free food to even lavish vacations and VIP Super Bowl tickets. The fully vaccinated account for just 54.7% of the total US population. One Charlotte ad agency, however, decided to ditch traditional marketing strategies and take matters into their own hands.
2021-09-222021-10-01 12:00 AMCNNhttps://edition.cnn.com/2021/09/21/us/covid-vaccine-billboard-funeral-home-ad-agency-trnd/index.html
  
Article
When it comes to good health, sugary drinks are bad news. Scientists working in this field agree that regularly consuming sugar-sweetened beverages – such as fizzy sodas, juice drinks with added sugar and energy drinks – is a major driver of obesity and chronic, non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common among adults, is an impairment in the way the body regulates and uses sugar and results in too much sugar circulating in your bloodstream. This can lead to disorders of the circulatory, nervous and immune systems. One way to get people to drink fewer sugary drinks is for governments to implement sugar taxes. South Africa implemented a sugar tax in 2018 by charging the manufacturers of sugary drinks a levy on the sale of their products.
2021-09-212021-09-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/health-news-south-africa/2021-09-21-the-sugar-tax-is-working-now-double-it/
  
Article
Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in the world with a rising number of stunted children. Among many of the continent’s low- and middle-income countries, a healthy diet is neither easily affordable nor accessible, leading to poor diets deficient in key vitamins and minerals. As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to severely affect the global economy, and alter the social and cultural fabric of humanity, another threat is on the horizon. According to the UN World Food Programme, more than 950 million people across 93 countries do not have enough to eat. In May, as the world marked World Nutrition Day, looming or present famine was reported in parts of Ethiopia, Madagascar, South Sudan, Yemen, Nigeria and Burkina Faso.
2021-09-212021-09-23 12:00 AMMaverick Citizenhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-09-21-stunted-growth-prioritise-investment-in-nutrition-or-risk-robbing-africa-of-its-future/
  
Article
With September being Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, experts are calling for more awareness to be created around the disease, as most cancers are highly treatable in the early stages. Currently, between 800 to 1 000 children in South Africa are diagnosed with cancer every year, however, the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA) estimates that half of children with cancer in the country are never diagnosed. On a global scale, the World Health Organisation (WHO) reveals that more than 400 000 children and adolescents below the age of 20 are diagnosed with various types of cancer annually, with the most common types of childhood cancers being leukaemia, brain cancer, lymphoma and solid tumours, such as neuroblastoma and Wilms tumours. “Cancer occurs in people of all ages and can affect any part of the body. It begins with genetic change in single cells that then grow into a mass (tumour), invades other parts of the body and causes harm and death if left untreated. Unlike cancer in adults, most of the childhood cancer do not have a known cause,” said the WHO.
2021-09-202021-09-23 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/09/20/cancer-in-children-early-diagnosis-treatment-key-to-survival/
  
Article
When the minister of social development introduced the 2020 Children’s Amendment Bill “to further provide for funding of early childhood development programmes”, it was seen as a step in the right direction to bring about meaningful change in the sector. The Bill has, unfortunately, brought about more uncertainty and instability. Early childhood development (ECD) is defined as a comprehensive approach to programmes and policies for children from birth to seven or eight years of age. Its purpose is to protect the rights of children, allowing them to develop their full cognitive, emotional, social and physical potential.
2021-09-182021-09-23 12:00 AMMail & Guardian https://mg.co.za/opinion/2021-09-18-the-childrens-amendment-bill-still-leaves-many-children-behind/
  
Article
A look back at the early days of AIDS activism highlights stark parallels with the global response to COVID-19. Previously unseen images from the early 1990s of AIDS activists campaigning for life-saving medicines show that, with slogans such as “Dead from drug profiteers” and “AIDS $ now”, the AIDS activists of yesterday mirror today’s activists in their demand for equal access to COVID-19 vaccines. However, the photos also highlight how, 40 years after the discovery of the first AIDS cases, the world is repeating the same mistakes in its response to COVID-19, as inequalities continue to be the driving force of infections and deaths.
2021-09-172021-09-23 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2021/september/20210917_forty-years-of-campaigning-for-equal-access-to-life-saving-medicines
  
Article
South Africa has a long way to go in building healthcare management systems that reduce risk to patients. That’s the word from Dr Siphiwe Mndaweni, head of the Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC), on Friday, which is World Patient Safety Day. Under the National Health Act, the OHSC is charged with ensuring health establishments – from major hospitals to clinics and practices of doctors and other health professionals – comply with legislated health standards. “Many standards we are tasked with enforcing are designed specifically to pre-empt and prevent adverse medical events from occurring,” said Mndaweni.
2021-09-172021-09-23 12:00 AMDispatch Livehttps://www.dispatchlive.co.za/news/2021-09-17-health-standards-body-says-south-africa-still-far-from-providing-safe-healthcare-for-all/
  
Article
New parents are experiencing an added mental health strain during Covid-19's protracted lockdown, a new South African study has revealed. According to the study by a team of University of Cape Town (UCT) researchers, parents with children born during lockdown were less likely to have their preferred choice of birth method, had worse self-reported birth experiences, were less likely to have skin-to-skin contact with their babies after birth and were frequently unable to have someone at their birth that they had wanted to be there — all adding up to their mental health woes. Researchers said that, as a result, new parents are experiencing psychological strain and symptoms of depression are common.
2021-09-162021-09-23 12:00 AMSowetan Livehttps://www.sowetanlive.co.za/news/south-africa/2021-09-16-new-parents-hit-by-lockdown-blues-uct-study-finds/
  
Article
While it is still unclear what caused the fire at the Christiana District Hospital in the North West province last week, residents are concerned about what this means for their health needs. Millions of rands’ worth of infrastructure and equipment were destroyed by the fire that left a big part of the Hospital in ruins on 8 September. The North West Department of Health says it still awaits a forensic report which will determine the cause of the fire and the exact costs of the damages. The department could not give a timeframe for when the findings are expected.
2021-09-162021-09-23 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/09/16/christiana-community-concerned-over-access-to-health-services-after-hospital-fire/
  
Article
The first ever World report on hearing was launched in 2021, as a technical guide outlining the ongoing shifts in the global epidemiology of hearing loss, capturing available solutions and current challenges for ear and hearing care and also establishing priorities to be addressed. It highlights the link between addressing hearing loss and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. 
The rational for hearing screening across the life course is well outlined in the report. The report shows that increasing hearing screening and early intervention coverage during the next 10 years requires an additional annual per capita investment of US$ 1.33. The resulting health gain during the 10-year period would avert nearly 130 million DALYs (disability adjusted life years), benefit 1.4 billion people and yield a return of nearly US$ 16 for each 1 dollar invested. The World report on hearing recommends that WHO Member States take urgent and evidence-based policy action to prevent, identify and rehabilitate hearing loss. To render technical support to the Member States in implementing the recommendation of the world report into, WHO has developed the HEARING screening: considerations for implementation. This handbook provides technical guidance required for establishing evidence-based programmes for hearing screening facilitating early identification and interventions to address hearing loss and related ear diseases in target groups.
2021-09-152021-09-17 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news-room/events/detail/2021/09/15/default-calendar/launch-of-hearing-screening-considerations-for-recommendations
  
Article
Nine in ten SA doctors believe healthcare professionals must be able to admit errors, apologise and learn from mistakes without fear of blame, regulatory action or criminal charges in the event of an adverse incident with a patient. This is according to a survey of 590 doctors conducted by the Medical Protection Society (MPS), which represents 30,000 healthcare professionals in SA. On Wednesday the society said the survey results bring into sharp focus the need for government to aid a shift to a more open and learning culture in healthcare in which healthcare professionals are supported to discuss and learn from mistakes, and patients are subsequently better protected and better informed. The organisation said fear of blame, regulatory action or even criminal charges after an adverse incident are a barrier to open disclosure “which must be broken down”. Dr Graham Howarth, head of MPS medical services Africa, said: “Doctors want to do their very best for patients, but medicine is not an exact science.
2021-09-152021-09-17 12:00 AMSunday Timeshttps://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2021-09-15-sa-doctors-say-admitting-errors-without-fear-of-blame-is-key-to-improving-patient-safety-survey/
  
Article
The NHS is launching the world's biggest trial of a potentially life-saving blood test that can detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear. Some 140,000 volunteers in eight areas of England will be recruited to try the Galleri test, which is already available in the US. The test can detect cancers that are not routinely screened for and it can find where the disease is coming from in the body with a high degree of accuracy. NHS chief executive Amanda Pritchard said: "This quick and simple blood test could mark the beginning of a revolution in cancer detection and treatment here and around the world. "By finding cancer before signs and symptoms even appear, we have the best chance of treating it and we can give people the best possible chance of survival." The NHS trial will invite people from different backgrounds and ethnicities who are aged between 50 and 77 to take part. They cannot have had a cancer diagnosis in the last three years.
2021-09-132021-09-17 12:00 AMSky Newshttps://news.sky.com/story/nhs-begins-worlds-largest-trial-of-blood-test-for-more-than-50-types-of-cancer-12406773
  
Article
Perspective published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition argues the root causes of the obesity epidemic are more related to what we eat rather than how much we eat. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that obesity affects more than 40% of American adults, placing them at higher risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer. The USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020 – 2025 further tells us that losing weight “requires adults to reduce the number of calories they get from foods and beverages and increase the amount expended through physical activity.” This approach to weight management is based on the century-old energy balance model which states that weight gain is caused by consuming more energy than we expend. In today’s world, surrounded by highly palatable, heavily marketed, cheap processed foods, it’s easy for people to eat more calories than they need, an imbalance that is further exacerbated by today’s sedentary lifestyles. By this thinking, overeating, coupled with insufficient physical activity, is driving the obesity epidemic. On the other hand, despite decades of public health messaging exhorting people to eat less and exercise more, rates of obesity and obesity-related diseases have steadily risen.
2021-09-132021-09-17 12:00 AMAmerican Society for Nutritionhttps://scitechdaily.com/scientists-claim-overeating-is-not-the-primary-cause-of-obesity-point-to-more-effective-weight-loss-strategies/
  
Article
The British Medical Association (BMA) has dropped its opposition to assisted dying and adopted a neutral stance on the issue. The doctors’ union, which represents about 150,000 medics, voted to change its official position following a debate by members at its annual representative meeting in London. It had opposed legalising assisted dying since 2006. A BMA survey in 2020 found for the first time that doctors in support of a law change outnumbered those against. The poll, which heard from almost 29,000 doctors and medical students, showed that 50% personally believed doctors should be able to prescribe life-ending drugs for patients to take themselves – 39% opposed this and 11% were undecided. Polls have found a majority of voters back a change. The landmark decision by the BMA, one of Britain’s most influential medical bodies, is likely to be seized upon by campaigners seeking to change the law. The Royal College of Physicians, the oldest medical college in England, dropped its opposition to assisted dying and adopted a neutral stance on the issue in 2019.
2021-09-132021-09-17 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/sep/14/bma-drops-opposition-assisted-dying-adopts-neutral-stance
  
Article
Bhekisisa editor-in-chief Mia Malan speaks to Doctors Without Borders’ Candice Sehoma to find out why (Johnson & Johnson) J&J is so slow to deliver South Africa’s COVID-19 vaccines. This episode also looks at how HIV prevention pills and injections work, how much they cost and where they can be accessed in South Africa (or not). Yogan Pillay, country director for the Clinton Health Access Initiative and Linda-Gail Bekker from the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre at the University of Cape Town unpack the science and policies behind these HIV prevention methods.
2021-09-102021-09-10 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/multimedia/2021-09-09-health-hub-why-is-jj-moving-at-a-snails-pace-with-our-vaccine-deliveries-and-how-does-an-hiv-prevention-pill-work/
  
Article
Young people in South Africa have been particularly hard hit by the country’s spiralling unemployment rate, with many turning to substance abuse and developing depression as they see no way out of their situation. Millions of young South Africans are currently struggling to find employment, despite months and even years of searching, and joblessness has been linked to health problems such as depression, suicide and substance abuse. “Honestly, being unemployed is depressing, especially waking up in the morning and knowing well that there is nothing you can do. All I do is to wonder where I’m going to get my next cent,” said 29-years-old Matome Charles Rasekgala. Not being able to find a job has left him depressed, with no hope of finding employment, despite holding a bachelor’s degree, a computer diploma, a driver’s licence and a security certificate.
2021-09-102021-09-23 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/09/10/unemployment-sa-youth-battle-countrys-other-pandemic/
  
Article
Men over the age of 35 in South Africa are not taking up COVID-19 vaccines at the same rate as women. Only about 40% of those who had been vaccinated by 13 August were men, according to a health department report. This is an unusual pattern. In countries where vaccine uptake is recorded by sex, there is a slight trend towards men being more likely to get vaccinated than women. So, why are South African men not getting vaccinated for COVID-19? There is currently no research on the specific question. Nevertheless it’s possible to gain some insights by looking at research into men’s attitudes to HIV testing and engaging with the health system. There are, of course, significant differences between HIV testing and treatment and COVID-19. But research around HIV might point to some potential reasons why men may not be accessing COVID-19 vaccination
2021-09-082021-09-10 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/opinion/2021-09-08-can-hiv-lessons-tell-us-why-sa-men-are-so-slow-to-get-a-covid-jab/
  
Article
As a virologist, I’ve spent the past year or more studying the novel coronavirus that has upended all our lives. Communicating our work to the public and speaking to the media is an important part of my job, and I’ve always tried to be clear and accurate about the science: I believe the available vaccines against Covid-19 are safe, and they are our best route back to a more normal way of living. I’ve been concerned about the anti-vaccination movement since before the pandemic. But I never imagined that my own work could actually be part of their misinformation arsenal. So I was shocked to discover that a recent TV interview I did for ITV London News had been seized on by anti-vax and conspiracy activists and now has thousands of likes, shares and retweets across social media.
2021-09-072021-09-10 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/sep/07/virologist-work-anti-vaxxers-covid
  
Article
Doctors and nurses have been found to be the most trusted sources for vaccine advice needed by South Africans in a study that was funded by the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) and the Solidarity Fund. The research conducted Ask Africa found that 43% of the polled population said they would go to doctors and nurses when they needed advice and information about Covid-19 vaccines. The research, which looked at public perceptions, will be used to inform the government’s communication strategy on the vaccine roll-out. About 37% of the respondents said they trusted the government while health experts were trusted by 35%, and the World Health Organisation (WHO) was trusted by 26% of the population. The chief executive of Ask Africa, Andrea Rademeyer, presented the findings at a virtual briefing on Monday, 6 September.
2021-09-062021-09-10 12:00 AMMail & Guardian https://mg.co.za/coronavirus-essentials/2021-09-06-doctors-and-nurses-are-most-trusted-sources-for-vaccine-information/
  
Article
Little is known about the number of people in South Africa who are living with rare diseases. In fact, there is no recognised definition for rare disease in the country, contributing to inadequate record-keeping and very little data on prevalence, treatment options, and support structures. This is compounded by a lack of capacity in both the public and private sectors to recognise and test for rare diseases and the impossibly high price tag associated with some of the medicines available to treat them, which often are not available in SA.
2021-09-062021-09-10 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/09/06/in-depth-what-happens-to-people-in-sa-who-have-rare-diseases/
  
Article
Only a quarter of countries worldwide have a national policy, strategy or plan for supporting people with dementia and their families, according to the WHO’s ‘Global status report on the public health response to dementia’, released today. Half of these countries are in WHO’s European Region, with the remainder split between the other Regions. Yet even in Europe, many plans are expiring or have already expired, indicating a need for renewed commitment from governments. At the same time, the number of people living with dementia is growing according to the report: WHO estimates that more than 55 million people (8.1 % of women and 5.4% of men over 65 years) are living with dementia. This number is estimated to rise to 78 million by 2030 and to 139 million by 2050. Dementia is caused by a variety of diseases and injuries that affect the brain, such as Alzheimer’s disease or stroke. It affects memory and other cognitive functions, as well as the ability to perform everyday tasks.
2021-09-022021-09-17 12:00 AMWorld Health Organizationhttps://www.who.int/news/item/02-09-2021-world-failing-to-address-dementia-challenge
  
Article
An antiretroviral injection administered every two months has been shown to be highly effective in preventing people from getting HIV in two large trials. In addition, a number of acceptability analyses and civil society engagement have found that people like the product and are eager for it to become available. Sibongile Tshabalala, national chairperson of the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC), tells Spotlight that groups they consult with all would prefer an injection over a pill (oral PrEP]. “They ask us how long are we going to wait to have access to it?” The new two-monthly injectable product referred to by Tshabalala is a long-acting, injectable version of the antiretroviral medicine cabotegravir – commonly known as CAB LA. CAB LA is not yet available in South Africa for procurement but has been trialled here as part of two large-scale phase 3 multi-country trials: HPTN 083 and HPTN 084. Both trials – one in cisgender gay men, men who have sex with men and transwomen, and another in cisgender women – were stopped early after evidence showed that CAB LA is more effective than daily HIV prevention pills in preventing HIV infection.
2021-09-012021-09-10 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-09-01-what-will-it-take-to-bring-hiv-prevention-injections-to-sas-clinics
  
Article
Women’s Month in South Africa is celebrated in August. It commemorates the significant role held by women in South African society and celebrates the accomplishments of the 20,000 women who marched to the Union Buildings in August of 1956. The march was held in protest of the amendments to the Urban Areas Act, a piece of legislation enacted to regulate the movements of non-white South Africans during the Apartheid era. Yet every year, during this month, as a South African woman, I am reminded that this commemoration is in perpetual memory of the dead. Nosicelo Mtebeni, was killed during Women’s Month. Her limbs were found on August 19 in a plastic bag disposed of in the street. Her torso was found in a suitcase, while her head and hands were found in the house she shared with her boyfriend, Alutha Pasile. Pasile is in custody and remanded until September 28. The same is true for 28-year-old Ndivhuwo Munyai. Munyai was shot on Sunday, August 22, allegedly by her husband a police sergeant in Thohoyondau, Limpopo Province who had apparently taken a gun to his wife, and then turned it on himself in a murder suicide.
2021-08-302021-09-03 12:00 AMHuman Rights Watchhttps://www.hrw.org/news/2021/08/30/killing-doesnt-stop-during-south-africas-womens-month
  
Article
Last week on a busy day of meetings, newly minted Minister of Health Dr Joe Phaahla sat down to talk about his priorities and approach to what must be the most difficult ministry in government. In the middle of Covid-19, corruption allegations about his predecessor and the murder of health department whistle-blower Babita Deokoran, the minister had plenty on his mind. Phaahla’s CV attests to the fact that he is no stranger to government or health. He’s been a health activist for 40 years, since he left school in 1976, a deputy minister since 2009 and the deputy minister of health from May 2014, first in the shadow of Dr Aaron Motsoaledi and later under Dr Zweli Mkhize. Now, with about 30 months to go to national elections in 2024, he finally gets to take hold of the reins and his chance to shine as a minister. But will he? Phaahla says the most immediate challenges are of course the ongoing Covid-19 crisis and the roll-out of the vaccination programme. Phaahla said his objective was still to have up to 60% of people vaccinated by the end of the year. But rather than focus on the Covid crisis, which takes most of our attention, I wanted Phaahla to talk about pre-existing health challenges that have been eclipsed by Covid-19, but have not gone away.
2021-08-302021-09-03 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-08-30-we-are-in-uncharted-waters-but-we-will-get-out-of-it-working-together-says-health-minister-joe-phaahla/
  
Article
The number of adults aged 30–79 years with hypertension has increased from 650 million to 1.28 billion in the last thirty years, according to the first comprehensive global analysis of trends in hypertension prevalence, detection, treatment and control, led by Imperial College London and WHO, and published today in The Lancet. Nearly half these people did not know they had hypertension. Hypertension significantly increases the risk of heart, brain and kidney diseases, and is one of the top causes of death and disease throughout the world. It can be easily detected through measuring blood pressure, at home or in a health centre, and can often be treated effectively with medications that are low cost. The study, conducted by a global network of physicians and researchers, covered the period 1990–2019. It used blood pressure measurement and treatment data from over 100 million people aged 30–79 years in 184 countries, together covering 99% of the global population, which makes it the most comprehensive review of global trends in hypertension to date.
2021-08-252021-08-27 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/25-08-2021-more-than-700-million-people-with-untreated-hypertension
  
Article
Shortages of doctors and nurses at hospitals in the Eastern Cape is a well-known systemic issue that creates challenges for access to quality healthcare. These staff shortages, along with other systemic challenges, are fuelling the province’s huge medico-legal claims bill, which in turn depletes much-needed funds that can be better invested in improving health services. Compounded by COVID-19, the understaffing of doctors and nurses in Livingstone Hospital is one that the Provincial Department of Health has long been warned about. Most recently, in a report following an investigation into conditions at healthcare facilities in the province, the Office of the Public Protector found that “the administration of health by the [department] at Livingstone Hospital does not accord with the obligations imposed by the Constitution and the law”. Acute staff shortages, the report found, were one shortcoming of the health system that contributed to the department’s failure to meet its constitutional and statutory duties. In remedial action, the Deputy Public Protector recommended that the Head of the Provincial Department of Health was to ensure that the filling of other critical positions at the hospital was to be prioritised.
2021-08-252021-09-03 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/08/25/opinion-transparency-and-action-urgently-needed-on-eastern-cape-staffing-challenges/
  
Article
The fate of two of the Northern Cape Health Department’s top officials, who were arrested for fraud and corruption, remains uncertain despite calls from some opposition parties and trade unions to suspend them immediately. Acting Head of Department for Health in the Northern Cape Dr Dion Theys (as we explain lower down his current position is unclear) and the department’s chief financial officer Daniel Gaborone appeared in the Kimberly Magistrate’s Court this week. The charges relate to allegations around the issuing of a personal protective equipment (PPE) tender valued at R43 million without following the correct procurement procedures last year.
2021-08-252021-09-03 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/08/26/northern-cape-government-yet-to-decide-on-fate-of-senior-health-officials-facing-fraud-charges/
  
Article
Cannabis has been around for an awfully long time. There is evidence that it was being used in China as a medicine as long ago as 2600 BC, and I’m fairly sure that at least some Chinese people would have been using it recreationally. But what has happened over the last few years is unprecedented, with an enormous surge in interest in cannabis-related products, to the point where it is being added to everything from dog food to chocolate to shampoo. The problem with all this hype is there is remarkably little evidence about genuine effectiveness. It is certainly an interesting plant, containing more than 500 different compounds, many of which interact with ‘cannabinoid’ receptors in our bodies. One reason why cannabis has such wide and varying effects is because our bodies are riddled with these receptors, which help regulate sleep, stress, pain, appetite, memory and mood. This in turn helps explain why people are now using cannabis products to treat a whole range of different conditions, but the two that stand out are chronic pain and severe childhood epilepsy.
2021-08-242021-08-27 12:00 AMScience Focushttps://www.sciencefocus.com/the-human-body/dr-michael-mosley-cbd-health/
  
Article
Public confidence in science is built on trust at every level, from faith in the integrity of researchers and their data to the regulatory bodies that guarantee the safety of the product. A lack of transparency and reluctance to share information erodes public trust in interventions such as vaccines. This trust is especially important during the COVID pandemic and is lacking when it comes to Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine because of a lack of public data about the jab.
2021-08-242021-08-27 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/health-news-south-africa/2021-08-24-a-hamburger-recipe-vaccine-science-edition/
  
Article
Professor Cyril Dim, a member of the Director-General’s Expert Group on Cervical Cancer Elimination, recently encouraged the Catholic Bishops Conference of Nigeria to join in advocating for the elimination of cervical cancer. Presenting on the Global strategy and the Cervical Cancer Elimination Initiative, Professor Dim highlighted the role that bishops can play in encouraging government action, raising awareness within communities, and combatting vaccine inequity to eliminate cervical cancer for women and girls throughout Nigeria. 
2021-08-232021-08-27 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/23-08-2021-calling-catholic-bishops-to-join-the-movement-for-cervical-cancer-elimination-in-nigeria
  
Article
Last month the National Department of Health’s Director of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis (DR-TB), Dr Norbert Ndjeka, received an honorary doctorate from the University of Cape Town for his work in the field of DR-TB treatment. Dr Norbert Ndjeka, Director of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis (DR-TB) at the National Department of Health, recently received an honorary doctorate from the University of Cape Town’s health sciences faculty in recognition of his work. Ndjeka has been in his current position since 2009 and some of his accomplishments saw drastic changes in the lives of people suffering from DR-TB.
2021-08-232021-08-27 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/08/23/tb-expert-dr-norbert-ndjeka-receives-recognition-for-his-work/
  
Article
Patients can resume their chronic treatment after the St Mary’s Hospital in Mariannhill in KwaZulu-Natal announced that a letter confirming their unemployed status is required in order to qualify for free medication. A letter from the Department of Labour will allow patients to get back on track after it was discovered by Health-e News that patients had stopped collecting their treatment in fear of owing the hospital thousands. Zandile Mseleku, from Dossenhoek, stopped taking her treatment in June this year. The 41-year-old said she decided to stop visiting St Mary’s to collect her medication for her heart condition as well as blood pressure pills because the system showed she owed the hospital a lot of money. “No one at the hospital told me to stop collecting my treatment. I am the one who decided to stop because I knew that if I continued, my debt would increase,” said Mseleku. St Mary’s Hospital requires every patient who visits to pay a fee of R40 for services rendered.
2021-08-232021-08-27 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/08/23/st-marys-hospital-urges-patients-to-resume-chronic-treatment/
  
Article
Having to collect one’s medicines at overcrowded public sector clinics with long queues can be time-consuming, disruptive, and, these days, may expose one to a risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2. Fortunately, South Africa has a programme that allows people on chronic medicines to collect their medicines at pick-up points closer to home, such as at participating private pharmacies. The programme, called CCMDD (Central Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution), is not only convenient for users but also takes significant pressure off public sector clinics.
2021-08-202021-08-27 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/08/20/how-well-is-sas-chronic-medicines-distribution-system-working/
  
Article
A recent report by Ritshidze, a community monitoring project started by organisations representing people living with HIV, paints a grim picture of public healthcare services in North West province. The report, titled North West: State of Health, asserts that the province’s public healthcare system has been in a state of crisis for many years.
2021-08-192021-08-20 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/08/19/medicines-stockouts-once-again-reported-in-north-west/
  
Article
Gender-based violence (GBV) is one of the many tragic sideshows playing out in the background as the COVID-19 pandemic takes centere stage. With South Africa having one of the highest rates of violence against women and girls in the world, Health-e News spoke to a few men in Mahikeng in the North West to find out how they are playing their part to reduce the impact of GBV. While the country celebrates #WomensMonth, it’s important to question whether we should celebrate this at all given the statistics. South African women are left to navigate life in fear of domestic, sexual and intimate partner violence on a daily basis. No means no!
2021-08-192021-08-27 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2021/08/19/gender-based-violence-time-to-call-out-our-brothers-friends/
  
Article
It’s been over a year since COVID-19 first hit South Africa. Since then, many people have been living in constant fear and many have lost loved ones. Frontline healthcare workers had no choice but to face their fears if they were to keep doing the life-saving work they were trained for. Amy Green, for Spotlight and Health-e News, and colleagues explore the emotional toll that South Africa’s third wave of COVID-19 is taking on healthcare workers. It’s been over a year since COVID-19 first hit South Africa. Since then, almost everyone has been living in fear. But frontline healthcare workers are hit hardest, placing themselves last to save the lives of others. Frontline healthcare workers have been taking considerable strain, especially during the third wave. They work long hours, often without the necessary resources causing them physical and especially emotional harm. “I dread going [to] work on Mondays. The sight of dead bodies being wheeled out of a ward on a stretcher just kills the spirit and breaks one down. It’s very depressing,” says 30-year-old Mandisa Majavu*.
2021-08-182021-08-27 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/08/18/healthcare-workers-we-are-living-in-the-shadows-of-death/
  
Article
A new, more effective treatment for schistosomiasis could be on the horizon after researchers discovered a series of new drug compounds that are highly effective against the three main species of parasitic worms that cause the disease, according to new research in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. The research was conducted by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and the drug discovery company Salvensis. The drug candidates are now being explored by Merck Global Health Institute as a potential new treatment for human schistosomiasis. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), schistosomiasis, also known as Bilharzia, affects almost 240 million people worldwide, and more than 700 million live in endemic areas. The infection occurs when people come into contact with fresh water containing the larvae of the schistosomes through swimming, washing and collecting drinking water. The larvae penetrate human’s skin and the worms then mature within the body’s blood vessels, and lay eggs which become trapped in the body’s tissues. The body’s reaction to these eggs causes inflammation and damage to various organs, notably the liver, lungs, intestine and bladder. This leads to symptoms including rashes, fever, myalgia, respiratory issues, widespread morbidity and sometimes death. Children who are repeatedly infected can develop anaemia, malnutrition, and learning difficulties. Dr Helena Helmby, Associate Professor at LSHTM and study author, said: “Schistosomiasis is a serious disease that mainly affects populations in low-income countries. Currently the only treatment is the drug praziquantel, which at a high dose is effective against adult worms, but not against juvenile worms so repeat treatment is required. The reliance on this single drug means experts are concerned this will lead to the worms developing drug resistance. New, more effective treatments are urgently needed.”
2021-08-182021-08-27 12:00 AMLondon School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicinehttps://www.lshtm.ac.uk/newsevents/news/2021/new-series-compounds-discovered-could-treat-parasitic-worm-disease
  
Article
CANSA’s Smart Choice Endorsement Program will award a seal of recognition to products that have health benefits and reduce the risk of cancer, in a bid to promote healthy living among South African consumers. The Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA) hopes to promote a healthy lifestyle among South Africans and lower their risk of developing cancer, through its revitalised seal of recognition initiative that endorses products which may assist in reducing the cancer risk and are free of all known carcinogens and toxins. According to CANSA nutritional expect Megan Pentz-Kluyts, it is important for South Africans to have information about products that offer health benefits when they go shopping.
2021-08-162021-08-20 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/08/16/cansa-seal-of-recognition-aims-to-promote-health-living/
  
Article
Trade union Solidarity has slammed proposed regulations that will introduce a ‘Certificate of Need’ for healthcare practitioners in South Africa. In terms of the new regulations, all healthcare practitioners must apply for a certificate that will enable them to practice. They will then be prescribed where and how they may practice, the union said. Solidarity said it vehemently opposess these regulations which, as a result of the implementation of the certificate, will threaten ownership rights of private practices. “The state only has one goal in mind and that is to centralise health care in its entirety,” said Henru Krüger, sector head of the professional guild at Solidarity.
2021-08-162021-08-20 12:00 AMBusiness Techhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/lifestyle/513188/a-controversial-nhi-focused-change-could-hit-south-africa-as-doctors-look-at-leaving/
  
Article
As a child, Professor Michèle Ramsay never thought of a future in academia or receiving an ‘Oscar in Science’. She was interested in climbing trees and pretending trees were spaceships. By the time she started her first year at the University of Stellenbosch, Ramsay had lived in four countries – South Africa (Vereeniging), Mexico, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Her father was an engineer and the family followed him to where his job took him. It is these experiences that gave Ramsay valuable insight into the diversity of people and which shaped her worldview.
2021-08-162021-08-20 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/08/16/women-in-health-its-in-the-genes-for-professor-michele-ramsay/
  
Article
Communities in Durban are recovering after the recent riots. At the same time, the role of social media and fake news in fuelling animosity between communities is becoming clearer. The Phoenix Massacre hashtag was among those that drove anti-Indian sentiment. It will now form part of a Human Rights Commission investigation into the unrest. As groups of looters raided shops and made their way into some neighbourhoods, communities took it upon themselves to protect lives and livelihoods. The absence of police and law and order gave rise to vigilantism and people were murdered. Police have arrested 22 suspects who have already appeared in court. One of the main drivers of public conversation about the unrest in Durban has been social media. The Digital Forensics Research Lab has studied the Phoenix Massacre hashtag, which was coined very early on during the riots. The Digital Forensics Research Lab's Jean Le Roux said, “the way that the social media scene weaponised that by taking old videos, decontextualised videos and try and inflame the situation on the ground.”
2021-08-152021-08-20 12:00 AMeNCAhttps://www.enca.com/news/crime-sa-fake-news-fuels-social-media-hysteria
  
Article
The Ministry of Health of Cote d’Ivoire today confirmed the country’s first case of Ebola since 1994. This came after the Institut Pasteur in Cote d’Ivoire confirmed the Ebola Virus Disease in samples collected from a patient, who was hospitalized in the commercial capital of Abidjan, after arriving from Guinea. Initial investigations found that the patient had travelled to Cote d’Ivoire by road and arrived in Abidjan on 12 August. The patient was admitted to a hospital after experiencing a fever and is currently receiving treatment. Guinea experienced a four-month long Ebola outbreak, which was declared over on the 19 June 2021. There is no indication that the current case in Cote d’Ivoire is linked to the earlier outbreak in Guinea. Further investigation and genomic sequencing will identify the strain and determine if there is a connection between the two outbreaks. This year Ebola outbreaks have been declared in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Guinea, but it is the first time an outbreak has occurred in a large capital city such as Abidjan since the 2014–2016 West Ebola outbreak.
2021-08-142021-08-20 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.afro.who.int/news/cote-divoire-declares-first-ebola-outbreak-more-25-years
  
Article
The family of five-year-old Michael Komape, who drowned in a pit latrine more than seven years ago, as still battling with the Department of Basic Education to ensure the eradication of unsafe and unhygienic toilets at Limpopo schools. On 20 January in 2014, five-year-old Michael Komape drowned after falling into a pit toilet at Mahlodumela Lower Primary school, in Chebeng village, outside Polokwane, in Limpopo. Yet, more than seven years after the tragedy, many learners at public schools in the province are still forced to use old, dilapidated and dangerous pit toilets. This, according to Michael’s older sister, Lydia Komape, is a clear indication that the Limpopo Department of Education and that national Department of Basic Education do not care about the safety of learners. Speaking to Health-e News, Komape said that since the incident that took Michael’s life, not enough has been done by either department to eradicate dangerous pit toilets at public schools, something that bothers the family.
2021-08-132021-08-20 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/08/12/eradication-of-pit-toilets-at-limpopo-schools-still-a-pipe-dream/
  
Article
The Mpumalanga Health MEC, Sasekani Manzini, has been forced to take action as several healthcare facilities in the province face chronic medication shortages. These patients have been unable to access their medication with some even turned away and often find themselves at the back of the queue as facilities across South Africa continue take strain during the COVID-19 third wave. Emanzini explained that the reason for the shortage was due to a change in service providers and the inability to transport drugs. As a result, may patients have not been able to access their treatment in time. With no system in place, Emanzini has given the new service provider an ultimatum to deliver all supplies within a week.
2021-08-052021-08-06 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/08/05/mpumalanga-health-mec-steps-in-as-chronic-meds-run-dry/
  
Article
The charges relate to department tenders and contracts signed off between January 2011 and December 2015. Motau joined as head of department in 2013. He resigned in 2021 and took up the post of registrar of the HPCSA towards the end of June. On Monday, 2 August, Motau and 10 others appeared in the Bloemfontein Magistrates’ Court on 304 counts ranging from contravention of the Public Finance Management Act, forgery and uttering, to fraud, corruption and money laundering. Motau himself is charged on 45 counts. Before he was ordered to appear in court, Motau spoke to Spotlight about his plans to reform the HPCSA. On Tuesday, after being charged, he responded to follow-up questions.
2021-08-042021-08-06 12:00 AMMaverick Citizenhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-08-04-blow-to-health-professions-council-as-new-registrar-david-motau-faces-serious-charges/
  
Article
The Children’s Institute (CI) at the University of Cape Town (UCT) has developed a series of advocacy briefs in collaboration with the Children’s Hospital Trust and the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, calling for government to put children at the heart of South Africa’s COVID 19 response and recovery plans. The briefs document the impact of the pandemic on children and children’s services, and identify opportunities to strengthen systems, improve outcomes and better support children in future waves and crises.
2021-08-042021-08-06 12:00 AMUCT Newshttps://www.news.uct.ac.za/article/-2021-08-04-its-time-to-put-children-first-from-response-to-recovery
  
Article
After damning findings on the conditions of some Eastern Cape Hospitals, the Deputy Public Protector recommended several changes the provincial health department had to implement within 60 days. The report was published on 30 June this year. Halfway through the 60 days, people still have mixed feelings about their hospital visits and the provincial health department has little to say about what they’ve done to implement the recommended changes. Nophumzile Daza who receives chemotherapy at Livingstone Hospital and gets arthritis treatment at Dora Nginza Hospital blames staff shortages as the root cause for poor service delivery in both hospitals.
2021-08-032021-08-06 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/08/03/what-they-say-community-perspectives-on-health-services-in-the-eastern-cape/
  
Article
At the start of this year, governments, donors, civil society and the private sector united to launch the Nutrition for Growth Year of Action. The Year of Action is a historic opportunity to transform the way the world tackles the global commitment to eliminate child malnutrition. Breastfeeding is central to realising this commitment. Initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of birth, followed by exclusive breastfeeding for six months and continued breastfeeding for up to two years or beyond offer a powerful line of defence against all forms of child malnutrition, including wasting and obesity. Breastfeeding also acts as babies’ first vaccine, protecting them against many common childhood illnesses. While there has been progress in breastfeeding rates in the last four decades – with a 50 per cent increase in the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding globally – the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the fragility of those gains. In many countries, the pandemic has caused significant disruptions in breastfeeding support services, while increasing the risk of food insecurity and malnutrition. Several countries have reported that producers of baby foods have compounded these risks by invoking unfounded fears that breastfeeding can transmit COVID-19 and marketing their products as a safer alternative to breastfeeding. This year’s World Breastfeeding Week, under its theme ‘Protect Breastfeeding: A Shared Responsibility’ is a time to revisit the commitments made at the start of this year by prioritizing breastfeeding-friendly environments for mothers and babies.
2021-08-022021-08-06 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/31-07-2021-joint-statement-by-unicef-executive-director-henrietta-fore-and-who-director-general-dr.-tedros-adhanom-ghebreyesus-on-the-occasion-of-world-breastfeeding-week
  
Article
FIFA has launched #ReachOut, a campaign designed to raise awareness of the symptoms of mental health conditions, encourage people to seek help when they need it, and take actions every day for better mental health. With the support of past and current football players, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), FIFA is underlining the importance of greater awareness around mental health. In launching #ReachOut, FIFA President Gianni Infantino, said: “This campaign is very important in raising awareness about mental health conditions and encouraging a conversation which could save a life. In FIFA’s Vision 2020-2023, we pledge our commitment to make football work for society, and I thank the players and Ms Enke, who have contributed to this important initiative. “Depression and anxiety affect rising numbers of people worldwide, and young people are among the most vulnerable. Having a conversation with family, friends or a healthcare professional can be key. FIFA is proud to launch this campaign, supported by the World Health Organization and ASEAN to encourage people to #ReachOut.”
2021-08-022021-08-06 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/02-08-2021-fifa-launches-reachout-campaign-for-better-mental-health
  
Article
A study with men in Lusaka, Zambia suggests that ‘men-only’ antenatal talks which include information on HIV and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) could help male partners be better informed on these issues. Between January and May 2019, researchers interviewed 18 partners of pregnant women with HIV; 11 of the men had HIV and 7 did not. The age of participants ranged from 29 to 61 (average age 40). Participants reported being the main decision-makers on sexual and reproductive health (SRH). But most men said they did not have enough information about SRH, particularly in the context of HIV. While all men saw the importance of going with their partners to antenatal care appointments, and the need to be aware of PMTCT, certain things stopped some men from going. These barriers included clinic times clashing with working hours, and the fear of being forced to take an HIV test during an appointment. Many of the men who had gone to an antenatal care appointment felt that most of the information provided during the visit had been aimed at their partner rather than them.
2021-07-302021-08-06 12:00 AMAvert https://www.avert.org/news/men-only-spaces-could-improve-prevention-mother-child-transmission
  
Article
Zimbabwe’s efforts at reducing the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) have begun to pay off following the declaration by the World Health Organisation (WHO) that the country had transitioned out of the top 30 high TB burden countries in the world. The global health body last week released updated lists of high burden countries for TB, HIV-associated TB and multidrug/rifampicin-resistant TB (MDR/RR-TB) for 2021-2025. According to Global Tuberculosis Report 2020, between 2015 and 2019, incidence per 100 000 population per year declined by an estimated 18 percent in Zimbabwe. “WHO has officially communicated with the ministers of health of Cambodia, the Russian Federation and Zimbabwe, to inform them about their country’s transition out of the list of 30 high TB burden countries and to recognize their success in reducing the burden of TB disease in recent years.
2021-07-292021-07-05 12:00 AMThe Herald Zimbabwehttps://www.herald.co.zw/zim-makes-progress-on-tb/
  
Article
Forty years after the first cases of HIV-related illnesses and deaths, knowledge and understanding of HIV among the public is often patchy and confused and significant levels of stigma and discrimination remain. These are the findings of new research published today from the UK’s HIV rights charity National AIDS Trust and Fast-Track Cities London, the capital’s initiative to end HIV transmissions by 2030. Research agency BritainThinks surveyed 3,000 people and conduced six focus groups in the UK to find out people’s knowledge of and attitudes about HIV. Disappointingly, the report demonstrates how HIV remains a highly stigmatised and often misunderstood health condition. Many respondents were confused about how HIV is transmitted, the developments in treatment, and what this means for HIV in 2021.
2021-07-292021-07-30 12:00 AMNational AIDS Trust https://www.nat.org.uk/press-release/new-polling-shows-hiv-stigma-still-widespread
  
Article
To have been diagnosed with cancer is devastating, but most cancers at Stage I or Stage II are treatable and curable if diagnosed early. Cancer is not one disease — there are more than 300 cancers, with each having its own treatment regimen. There is no one size that fits all. Cancer can be treated with surgery, systemic therapy or chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and radiation therapy, or a combination of one or more of the modalities. It requires specialised, highly trained healthcare professionals, medicines and equipment, and is one of the most expensive non-communicable diseases to treat. Unfortunately, most patients diagnosed in the public healthcare system in South Africa have Stage III and Stage IV cancer, which is far more challenging to treat, and most often treatment is not curative but palliative. The 10 public sector radiation oncology units and three medical oncology units scattered across the country provide cancer patients with excellent treatment. Only 20% of cancer specialists in South Africa service 85% of uninsured patients treated in the public sector — an inequity that has been highlighted for many years. Cancer specialists work tirelessly and against all odds to provide the best service available, as well as serving as training facilities for the next generation of medical and radiation oncologists. Cancer patients seeking care at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital face many challenges. By the time they have been referred for treatment their cancer is often at an advanced stage. For some prostate cancer patients, the radiation oncology waiting list is longer than three years. Before the fire at the hospital and Covid-19, this unit had outdated equipment and lacked qualified radiation oncologists to provide treatment.
2021-07-282021-07-05 12:00 AMMaverick Citizenhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-06-28-stark-realities-face-cancer-patients-at-charlotte-maxeke-hospital-despite-glimmer-of-hope-reopening-brings/
  
Article
South Africa is on the brink of allowing pharmacists holding the required permits to prescribe and initiate HIV medicines without people first having to get scripts from doctors or nurses. The initiative, known as Pharmacist-Initiated Management of ART or PIMART, seeks to improve linkage to HIV treatment and prevention therapy among under-reached and underserved groups and communities. South Africa’s PIMART programme will be the first of its kind globally - potentially paving the way for other countries to follow suit.
2021-07-282021-07-30 12:00 AMHealth24 https://www.news24.com/health24/medical/hiv-aids/in-depth-sa-pharmacists-will-soon-be-able-to-prescribe-hiv-treatment-20210727
  
Article
A local Non-Profit Organisation (NPO) which offers free mental health services to the queer community is struggling to keep its doors open due to a lack of funds. Queerwell, based in Alberton, Johannesburg, provides a safe space for queer individuals who cannot afford private mental health services. The organisation has assisted more than 1 300 members of the LGBTQIA+ community in accessing private professional psychologists and therapists since 2019. It has also relied on volunteers and donors to remain operational. Dr Dulcy Rakumakoe, one of the founders of Queerwell, is desperate for help. “We are trying to raise the funding so that we can be able to pay the therapists and counselors, as well as the administrators. We are also aiming to provide employment for some members of the queer community,” she said. 
2021-07-282021-07-30 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2021/07/28/mental-health-of-queer-community-at-risk-as-npo-faces-closure/
  
Article
When we issued our first invitation to the Health Systems Trust, we felt truly honored to have the chance to interview Dr. Themba Moeti, the Chief Executive Officer of this important South African non-profit organization that acts as a health sector policy influencer and service delivery provider. Apart from his executive role with HST, Dr. Moeti also serves as a member of the National HIV Think Tank, the Maternal Neonatal, Children and Women’s Health Think Tank, co-ordinated by the National Department of Health of South Africa, and formerly served as a member of the Advisory Board for the University of the Witwatersrand Centre for Rural Health.
2021-07-282021-07-30 12:00 AMDevelopmentAidhttps://www.developmentaid.org/#!/news-stream/post/101758
1 - 100Next