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Today, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO, launched a new report calling on global leaders to take urgent action on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), responsible for 17 million premature deaths every year. To accelerate action Dr Tedros renewed the two-year appointment of Michael R. Bloomberg as WHO Global Ambassador for Noncommunicable Diseases and Injuries. This is Bloomberg’s third reappointment as Ambassador, having first been appointed to the role in 2016. The announcement came at the first annual gathering of a Heads of State and Government Group for the Prevention of NCDs, led by the President of Ghana and the Prime Minister of Norway [1],  held during the 77th Session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). This follows the launch of a Global NCD Compact earlier this year by Ghana and Norway.
2022-09-212022-09-23 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/21-09-2022-heads-of-state-commit-to-noncommunicable-disease-global-compact-to-save-50-million-lives-by-2030
  
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UNAIDS congratulates donors for increasing their contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund). Donors pledged US$ 14.25 billion to support efforts to end the three pandemics with more funding set to come. Donors made their pledges at the Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment Conference hosted by the President of the United States Joe Biden.  “Leaders from around the world who have committed resources today are life savers. They have made an investment in the future of children, young people and those facing the disproportionate burden of global inequalities—especially young women and girls. They are helping to build resilient health systems and be better prepared to face emerging threats to global security,” said Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS. 
2022-09-212022-09-23 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/september/20220921_PR_GF_replenishment_closing
  
Article
Fourteen months, seven facilities (in the Eastern Cape, Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal), two types of treatment (hundreds of pills), six months in hospital and two missed years of school. That’s what it took for Akona Tshwete*, 13, to recover from tuberculosis (TB), according to his doctor, Juli Switala. Switala is a paediatrician at the health organisation, The Aurum Institute, and was speaking at last week’s 7th South African TB Conference in Durban. The situation could have been avoided, says Switala — if Tshwete had access to a treatment programme geared towards his and other teens’ specific needs. TB treatment can be tough to take. For teens of up to 16 years of age, drug courses are between four and six months, depending on the severity of their TB, according to World Health Organisation guidelines issued in March.
2022-09-202022-09-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/health-news-south-africa/2022-09-20-the-future-of-sas-tb-plan-is-locked-up-in-the-mysterious-minds-of-teens/
  
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Sharply rising cases of some sexually transmitted diseases, including a 26% rise in new syphilis infections reported last year, are prompting US health officials to call for new prevention and treatment efforts. “It is imperative that we ... work to rebuild, innovate, and expand (STD) prevention in the US,” said Leandro Mena of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a speech on Monday at a medical conference on sexually transmitted diseases. Infections rates for some STDs, including gonorrhea and syphilis, have been rising for years. Last year the rate of syphilis cases reached its highest since 1991 and the total number of cases hit its highest since 1948. HIV cases are also on the rise, up 16% last year.
2022-09-202022-09-23 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/sep/19/sexually-transmitted-disease-rise-syphilis-us
  
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Positive poliovirus samples found in sewage in the UK and US have prompted fears of the return of this potentially fatal disease. A leading expert is calling for widespread polio antibody testing in affected areas, to assess the threat to individuals and communities. Concerns continue to grow that polio could make a reappearance in the UK. Following the detection of positive poliovirus samples in London sewage, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has advised targeted polio booster doses for all children aged between 1 and 9 in all London boroughs. It says this move will ensure a high level of protection against the virus and limit further spread. Some of the polio samples found in the UK have been genetically linked to a case reported in July 2022 in New York, where a State of Emergency was declared. The leading testing expert, Dr Quinton Fivelman PhD, Chief Scientific Officer at London Medical Laboratory, says: ‘The last case of polio in the UK was in 1984 and it’s obviously concerning that type 2 (PV2) polio samples have been detected in the UK’s waste water. Now the virus’ presence has been established in London’s sewage network, testing is being quickly expanded to other areas.
2022-09-202022-09-23 12:00 AMPharmiweb.comhttps://www.pharmiweb.com/press-release/2022-09-20/as-polio-threatens-a-return-uk-expert-calls-for-extensive-antibody-testing-to-protect-vulnerable-communities
  
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A vaccine candidate, called R21, has been shown to be up to 80% effective at preventing malaria in young children, according to the latest trial results. This follows from a study published in 2021 from the same team at Oxford University which showed that the three-dose vaccine was up to 77% effective at preventing malaria. Their latest study shows that a booster, given a year later, maintains the levels of protection at 70% to 80%, suggesting that long-term protection is possible. The Oxford researchers told the BBC that their vaccine can be made for “a few dollars”, and they have a deal to manufacture over 100 million doses a year. However, there is still a large hurdle to overcome. Phase 3 clinical trials – the final phase of testing in humans before regulatory approval can be sought – are yet to be conducted.
2022-09-202022-09-23 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/09/20/malaria-vaccine-the-road-has-been-long-and-tortuous-but-were-getting-there/
  
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Two young men are sitting on a couch scrolling on their phones when May Oo, a famous makeup artist and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) activist in Myanmar, joins them wearing a face mask and carrying a bag of drinks. He announces that a friend who works at an HIV clinic in Yangon told him that pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is now available in Myanmar. As one friend is unaware of PrEP, May Oo shares his knowledge, also informing anyone else wo would like to listen in. This scene, from a video shared on the Facebook pages of implementing partners of the USAID HIV/AIDS Flagship (UHF) Project, is one of several to raise awareness and demand PrEP as a prevention tool for men who have sex with men and transgender women in Myanmar. In these videos by celebrated members of the LGBTQ community and other educational posts, questions covered include what PrEP is, why it should be taken, and where to get it. As May Oo’s friend in the video puts it, ‘PrEP is a drug that can prevent HIV.’
2022-09-192022-09-23 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/september/20220919_prep_Myanmar
  
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At the Transforming Education Summit in New York it was announced that 12 African countries* have committed to Education Plus, a bold initiative to prevent HIV infections through free universal, quality secondary education for all girls and boys in Africa, reinforced through comprehensive empowerment programmes. Speaking on the Leaders Day of the Summit on behalf of the Education Plus movement, the Executive Director of UNAIDS, Winnie Byanyima said, “School saves lives. We are coming together to champion the right for a girl to be in a classroom and in a safe classroom. Keeping girls in school helps ensure their rights and prevents HIV. We know that if a girl completes secondary education, the risk of infection reduces by 50%. That's why we've teamed up with UNESCO, UNFPA, UNICEF and UN Women, with governments and with civil society, to champion the education and empowerment of adolescent girls in Africa to stop new HIV infections.” Through Education Plus, champion countries across Africa are bringing sectors together to fight inequalities by ensuring access to and completion of secondary school, protecting girls and young women from HIV infection, sexual violence, teenage pregnancies and early marriages, and creating opportunities for access to education, health, and jobs.
2022-09-192022-09-23 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/september/20220919_PR_TES_Eduplus
  
Article
The racial disparities in the current monkeypox outbreak recall the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Unless health leaders heed the lessons of the past and act compassionately to reach vulnerable populations, these disparities could worsen. While anyone can get monkeypox, Black and Latino men who have sex with men make up more than two-thirds of cases nationwide. However, of the 352,000 vaccines administered so far, a largely disproportionate share has gone to white men. This discrepancy is tied to fear, stigma and lack of access to cultural health resources among men of color. These groups are traditionally more closeted than their white counterparts, more likely to be transient or homeless, and often speak English as a second language. In other words, it's difficult to get treatment to the men who need it most.
2022-09-192022-09-23 12:00 AMwbur https://www.wbur.org/cognoscenti/2022/09/19/monkeypox-hiv-vaccines-epidemic-josiane-martinez
  
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With the support of the World Health Organization (WHO)’s Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, 21 countries in the Region now have domestic genome sequencing capacity – a critical tool for understanding severe acute respiratory coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its variants of concern – and other emerging pathogens’ evolution and circulation. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Regional Office has been providing constant support to countries by supplying advanced genomic sequencing machines, training the health workforce in bioinformatics and genomics, boosting financial resources, and ensuring the availability of reagents and other essential supplies. These efforts have borne fruit, as 11 of the Region’s countries have built their capacity to undertake routine genomic surveillance from scratch, in response to the public health impact of COVID-19 across the Region.
2022-09-192022-09-23 12:00 AMReliefweb https://reliefweb.int/report/world/who-emro-investment-genomic-surveillance-priority-region
  
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Launched in 2013, the ideal clinic programme has been one of the Department of Health’s cornerstone interventions aimed at improving the quality of care provided at public healthcare facilities in South Africa. The programme (its full name is the Ideal Clinic Realisation and Management programme – ICRM) sets out to ensure that clinics have good infrastructure, adequate staff, adequate medicine and supplies, and good administrative processes, among others. Now, four new studies together suggest that, while some progress has been made in recent years, the programme has had only a limited impact on the actual and perceived quality of care patients receive in Gauteng. In some cases, staff see ideal clinic certification as merely a box-ticking exercise. Three of the four studies were part of a larger rapid review study of the implementation of the ICRM programme in 45 clinics in Gauteng from 2015. The studies were presented last week at the 17th annual conference of the Public Health Association of South Africa (PHASA) held in Durban. The theme of the conference was ‘Building Back Better: Public Health Resilience and Recovery’
2022-09-192022-09-23 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/09/19/healthcare-problems-persist-at-ideal-clinics-studies-show/
  
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The work cracks open a whole new way of thinking about certain cancers and how to treat and even prevent them. It also suggests environmental agencies may have good reason to impose much stricter limits on air quality. Scientists typically describe carcinogens in terms of the havoc they wreak on our genome. UV exposure from sunbathing damages DNA in skin cells, and over time cells with mutations can accumulate and eventually grow with abandon. Smokers breathe in chemicals that can cause widespread mutations and alterations to DNA that can lead to lung cancer. Public health groups make sure that people know that damage is preventable — slather on the sunscreen or toss the pack of cigarettes — and drug companies have come up with medicines that target those mutations if they ignore that advice.
2022-09-192022-09-23 12:00 AMBloomberghttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bloomberg/opinion/2022-09-19-study-offers-new-view-on-air-pollution-and-cancer-link/
  
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UNAIDS is calling on countries and donors to fully fund the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria by pledging a total of at least US$ 18 billion at the Seventh Global Fund Replenishment Conference hosted by President Biden in New York this week. Speaking at the opening, on behalf of the United Nations family, the Executive Director of UNAIDS Winnie Byanyima said, “Millions of lives are at stake, along with the health of us all. A successful replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is essential to get the world on track to end three of today’s most devasting epidemics and instill resilience into national health systems capable of withstanding tomorrow’s shocks.” In its July report, In Danger, UNAIDS revealed that the AIDS response is under serious threat from COVID-19 and the economic crisis, compounded by a continued decline in resources. It showed that while HIV infections should be continuing to decline in all countries, one in five of the world’s countries house rising new HIV infections. The rate of new infections globally only fell by 3.6% between 2020—2021, the smallest annual decrease since 2016. 
2022-09-182022-09-23 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/september/20220918_PR_GF_replenisment_opening
  
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Minister of Health Doctor Joe Phaahla says government is working on a new Tuberculosis (TB) and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) national strategic plan, in an effort to reach its goal of eradicating TB by 2030. Addressing delegates during the closing ceremony of the 7th SA TB Conference in Durban, Phaahla admitted that TB did take a back seat during the COVID-19 pandemic.Statistics show that during the COVID 19 pandemic in 2020 alone, the country recorded 328 000 new TB infections. It is said that of this, about 60 percent of patients also have HIV. Phaahla says the new strategic plan will help the country to regain its mission in the fight against TB infections. “It is a critical process, it’s a critical document we are developing. It is the last one, we are working towards our achievement of the agenda 2030 that is to eliminate TB as our public health threat.  So the NSP that we are working on will be launched at the World TB 2023 [Conference], will be the plan that will take us to 2030,” says the minister.
2022-09-162022-09-23 12:00 AMSABC Newshttps://www.sabcnews.com/sabcnews/new-strategic-plan-will-help-regain-mission-in-the-fight-against-tb-minister-phaahla
  
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The global community commemorates World Patient Safety Day on Saturday, 17 September 2022. To raise awareness, the World Health Organization reminds us that: "Every person around the world will, at some point in their life, take medications to prevent or treat illness. However, medications sometimes cause serious harm if incorrectly stored, prescribed, dispensed, administered or if monitored insufficiently… It is in this context that 'Medication Safety' has been selected as the theme for World Patient Safety Day 2022, with the slogan 'Medication Without Harm'." HST's Communications Unit had a brief chat with one of the organisation's Advanced Clinical Care Clinicians, Dr Ganizani Mlawanda – a Family Physician, Clinical Epidemiologist and Advanced HIV Clinician with over 18 years HIV/AIDS/STIs/TB programme design, implementation and management experience at all levels. He is passionate about HAST (HIV, AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and TB) and NCDs' (non-communicable diseases) medical education.
2022-09-162022-09-23 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=136
  
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In November last year we were here for the International Aids Conference in Africa (ICASA), but we had to make drastic adjustments due to the break-out of the 4th wave of Omicron. One of the most devastating impacts of the pandemic was the disruptions it created in HIV and TB response. The 7th SA TB Conference is indeed a sign that we are on the road to recovery. It has provided us an opportunity to showcase South Africa’s resilience through the COVID- 19 pandemic, as well as the milestones we have achieved in our quest to eliminate TB as a public health threat. We go away with renewed vigour to accelerate the country’s efforts against TB.I n March 2021, the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) took a decision to extend the current National Strategic Plan for HIV, TB and STIs for the period 2017 to 2022 by an additional year to implement NSP Catch-Up Plans designed to mitigate against the impact of COVID-19.The main aim of the Catch-Up Plans was to accelerate programme implementation and explore other interventions to fast-track progress against the targets set in the NSP. The TB catch up plans culminated in the TB Recovery Plan. I am sure that during the course of this conference you were able to reflect on the TB Recovery Plan.
2022-09-162022-09-23 12:00 AMCovid-19 Online Resource and News Portal https://sacoronavirus.co.za/2022/09/16/speaking-notes-dr-joe-phaahla-7th-sa-tb-conference-working-together-to-get-tb-control-back-on-track/
  
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Good sexual and reproductive health is key to a woman's general health and well-being, yet women often shy away from these discussions. One intimate health expert urges women to talk openly about their sexual health. Dr Shirin Lakhani, a UK-based GP and owner of Elite Aesthetics, told Cover Media that women should feel free to bring up topics they are concerned about, whether it’s with their doctor or a loved one. “Women’s health continues to be downplayed, especially around sexual health, and women often go incorrectly treated,” she says, adding: “Sexual health-related issues are wide-ranging and encompass everything from sexual dysfunction, sexual expression, and also pleasure.”
2022-09-162022-09-23 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/life/wellness/body/vaginismus-endometriosis-womens-health-continues-to-be-downplayed-says-doctor-20220916
  
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With at least 13% of women in developing countries bearing children while they are still kids themselves, four global health giants have joined forces to end this scourge of teenage pregnancies. To counter this, the 2gether4SRHR programme, which combines the efforts of UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF and the World Health Organisation (WHO), hosted a dialogue earlier this week. The discussion titled ‘Building back better’ discussed high-impact practices to prevent pregnancies among teenagers in the Southern African Development Community region (SADC). Together, they aim to improve the sexual and reproductive health and the rights of all people, especially adolescent girls and young people.
2022-09-162022-09-23 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/09/16/teaming-up-to-end-teenage-pregnancies-in-sadc/
  
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The lives of elderly people living with mental illnesses like Alzheimer’s and dementia have become hell as stigma and discrimination refuse to die down. It’s so bad that an old woman living with dementia in the Free State was called a witch. Thomas Selogilwe, who resides in Thaba Nchu, is concerned for the welfare of his 81-year-old neighbour, Magaret Molema. He was roped in by social workers to help Molema when she started losing her sanity. “Gogo was found not too far from her place, and because no one knew about her problem, they called her a witch. I also realised that some had beaten her. Our people need to know that when you reach a certain age, your mind is not working as it used. Knowing about diseases like Alzheimer’s and Dementia will prevent people from calling others names,” said Selogile.
2022-09-152022-09-20 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/09/15/alzheimers-lets-protect-our-elderly-fs-locals/
  
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South Africa’s tuberculosis testing numbers have recovered from dramatic Covid-19-related declines in 2020, delegates heard this week at the opening of the 7th South African TB Conference held in Durban.
2022-09-152022-09-20 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-09-15-government-outlines-nations-tb-recovery-plan-as-testing-volumes-show-improvement/
  
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Trauma cases continue to be a pressing issue for healthcare facilities in the Western Cape. This is now causing significant delays in scheduled surgeries, extended waiting periods and a financial burden on the healthcare system. During a summit last week, professors from Stellenbosch University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS) discussed the province’s inability to satisfy basic healthcare. Areas affected by preventable trauma cases include care for chronic diseases and maternal and child health. The meeting included key stakeholders in trauma care, public health, community safety, and provincial healthcare leaders. The summit acknowledged that alcohol plays a role in many trauma cases.
2022-09-142022-09-20 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/09/14/trauma-cases-are-burdening-the-western-capes-healthcare-system/
  
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Minister of Health Joe Phaahla says that a recent High Court ruling declaring parts of the National Health Act unconstitutional won’t stop the government’s plans to roll out the National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme. In June 2022, the High Court found that sections 36 to 40 of the NHA were unconstitutional. The sections refer to the Act’s provisions for issuing health establishments with a “certificate of need”. According to the controversial laws, doctors and health practitioners cannot start a practice or provide health services without a certificate. Health professionals have long argued that the provision violates fundamental rights, as it gives the state power to stop them from working.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMBusinessTechhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/government/625069/court-ruling-wont-stop-nhi-plans-for-south-africa-minister/
  
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Health professionals are often targeted by formula milk companies, given their strong influence on mothers and infant feeding attitudes and practices. To counter their often aggressive marketing campaigns, a local expert believes health science students can act as agents of change. Dr Haroon Salojee, Professor of Community Pediatrics at the University of Witwatersrand (Wits), said there is an urgent need to strengthen lactation education and training. This will not only help arm mothers with the necessary knowledge but also healthcare professionals, who are the most trusted sources of education on infant feeding and nutrition.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2022/09/13/formula-milk-using-health-students-as-change-agents/
  
Article
When 58-year-old Karen Howley LaCamera went to the emergency room with acute pain in her abdomen in January 2018, she thought she was having another gall bladder attack. The doctors in the ER ordered a CT scan and told her she’d probably need surgery to remove her gall bladder if things didn’t improve. She was released later that night. But when she got home, the ER doctor called to tell her that the problem wasn’t her gallbladder, it was a tumor the size of an orange sitting on her ovary. Several tests, surgeries, and a biopsy later, LaCamera, who lives in Sudbury, Massachusetts, was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer. “I was just like wow,” she recalls. “When I look back, I think about the symptoms I disregarded.” LaCamera says she “always felt discomfort and excused it.” She had frequent urination and pain in her abdomen, pelvis, and back. She also had bloating, or as she called it, a tummy roll. “No matter what I did for exercise I couldn’t get rid of it,” she says. She thought she was just getting older.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMEveryday Healthhttps://www.everydayhealth.com/ovarian-cancer/why-the-latest-tests-and-treatments-offer-hope-for-ovarian-cancer/
  
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To end the HIV/AIDs epidemic, we first need to end the inequalities that prevent people from accessing healthcare. With support from the Global Fund, Cordaid runs a programme in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) that takes a Gender and Human Rights approach to ensure HIV services are accessible for all. Since the first case of AIDS globally in 1981, and the discovery of its cause, the HIV retrovirus, in 1983, great strides have been made to eradicate the epidemic. After four decades of relentless efforts against HIV, 94,000 people are still living with AIDS in the DRC. Today, the epidemic is said to be "concentrated". This means that despite the decline in the prevalence of HIV in the general population, there is a concentration of the epidemic in specific groups.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMReliefwebhttps://reliefweb.int/report/democratic-republic-congo/breaking-down-inequalities-tackle-hiv-epidemic
  
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Ten days before today’s opening of the seventh South African Tuberculosis (TB) Conference  — on the morning of Saturday, September 3 — the event was set to be the best-attended iteration of the gathering to date. More than 1 000 delegates had signed up and the interest from civil society was unparalleled.  Public health experts’ enthusiasm came at a crucial time: after the COVID-19 pandemic had undone years of progress with cutting TB deaths (which are preventable).  But by the end of that Saturday, high profile delegates’ interest in attending the meeting had plummeted.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/opinion/2022-09-13-the-oldest-trick-in-big-tobaccos-playbook-nearly-derailed-sas-tb-conference-heres-why/
  
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Whether a pharmacist suggests it for treating headaches or whether a doctor prescribes it for managing post-surgical pain, chances are good that at some point you’ve taken a pain pill containing the opioid codeine. Products like Gen-payne, Myprodol, and Stopayne all contain small amounts of codeine – typically in combination with other painkillers such as paracetamol or ibuprofen. In recent years, however, the regulation of codeine has become something of a headache. On the one hand, codeine is a powerful and effective painkiller that can bring relief to many. On the other, abuse or misuse of the drug can lead to dependence and addiction. Finding the right balance between an outright ban and a free-for-all is not straightforward.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/09/13/in-depth-codeine-regulation-a-tussle-between-pain-relief-and-addiction/
  
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• Young people are having sex, whether their parents like it or not. But increasing teenage pregnancy rates indicate teens don’t have the information they need to prevent unplanned pregnancies.
• Having open discussions about sex can help teens to understand the possible outcomes of experimenting with sex.
• Our reporters travelled to the North West for this video, where they spoke to a young mother, who fell pregnant when she was 13, but managed to return to school after her pregnancy.
2022-09-132022-09-20 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/multimedia/videos/2022-09-15-watch-books-babies-how-to-keep-young-mothers-in-school/
  
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In a recent study published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers investigated the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and other recent sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnoses among persons with monkeypox. The current outbreak of monkeypox, caused by the monkeypox virus belonging to the same family of viruses as the smallpox virus, has a high incidence rate among persons who are gay and bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). Previous outbreaks of the disease in Nigeria showed associations between HIV infections and poor clinical outcomes during concurrent monkeypox infections. This highlights the need to understand the association of HIV and other STIs with the clinical outcomes of monkeypox so that public health decisions regarding vaccination and treatment can prioritize the high-risk groups.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Sciencehttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20220912/CDC-report-shows-people-with-monkeypox-have-higher-than-expected-rates-of-HIV-and-STIs.aspx
  
Article
When it comes to tuberculosis (TB), men and boys bear the highest disease burden, accounting for 64% of all TB cases in 2020. But this single statistic does not capture the full impact of the disease. TB, which is caused by bacteria that most often affect the lungs, is the second leading infectious killer after COVID-19. In 2020, an estimated 10 million people fell ill with TB worldwide, and 1.5 million people died from the disease. While men are nearly twice as likely to become infected with TB compared to women, women are more likely to face life-altering stigma for being TB-positive. “Women need differentiated support,” Amrita Daftary, a social and behavioral global health researcher at York University in Toronto, told Global Citizen. “We’re at a stage where we know what the challenges are when it comes to women, stigma, and TB. We now have to move to action.”
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMGlobal Citizenhttps://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/tuberculosis-stigma-women/
  
Article
Artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning is a rising tool to assist clinicians in disease detection and diagnosis. A new study by researchers at Google Health have demonstrated how AI deep learning can spot pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs as well as human radiologists. The human brain and neuroscience have inspired concepts and methods used in artificial intelligence. The architecture of artificial intelligence deep learning is somewhat inspired by the human brain and biological cognition. The "deep" in deep learning refers to the many processing layers consisting of many nodes that are analogous to artificial neurons. As information passes through the layers, the weights of nodes are adjusted.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMPsychology Todayhttps://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-future-brain/202209/ai-detects-tuberculosis-x-rays
  
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EThekwini mayor Mxolisi Kaunda called for more co-operation in the fight against HIV/Aids and appealed for ideas put forward to combat the scourge to be put into action. Kaunda was addressing the eThekwini District Aids Council. He called for communities, civil society organisations, government and the private sector to work together to reverse the scourge of HIV/Aids.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/mercury/news/time-to-put-ideas-into-action-in-the-fight-against-hivaids-says-durban-mayor-6f77e3ff-36b3-4ddf-84fd-4a5bc94b5b8f
  
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The number of pepople on tuberculosis treatment rebounded to 5.3 million in 2021 and is nearing pre-pandemic levels of 5.5 million, according to a new Global Fund report.  That’s an encouraging sign of progress after treatment plummeted to just 4.5 million people in 2020, the report, released on Monday, notes. Overall, the new report shows the fight against HIV/AIDS and malaria, as well as tuberculosis, is rebuilding momentum since the pandemic-fueled sharp declines in diagnosis and treatment levels for the world’s three biggest infectious diseases.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/tb-hiv-malaria-rebounds-pre-pandemic-level/
  
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Nigeria has a maternal mortality problem. Scratch that. Nigeria has a maternal mortality crisis. One of the epic proportions. Every 11 minutes, a woman loses her life due to childbirth-related complications. Put more graphically, every day a plane full of women crashes them to their deaths. The pilot? Maternal mortality. Some days ago, a lady reached out to me to tell me about the death of her friend Mama J. Mama J had gone in for childbirth with severe shortage of blood, medically called “Anaemia”. Her PCV was 16%. She was reportedly transfused and operated on. She developed a stroke afterwards and died.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMVanguardhttps://www.vanguardngr.com/2022/09/nigeria-has-a-maternal-health-problem/
  
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Offering a cautionary tale to pregnant individuals who think smoking a joint is no big deal, new research links prenatal cannabis exposure to social, emotional and behavioral problems in offspring that may persist into early adolescence: ages 11 to 12. Researchers analyzed roughly a dozen measures, ranging from rule-breaking to aggression, a "sluggish cognitive tempo" and "psychotic-like experiences." In a research letter published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics, the investigators said the affected children also may face a greater risk of "psychiatric disorders and problematic substance use" as they enter the peak period of vulnerability in later adolescence.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMUPIhttps://www.upi.com/Health_News/2022/09/12/cannabis-use-pregnancy-offspring-behavioral-problems-study/5761662994431/
  
Article
The World Health Organization has activated its emergency response strategy in Zimbabwe to deal with the latest measles outbreak in the Southern African nation. Staffing will be increased as part of the strategy, which has already included vaccinating at least 700,000 children. Despite this campaign, health experts remain concerned about the rapid spread of the virus. At least 6,444 cases have been recorded since April, when the first infections were reported in Zimbabwe’s eastern province of Manicaland, with more than 700 deaths so far.
2022-09-122022-09-20 12:00 AMNew Zimbabwehttps://www.newzimbabwe.com/who-concerns-trigger-crisis-response-to-zimbabwes-measles-outbreak/
  
Article
Dr Michel Gasana, TB Medical Officer, World Health Organization (WHO) – Regional Office for Africa, spoke with Open Access Government to provide an update on the global picture of Tuberculosis (TB). While TB mainly affects adults in their most productive years, we also find out how it impacts children. We learn why TB is particularly difficult to diagnose in children and about the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, generally available to assist with the diagnosis of paediatric TB. Further into this in-depth interview, Dr Gasana walks us through how TB is treated and how WHO Africa responds to this bacterial infection. Finally, we discover how COVID-19 has affected the TB response in the continent.
2022-09-082022-09-19 12:00 AMOpen Access Governmenthttps://www.openaccessgovernment.org/the-global-picture-of-tuberculosis/143111/
  
Article
At SECTION27, we often engage with pregnant women and young children being denied access to healthcare services at hospitals in Gauteng. This is despite that providing free health services to vulnerable categories of persons, like pregnant women and young children, is one of the key tenets of equitable access to healthcare services. In fact, it is a core determinant of priority health outcomes, such as reducing maternal and child disease and death. Pregnant women and young children have special health needs.
2022-09-082022-09-19 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/09/09/opinion-mothers-and-babies-pay-the-price-for-medical-xenophobia/
  
Article
Meet the Health Systems Trust's (HST) Zululand District Co-ordinator, Makhosazana (Makhosi) Khoza – a fervent and compassionate game-changer for health service delivery in partnership with her local Department of Health (DoH) within the province of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). She is employed under HST's South Africa Sustainable Response to HIV/AIDS (SA SURE PRO) Project, which is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Makhosi co-ordinated a successful three-day Integrated Action Review (IAR) in August, attended by a full house of HST and DoH colleagues from Zululand: District Management Team members, District and Sub-district Programme Co-ordinators, Data Management Team members, and Area Co-ordinators. Facilitated by a joint HST and DoH team, with specialist facilitation on Wellness for Effective Leadership (WEL) by Sarah Davids, the group convened away from their place of work and home district in order to give full focus to the purpose of the event ‒ finding effective solutions for improving programme performance.
2022-09-072022-09-09 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=134
  
Article
The 11th Assembly of the World Council of Churches (WCC) is meeting in Karlsruhe, Germany, from August 31 to September 8, 2022. The WCC brings together delegates and participants from 345 denominations from around the world, representing more than 500 million Christians. Faith leaders and activists living with HIV expressed huge concerns for the future of the HIV response. Young people continue to be exposed to HIV; women are experiencing violence in all forms. Governments are moving away from HIV and many ecumenical organizations too. What we need is a continued engagement with people with HIV and those at risk.
2022-09-072022-09-09 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/september/20220907_people-living-with-hiv-world-council-churches-assembly
  
Article
HIV-1 is one of the fastest-mutating viruses ever studied. Over a dozen distinct subtypes exist, with countless specific versions of the virus varying from person to person. The extraordinary diversity of HIV-1 and rapid mutation rate makes vaccine development a challenge that researchers have failed to overcome for over three decades. However, a new vaccination strategy for HIV-1 induced a diverse arsenal of protective antibodies in monkeys.
The fastest-mutating virus
Most vaccines offer protection by inducing antibodies that recognize and bind to a functional region of the pathogen. For example, COVID vaccines result in antibodies that attach to the virus’ spike protein, which the virus uses to hook to the membrane of host cells. These antibodies effectively neutralize the virus, preventing it from attaching (and subsequently entering and infecting). But what happens when that spike protein changes? Those neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) are less protective and cannot bind as efficiently. In the case of COVIID, researchers are working to develop vaccines that induce antibodies to regions of the spike protein that rarely mutate. HIV-1 also has spike proteins that it uses to attach to host cells, but scientists are taking a different approach. HIV-1’s diversity requires a vaccine capable of inducing not just nAbs in general but a broad arsenal of nAbs that can neutralize the multiple circulating strains. These broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) emerge in approximately 20-30% of HIV-1-infected people. Thus, the human immune system can produce bnAbs against HIV-1 under the right conditions. But those conditions are tricky.
2022-09-072022-09-09 12:00 AMBig Thinkhttps://bigthink.com/health/finally-hiv-vaccine/
  
Article
At the 23rd World Congress of the International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI) WHO released a new module of its implementation tool for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to support countries implementing, and scaling up integrated STI services for people who use PrEP. The module provides a framework and practical guidance for decision-makers, programme and facility managers, and health care workers for the gradual integration of sexually transmitted infection (STIs) services considering the local context and modes of PrEP delivery services.
2022-09-062022-09-09 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/06-09-2022-new-module-prep-implementation-tool-on-integration-of-sti-services
  
Article
“Call me Tumi,” says Boitumelo Semete-Makokotlela. This after an awkward “do we shake hands nowadays or not?” in the doorway of her Centurion home. Unexpected winter rain had clogged up the roads and drawn out the school run, putting Tumi, casually-dressed in a grey workout tracksuit, slightly behind schedule. “I drop the two of them off at school myself every morning because it’s important to me that we use that time to connect,” she says and adjusts her stylish spectacles.
2022-09-062022-09-09 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/features/2022-09-06-how-saphras-young-ceo-weathered-the-covid-storm/
  
Article
A KwaZulu-Natal healer is one of the thousands playing a vital role in spotting the early signs of childhood cancer. Catherine Ntanjana is one of 5,000 traditional health practitioners (THP) who the Childhood Cancer Foundation of SA (CHOC) trained  to recognise warning signs. Since her training in 2018, Ntanjana advised three families to take their children for testing. “I noticed their children had some symptoms we trained to spot. But what saddened me is that all of them just brushed me off instead of going to the local clinic,” Ntanjana said.
2022-09-062022-09-09 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/09/06/childhood-cancer-traditional-healers-have-vital-role/
  
Article
Tuberculosis, historically one of the most significant global public health concerns, remains an infection of concern, especially during pregnancy. The WHO reports that 3.3 million women were infected with TB in 2020. Responsible for over half a million deaths each year, TB is thought to be a major factor contributing to concerning rates of perinatal and maternal morbidity in Africa. People living with conditions that impair the immune system – like HIV – are at a higher risk of developing an active case of TB. One study found that HIV-infected women may be twice as likely to contract TB (1–11% prevalence, compared to 0.06–0.53%). The immunological changes associated with pregnancy could render mothers-to-be more vulnerable to either new or latent persisting TB infections.
2022-09-062022-09-09 12:00 AMiAfricahttps://iafrica.com/tuberculosis-hiv-in-pregnancy-a-concerning-state-of-affairs/
  
Article
Two-fifths of people with tuberculosis are unaware that they are infected because their diagnosis relies on outdated tests – something Unitaid and partners aim to change with a $30 million investment in new diagnostic technologies to enable same-day results. Announcing the investment on Tuesday, the global health agency explained that the current diagnosis in low and middle-income countries relies on sputum tests that have low sensitivity, especially in the presence of HIV coinfection, require patients to make multiple visits to health centres and are “largely ineffective in diagnosing children or people in advanced stages of disease who have difficulty producing sputum”.
2022-09-062022-09-09 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/unitaid-to-invests-in-new-tb-tests-as-south-africa-study-reports-importance-of-better-screening/
  
Article
HIV-positive pregnant patients require antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent pregnancy complications. The data on the effectiveness and safety of dolutegravir-based therapies have not been sufficient in the current literature. Participants who received dolutegravir had a higher percentage of pregnancies in which viral suppression was present compared to other types of ART. Of pregnancies where ART was started during pregnancy, dolutegravir had greater rates of viral suppression at delivery than those on other ART. The adverse outcomes of being born premature, having low birth weight, and being small for gestational age were not significantly different between groups on dolutegravir versus other forms of ART. No neonatal deaths occurred in any of the groups. Four instances of perinatal HIV transmission occurred, none of which were in participants taking dolutegravir.
2022-09-052022-09-09 12:00 AM2 Minute Medicinehttps://www.2minutemedicine.com/dolutegravir-associated-with-improved-viral-suppression-in-hiv-positive-pregnant-patients/
  
Article
The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the End TB Strategy to ultimately eliminate tuberculosis (TB) from the world. The strategy was endorsed in 2014 by the Sixty-seventh World Health Assembly and aims to “end the global TB epidemic” by 2035. The strategy initially aims to reduce the number of people suffering from TB by 90% by this deadline while reducing deaths from the disease by 95% and protecting families from the negative impact of the disease. Here, we discuss the strategy in detail as well as outline what TB is and why it is important to focus on eliminating it.
2022-09-052022-09-09 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Sciencehttps://www.news-medical.net/health/What-is-the-END-TB-strategy.aspx
  
Article
The GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences will lead an education initiative for primary care practitioners to improve communication about HIV and COVID-19 for vulnerable patients. SMHS received funding from biotechnology company Gilead Sciences to train primary care practitioners over the next 18 months to engage in “culturally responsive” conversations about HIV and COVID screening and testing with patients who identify as LGBTQ+ and Black, Indigenous People of Color. The Two In One HIV + COVID Screening & Testing Model aims to create better relationships between patients and health care officials to lessen the negative stigma surrounding HIV and COVID screening. The model hopes to eliminate “discomfort” from patients when talking about the risks and barriers to care patients face when dealing with HIV and COVID.
2022-09-052022-09-09 12:00 AMThe GW Hatchethttps://www.gwhatchet.com/2022/09/05/smhs-to-lead-initiative-to-remove-barriers-to-hiv-and-covid-screening/
  
Article
A distressed mother from the North West was left with more questions than answers after her nine-year-old son was diagnosed with bilharzia. It all started when Mokgadi Sebone* noticed blood stains on her son’s underpants. She immediately sat down with him before discovering that he’d been passing blood in his urine for some time. Worried sick, she took him to the nearest clinic where he was diagnosed with the tropical disease. “When I saw the blood, I thought it was prostate cancer or kidney failure. But bilharzia? I’d never heard of such a disease. I didn’t know how to feel or what to think. Was my baby going to die and where did he get it? I had so many questions,” said Mokgadi.
2022-09-032022-09-09 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2022/09/03/bilharzia-a-silent-disease-lurking-in-our-waters/
  
Article
Kenya is set to implement a three-test HIV testing algorithm as it seeks to optimize ongoing efforts to deal with the virus. Speaking after he received a preliminary report of a technical taskforce on the adoption of the procedure, health Cabinet secretary Mutahi Kagwe said the field testing will be piloted in selected counties ahead of the national roll out. “I congratulate and thank members of the Taskforce for exhibiting professionalism and adhering to WHO recommendations while undertaking the assignment,” said the health CS.
2022-09-032022-09-09 12:00 AMAfrican Businesshttps://african.business/2022/09/apo-newsfeed/kenya-adopts-three-test-hiv-testing-in-latest-efforts-to-deal-with-the-virus/
  
Article
The challenges South Africa’s healthcare system faces cannot be blamed on migrants seeking treatment at the country’s facilities, said Health Minister Dr Joe Phaahla. Speaking outside Kalafong Hospital in Atteridgeville, Pretoria, Phaahla admitted poor management, maladministration, staff shortages, and corruption weaken the public health sector. Phaahla visited the hospital after a picket by Operation Dudula outside Kalafong Hospital started to grow and gained more media attention. The organisation spent all of August outside the hospital to stop foreigners from accessing care.
2022-09-022022-09-09 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2022/09/02/phaala-dont-blame-migrants-for-healthcare-challenges/
  
Article
Community-led monitoring is an emerging model in which communities take the lead on the routine monitoring of a specific issue that matters to them, in any place where they are the end user. At the 24th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2022) in Montreal last month, Solange Baptiste of the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC) presented a look into community-led monitoring.
2022-09-022022-09-09 12:00 AMAidsmaphttps://www.aidsmap.com/news/sep-2022/community-led-monitoring-hiv-services-leads-investment-and-policy-change
  
Article
Researchers have significantly strengthened the safety profile of a watershed treatment course for highly drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis — a heartening breakthrough set to change the lives of millions of MDR-TB patients around the world. The results of a randomized-controlled trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine today showed the new oral TB antibiotic regimen BPaL had half as many side effects but maintained an efficacy rate of 91% after an adjustment to the course of one of the three component antibiotics in the regimen. The breakthrough findings have already been hailed by experts as one of the most important developments in tuberculosis research this century.
2022-09-012022-09-09 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watch https://healthpolicy-watch.news/a-breakthrough-tuberculosis-treatment-just-got-safer/
  
Article
“If your doll could talk, what would she say?” Since 1999, this is the question that the Stitches Doll Project has asked of women dealing with different health and life challenges. The project started as a way to help women deal with the challenges of living with HIV, but the project has grown to now offer its healing services to women who are dealing with a spectrum of heavy issues. The idea is to give a voice to any woman who feels silenced, for a variety of reasons. Often, participants feel as if they have been made voiceless by the very issues that their doll speaks to. Creating her own doll to visually represent what she wants to say to the world can be incredibly empowering, cathartic, healing, and redeeming.
2022-09-012022-09-09 12:00 AMThe Body HIV/AIDS Resourcehttps://www.thebody.com/article/the-stitches-doll-project
  
Article
In July, cancer research and treatment center City of Hope presented research at the 2022 International AIDS Conference that shed a positive spotlight on the continued push to better understand, treat, and combat HIV. The news reverberated around the world — the 66-year-old patient, who wishes to remain anonymous, is the oldest individual to achieve remission from both HIV and leukemia, following a successful stem cell transplant from a donor who possesses an extremely rare genetic mutation.
2022-09-012022-09-09 12:00 AMHealthlinehttps://www.healthline.com/health-news/how-a-4th-person-was-cured-of-hiv-after-stem-cell-treatments
  
Article
Dishonourable ministers and MECs, we know the health system is under great strain and we support and sympathise with the health workers who person the frontlines of care in very difficult circumstances. We don’t deny that clinics and hospitals are overcrowded and understaffed and that in some areas many of the people needing healthcare are migrants. But migrants and refugees are not the problem. In May 1994, after becoming president of South Africa, one of the first steps Nelson Mandela took was to use his first State of the Nation Address to proclaim free access to healthcare for all pregnant women and children under six through the public health service. Mandela did so because, he said: “Health remains a fundamental building block of the humane society we are determined to create through the implementation of the Reconstruction and Development Programme.”
2022-08-302022-09-02 12:00 AMDaily Maverick Editorial https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-08-30-snatching-away-mandelas-gift-of-health-as-medical-apartheid-returns/
  
Article
South Africa’s health minister Joe Phaahla said here on Monday that the country has an HIV epidemic with more than 8 million people, and certain segments of the population are disproportionately affected by HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The national HIV prevalence is estimated at 53 percent among female sex workers, 25.7 percent among men who have sex with men, 21 percent among People who inject drugs (PWID),” he said at a Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) congress in Johannesburg. Phaahla said that the government was working to ensure no one was left out of treatment.” We have prioritized the expansion of our package of combination prevention tools to include recent evidence-based long-acting HIV prevention technologies,” he said. In transgender populations, HIV positivity is as high as 49 percent, according to programmatic data.
2022-08-302022-09-02 12:00 AMNews Ghanahttps://newsghana.com.gh/south-africa-unveils-latest-data-on-hiv-epidemic/
  
Article
University of Cape Town (UCT) master’s student Sharifa Negesa uses her vacations to go back home to Uganda to join a travelling cast of Girls Alive Uganda volunteers. They visit remote schools to teach menstrual hygiene and how to make reusable, sustainable sanitary pads with basic materials. The Girls Alive Uganda initiative is empowering in poor, rural communities where young women face “period poverty”. A lack of resources and access to clean water, coupled with cultural and social taboos around menstruation, reduce them to using unhygienic absorbent material – anything from newspaper to grass and even cow dung.
2022-08-302022-09-02 12:00 AMPeople’s Post https://www.news24.com/news24/community-newspaper/peoples-post/empowering-rural-communities-about-period-poverty-20220829
  
Article
The South African medical fraternity is suffering from an exodus of nurses and doctors, leaving public hospitals in particular understaffed.
2022-08-302022-09-02 12:00 AMBusinessTechhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/government/620949/exodus-of-medical-professionals-in-south-africa-leaving-hospitals-understaffed/
  
Article
The Gauteng Department of Health (GDoH) said traditional health practitioners (THP) committees are being established in recognition of the contributions and the significant role played by THPs in the health and lives of many South Africans. “With these committees, the department aims to mobilise, organise, and institutionalise THP structures in Gauteng. These committees will ensure better co-ordination of the sector and improve communication with the department and within the traditional health practitioners themselves,” said GDoH spokesperson Motalatale Modiba.
2022-08-292022-09-02 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/the-star/news/traditional-healers-urged-to-join-new-health-structures-a556996b-0cac-482e-b6b2-aa58ffa87a03
  
Article
Two people have been nabbed for administering medication to Mpumalanga residents. Priscilla Sekhonyana, spokesperson for the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), said the pair were arrested during a joint operation between the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority (Sahpra) and SAPS in the town of Kabokweni. She said Sonto Zikalala was running the Mphilo Health Shop. “She was found selling medication and providing medical services to members of the public while not registered with the HPCSA,” Sekhonyana said.
2022-08-292022-09-02 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/news/crime-and-courts/hpcsa-busts-bogus-health-practitioners-for-selling-meds-to-mpumalanga-residents-7555ecca-5d68-46a2-ab5e-13efc83ce696
  
Article
South Africa’s teenagers are enchanted by ‘lean’, an intoxicating drink made by mixing easily accessible and cheap codeine-containing medicine with soft drinks. Kieran Gordon* woke up dazed and freezing. He was in his underwear, lying on the floor at a friend’s house in Johannesburg. Someone was fumbling with keys at the front door. A few of the other passed-out party guests stirred. Gordon, then 14, says he couldn’t remember what had happened the night before, but he recalls seeing chip packets and about 20 empty two-litre bottles of Sprite strewn on the floor. Patting around him looking for his clothes, the only thing he found was a half-full polystyrene cup – and there wasn’t time to look any further. “What’s going on here?” an angry female voice demanded. Gordon’s friend’s parents were back home. “What’s this purple stuff?” his friend’s mother wanted to know. Gordon sat up and scanned the room. His vision was blurry, he recalls, but on the kitchen counter, next to some Sprite, he saw about 10 empty bottles of cough syrup.
2022-08-292022-09-02 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-08-29-purple-menace-south-african-teens-embrace-codeine-fuelled-diy-high/
  
Article
In July, a young man in the New York are was diagnosed with polio – how did a disease America snuffed out in the 70s rebound? This June, a young man from Rockland county, New York, went to the emergency room. He’d been feverish for five days and was suffering from a stiff neck, pain in his back and abdomen, and constipation. Even more concerning, for two days his legs had been abnormally weak. Doctors suspected the man had acute flaccid myelitis – muscle weakness caused by inflammation of the spinal cord, typically stemming from a viral infection. Lab tests revealed a shocking diagnosis: the culprit was the poliovirus. Throughout the first half of the 20th century, thousands of children died or were paralyzed due to polio; there were 20,000 cases of polio-induced paralysis in 1952 alone. Polio’s eradication from the US in 1979 thanks to vaccines is one of the greatest achievements of modern medicine. In the 21st century, there had been just three known instances of polio in the US – all thought to be imported – affecting a total of 10 people, with only one involving community spread.
2022-08-292022-09-02 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/aug/29/polio-us-vaccines-new-york-rockland-county
  
Article
Healthcare workers in the public sector's HIV/Aids response unit are usually the first people patients see.  To reduce stigma and to encourage patients to take their HIV treatment - antiretroviral therapy (ART) - the national health department is training healthcare workers as part of its Welcome Back Campaign. Speaking during the Treatment Action Campaign's 7th Congress on Monday in Johannesburg, Health Minister Dr Joe Phaahla said the country had made strides in the fight against HIV/Aids. He said the department started the campaign to support the re-engagement and retention of people living with HIV who were diagnosed but never initiated on ART or those whose treatment was interrupted.
2022-08-292022-09-02 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/health/healthcare-workers-trained-to-avoid-stigmatising-hiv-patients-20220829
  
Article
Zimbabwean care workers are being tricked into coming to the UK by unscrupulous middlemen who withhold up to half their wages and force them to live in squalor. The scam, which plays on the acute shortages of nursing and care staff across Britain’s hospitals and care homes, has echoes of the debt bondage schemes recently revealed to be impacting Indonesian farmers. Zimbabwe is in economic crisis and thousands of trained care professionals are seeking employment abroad. However agencies – often run by Zimbabweans in the UK and unregulated – are exploiting them, a Telegraph investigation has found. “When you are working for an agency [in the UK], they pay you 50 per cent of your total salary,” said Jim Moyo*, who moved to the UK from Harare in November 2018 to work in a care home in Margate. “You are getting paid £14 per hour, but then these guys will pay you £7.”
2022-08-282022-09-02 12:00 AMTelegraphhttps://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/climate-and-people/how-nurses-recruited-zimbabwe-caught-uk-bonded-labour-schemes/
  
Article
Tuberculosis (TB), or TB disease, is one of the world’s leading infectious disease killers. The bacteria responsible for causing TB can live in the body for years without symptoms. This is called inactive TB or latent TB infection. Without treatment, inactive TB can become active TB disease at any time and make you sick. Once TB becomes active, it can spread from person to person through the air. Starting a conversation with your doctor is the first step to protecting your family, friends, and community from this highly contagious disease.
2022-08-262022-08-26 12:00 AMCDChttps://www.cdc.gov/thinktesttreattb/?s_cid=WS-OS-TTTB-P-HCP-TW-S-CDC-EN-20
  
Article
International humanitarian medical group, Doctors Without Borders (Médecins Sans Frontières or MSF) says several foreign nationals have been turned away from public hospitals in Tshwane by activists in what the non-governmental organisation called an intensifying xenophobic climate and politicisation of health care. MSF said ongoing “xenophobic protests” outside the Kalafong Provincial Tertiary Hospital were preventing patients, including migrants, from accessing the facility. “These actions must be rejected and should trigger urgent action by health authorities and leaders to protect access to healthcare for all,” MSF in South Africa said.
2022-08-262022-09-02 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/news/politics/foreigners-including-pregnant-women-turned-away-from-gauteng-hospitals-doctors-without-borders-00f8062e-ae8c-49da-a74d-a73aedf376ef
  
Article
Women in East and Southern Africa still die during pregnancy and childbirth due to preventable causes, said Dr. Brian Chirombo, WHO Rwanda Representative, at a high-level meeting to track progress on ending preventable maternal and newborn deaths. High-impact interventions are needed “to ensure the provision of quality maternal and newborn health care, from pre-pregnancy, antenatal, labour and delivery, as well as postpartum and neonatal periods,” he said. Significant progress has been made in improving the survival and health of pregnant women and newborns in the East and Southern Africa region. For instance, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR, or number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births) dropped by 49 per cent between 2000 and 2017. However, the MMR remains well above the global average, and the current pace of reduction is not enough to achieve the SDG targets by 2030.
2022-08-262022-09-02 12:00 AMReliefwebhttps://reliefweb.int/report/world/regional-initiative-speed-progress-ending-preventable-maternal-and-newborn-deaths-east-and-southern-africa
  
Article
Covid, HIV, Sars and Mers are all a result of humanity’s unhealthy relationship with nature. Now, one of the most relentless consequences of that toxic relationship – the climate crisis – is posing serious new health risks in Africa.  Severe droughts, like the one currently driving millions of people from their homes in the Horn of Africa, is only one example. The climate catastrophe will also make a mockery of existing infrastructure which is not designed to withstand mounting climate-related disasters. Floods, for example, which will probably increase in regularity and intensity, will destroy buildings, roads and bridges. This will lead to increased demand for medicine tailored specifically for disasters and will have far-reaching implications for temperature-sensitive pathogens. Malaria, for instance, will probably migrate to higher altitudes.
2022-08-252022-09-02 12:00 AMMail & Guardian https://mg.co.za/news/2022-08-25-heat-from-a-changing-climate-poses-a-significant-risk-to-mothers-and-babies/
  
Article
A new study identifies, as early as the 5th month of pregnancy, patterns of fetal abdominal growth associated with maternal lipid metabolites that track newborn growth, adiposity and development into childhood. These fetal growth patterns are also associated with blood flow and nutrient transfer by the placenta, demonstrating a complex interaction between maternal and fetal nutrition early in pregnancy that influences postnatal weight and eventually adult health.
2022-08-252022-09-02 12:00 AMScience Dailyhttps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/08/220825183337.htm
  
Article
In a recent study published in Indoor Air, researchers extensively searched for the origins of the resistance to recognizing airborne transmission during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic by major public health organizations, including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United States Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (US-CDC). Earlier acceptance of the evidence of airborne transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) would have reduced the effort, time, and money wasted on adhering to the use of interventions, such as surface disinfection and lateral plexiglass barriers, which were ineffective in containing COVID-19. Subsequently, the general public would have focused on ventilation, filtration, and mask use, with better fit and filters, even indoors where social distancing was feasible. Partly, the WHO and CDC were hesitant to adopt the airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 even in the face of evidence due to a conceptual error that occurred over a century ago and became embedded in the public health, epidemiology, and infection prevention fields.
2022-08-252022-09-02 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Sciencehttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20220825/Resistance-to-recognizing-airborne-transmission-of-SARS-CoV-2-may-be-rooted-in-historical-error.aspx
  
Article
South African children will have to wait until next year for the rollout of the child friendly, ‘sweet-tasting’ antiretroviral (ARV) treatment, despite this new 4-in-1 combination receiving the green light. The South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) approved the combo, which includes abacavir, lamivudine, lopinavir, and ritonavir in June. But the National Department of Health isn’t ready to roll out the treatment especially designed for infants and young children. Currently, the same combination is given to children in pill form, that’s hard to swallow.
2022-08-242022-08-26 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/08/24/dept-puts-child-friendly-arv-treatment-on-hold/
  
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“It’s really, really rewarding to know that burning the candle at both ends – the hard days in the clinic, late nights, and taking calls – traveling throughout the African continent and taking these long trips to the US for meetings paid off,” says Dr Thesla Palanee-Phillips. “It’s just really humbling to know we were part of that work.” The headline-making work the South African researcher is talking about is the ASPIRE study – a phase 3 trial of a vaginal Ring used to prevent HIV infection. The ring contains the antiretroviral drug dapivirine. The ring has been widely hailed as offering women a means to protect themselves against HIV infection that does not involve taking pills or negotiating condom use. Spotlight previously reported on the ring here, here, and here.
2022-08-242022-08-26 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/08/24/women-in-health-from-test-tubes-to-impacting-lives-dr-thesla-palanee-phillips-on-making-a-difference-with-science/
  
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Dr Leo Zekeng, UNAIDS Country Director and Representative in Nigeria, has shared how lessons from the AIDS response apply to the Monkeypox response. Dr Zekeng said: “Monkeypox is endemic in Nigeria, and in recent weeks there has been a significant increase in suspected and confirmed cases. The Nigeria Center for Disease Control (NCDC)’s most recently published sitrep (7th August 2022) indicates that in 2022 there have been over 473 suspected Monkeypox cases (407 of which are since 30th May), of which have been 172 confirmed (151 of which are since 30th May).  In the most recent weekly data published (1st to 7th August), 60 suspected cases were recorded in one week, out of which 15 were confirmed.
2022-08-242022-08-26 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/august/20220824_nigeria-monkeypox-response
  
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A basic government grant of at least R1,000 could improve the health of South Africans and reduce some of the pressure the public health system faces. This is the view of the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC), one of the civil society organisations that participated in Wednesday’s national shutdown. The national shutdown drew attention to the worsening socio-economic conditions, the rising cost of living, the unemployment rate and the poor state of the public health system.
2022-08-242022-08-26 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/08/25/nationalshutdown-fix-public-health-system/
  
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Responding to the news that the European Commission has approved an HIV treatment option designed for twice-yearly dosing, UNAIDS Executive Director Winnie Byanyima said: ‘It is great news that a range of long-acting HIV treatment options are set to come on stream. A range of options for long-acting treatments, received every few months, could enable more people to get on treatment or offer better clinical options for patients showing resistance to current regimens, therefore staying longer on treatment, and prevent many AIDS-related deaths – if they become available for all who need them. The evidence is clear: monopoly production cannot ensure global availability and affordability. Worldwide availability of affordable long-acting treatments will require the transfer of technology to enable generic production.’
2022-08-232022-08-26 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/august/20220823_eu-approval-long-acting-hiv-treatment-option
  
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The world stands at an inflexion point once more in the war against HIV. For those of us working in the field in South Africa, it feels eerily like the battle that was fought 25 years ago. At the time, I was doing my internship as a doctor at Chris Hani Baragwanath. Antiretroviral therapy was available in rich countries but not yet in Africa. It was heartbreaking to know that a simple, yet often inaccessible, intervention was the difference between suffering and relief. We knew we could make a difference. We could stop the transmission from mother to child. We could turn the tide. We could manage the medical conditions of HIV-positive patients, rendering the sickness chronic, rather than the death sentence it had been with its inevitable progression to AIDS – if only we could prescribe and dispense those life-saving ARVs. Ultimately, we were.
2022-08-232022-08-26 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/08/23/world-has-reached-another-turning-point-in-fight-against-hiv/
  
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It is estimated that in 2021, only around 0.3% of sexually active people in the Western Cape were taking antiretroviral medicines to prevent HIV infection. When taken as prescribed, such pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is about 99% effective at preventing HIV infection. The Western Cape ranks seventh among South Africa’s nine provinces on this measure – only Limpopo and the Northern Cape are doing worse. Mpumalanga is in the lead at 2.3%, followed by KwaZulu-Natal at 1.8%, and Gauteng at 1%. The estimate for South Africa as a whole is 1%. The figures are from the latest published outputs of Thembisa, the leading model of HIV in South Africa.
2022-08-232022-08-26 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/08/23/analysis-what-is-behind-the-western-capes-low-prep-numbers/
  
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Progress on vaccine supply alone isn’t enough to support sexual health services, which are critically overburdened and need additional funding now (UK trials smaller doses of monkeypox vaccine as supplies run low, 22 August). Due to a lack of support from the government, they are struggling to deal with monkeypox, HIV prevention and STIs. We’re hearing of waiting times climbing for the HIV prevention drug PrEP, and some clinics have reported a 90% reduction in their ability to provide PrEP and other services. Through inaction, the government’s promise to end HIV transmissions by 2030 will be derailed. By choosing not to give additional support, it is also choosing to risk more people being diagnosed with HIV and STIs. Deborah Gold Chief executive, National Aids Trust, Dr Will Nutland Co-founder, PrEPster, Ian Green Chief executive, Terrence Higgins Trust.
2022-08-232022-08-26 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/aug/23/the-uk-government-is-dangerously-neglecting-sexual-health-services
  
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WHO is issuing a public call for data, appealing to industry, researchers, national TB programmes and other agencies to provide suitable evidence on the performance of these technologies. The obtained data will be essential to facilitate the process of WHO policy updates, scheduled to start at the end of 2022.
2022-08-222022-08-26 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news-room/articles-detail/public-call-for-data-on-targeted-next-generation-sequencing-solutions-for-detection-of-drug-resistance-among-people-diagnosed-with-tuberculosis
  
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This week we’re talking to adventurer, traveller, former ballet dancer and above all – walker – Jonatan Montoya… His ‘Against the Odds’ moments in his life include his mother’s well-meaning but misguided childhood health tips, surviving a near-miss car crash while selling bootleg records on the street, avoiding becoming a professional ballet dancer, and his own mental health struggles as he grew up. Jon’s motivation for his mega walk is to raise awareness and understanding of HIV. He reflects on his own fear of being infected with the disease as a teenager, a fear that grew to the point that he became celibate.
2022-08-182022-08-22 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/august/20220804_against-the-odds-podcast
  
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The World Health Organization (WHO) is releasing new guidance to support national strategic planning for tuberculosis (TB) response. The guidance encourages the use of a people-centeric focus in the development of national TB strategic plan (NSP). It highlights the importance of government stewardship and ownership, promotes alignment with national health strategy and other health programmes, emphasizes multi stakeholder and multi-sectoral engagement as one of the key steps for multisectoral accountability for TB.
2022-08-182022-08-22 12:00 AMWHOhttps://www.devdiscourse.com/article/health/2147740-who-releases-newguidanceon-national-strategic-planning-for-tuberculosis
  
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Advocates from around the world came together at the U=U Global Summit at the 24th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2022) in Montreal last month to share successes and challenges that continue to hamper full-scale integration of the ‘Undetectable = Untransmittable’ (U=U) message in diverse global contexts. A central theme was that structural barriers – especially poverty, limited access to treatment and viral load testing, stigma, and widespread inequalities – continue to shape health outcomes. HIV criminalisation is also a formidable barrier in many contexts, and advocates discussed the possible role of U=U in challenging HIV criminal laws.
2022-08-172022-08-22 12:00 AMAidsmaphttps://www.aidsmap.com/news/aug-2022/challenges-integrating-uu-hiv-care-around-world
  
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Health Minister Dr Joe Phaala is expected to reveal details of the county’s response to Monkeypox on Friday. Phaala announced that a fourth Monkeypox virus case was identified in SA.  The patient is a 28-year-old man from the Western Cape who has a travel history to Spain and returned to South Africa in the second week of August 2022. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was performed in a private pathology laboratory, and the samples were submitted to the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD ) for sequencing analysis. Public health response measures to prevent the spread of the infection, including contact tracing, have been instituted. The fourth case follows three unlinked laboratory-confirmed Monkeypox cases reported from Gauteng, Western Cape and Limpopo provinces.
2022-08-172022-08-22 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/08/17/monkeypox-vaccine-on-the-cards-as-sa-records-fourth-case/
  
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Francesca Conradie knew she wanted to be a doctor when she was eight years old. Well, that, or a truck driver. It was one of her family’s weekly trips to the local library that helped make the decision clear. While flipping through the pages of Dr Christiaan Barnard’s autobiography ‘One Life’ and reading about the man who performed the world’s first heart transplant, Conradie knew that she wanted to pursue a career in medicine. Back then there were not many female doctors, something Conradie was determined to change.
2022-08-172022-08-22 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/08/17/women-in-health-francesca-conradie-from-hiv-to-groundbreaking-tb-research/
  
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Affecting around 20% of pregnant women in low and middle income countries, mental-health issues like depression and anxiety are common during pregnancy and the first year after birth, with consequences for both mothers and their infants. Africa’s health systems, and particularly mental-health infrastructure, may not be adequately serving women on the continent, who often experience intense suffering if left untreated. “A period of heightened emotions, and often great joy, pregnancy also brings anxiety and uncertainty into women’s lives. It’s a tumultuous time during which roles and relationships shift.
2022-08-162022-08-22 12:00 AMBizCommunityhttps://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/148/230611.html
  
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Incident tuberculosis (TB) appears to be a risk factor for virologic non-suppression (ie, viral load of >1,000 copies/mL) in HIV patients who have transitioned to dolutegravir (DTG)-based therapy with recycled NRTIs*, according to a retrospective subanalysis of the VISEND study. “It is so important to look for the occurrence of TB in patients on DTG-based therapy, especially when transitioning them to second-line therapy with recycled NRTIs,” said presenting author Dr Nyuma Mbewe from the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, at AIDS 2022. “Because if not, this is a possibility for emergent DTG resistance and … [TB IRIS**] whilst they do have TB.” “Whilst there have been some studies … that did not show any TB-associated IRIS, we felt that the situation would be different in our patient population, especially as Zambia is one of the top 30 countries in the world with TB and HIV co-infections,” she continued.
2022-08-162022-08-22 12:00 AMMIMS Respirologyhttps://specialty.mims.com/topic/does-tb-influence-viral-suppression-in-hiv-patients-on-dtg-based-therapy-
  
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The pharmaceutical company GSK has been awarded a contract to produce the world’s first malaria vaccine so that millions more children will be protected against the killer disease, the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) announced on Tuesday. The landmark award, valued at up to $170 million, will lead to 18 million doses of the RTS,S vaccine being available over the next three years, potentially saving thousands of young lives annually. Malaria remains one of the biggest killers of children under five.  In 2020, nearly half a million boys and girls died from the disease in Africa alone, a rate of one death every minute.
2022-08-162022-08-22 12:00 AMUnited Nationshttps://news.un.org/en/story/2022/08/1124812
  
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On Friday, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened with a group of global experts who have agreed on new names for monkeypox virus variants, as part of ongoing efforts to align the names of the monkeypox disease, virus and variants—or clades—with current best practices. To ensure current best practice, experts have stated that newly-identified viruses, related diseases, and virus variants should be given names with the aim of avoiding “offense to any cultural, social, national, regional, professional, or ethnic groups, and minimize any negative impact on trade, travel, tourism or animal welfare”. “The monkeypox virus was named upon first discovery in 1958, before current best practices in naming diseases and viruses were adopted. Similarly for the name of the disease it causes. Major variants were identified by the geographic regions where they were known to circulate,” WHO said in a statement.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMForbes Africahttps://www.forbesafrica.com/current-affairs/2022/08/15/who-to-give-monkeypox-virus-variants-new-name-to-eradicate-stigmas-associated-with-the-disease/
  
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Anti-gender-based violence activists have decried the number of instances where the victims and their families were not consulted before offenders were released on parole. The latest data provided by the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) showed that in 2021/22 the Western Cape had recorded 11 instances where victims were not consulted compared with 947 instances in KwaZulu-Natal. The statistics reflected the lowest numbers for the Free State and Northern Cape where only 7 victims had not been consulted.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/capeargus/news/gbv-activists-unimpressed-with-the-lack-of-victim-consultation-when-it-comes-to-parole-5efc281a-43ec-4b24-87ee-2a8e5db8314b
  
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Phaahla said the patient is a 28-year-old man from the Western Cape who recently travelled to Spain. The man returned from the European country in the second week of August.  “A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was performed in a private pathology laboratory, and the samples were submitted to the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) for sequencing analysis. Public health response measures to prevent the spread of the infection, including contact tracing, have been instituted,” Phaahla said in a statement.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/health/fourth-monkeypox-case-confirmed-in-the-western-cape-20220815
  
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There are many pre-conference meetings that lead up to each International AIDS Society conference. One of the most eagerly awaited, by researchers and treatment activists alike, is run by the Towards an HIV Cure research consortium. The 2022 meeting, held before the 24th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2022), was titled 'Pathways to an HIV cure: Research and advocacy priorities' and this reflected a feeling in the HIV cure research community that, as we said in a report on a previous Towards an HIV Cure meeting, “targets were proliferating” in HIV cure research, and they needed a structure. There was a feeling that researchers were pursuing a number of different and even contradictory hypotheses and needed to reach a consensus on the priority of discoveries that needed to be made, and the order in which we needed to make them, to bring coherence to the field.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMAidsmaphttps://www.aidsmap.com/news/aug-2022/we-still-have-no-hiv-cure-we-have-better-strategy-finding-one
  
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Ameasles outbreak has killed 80 children in Zimbabwe since April, the ministry of health has said, blaming church sect gatherings for the surge. In a statement seen by Reuters on Sunday, the ministry said the outbreak had now spread nationwide, with a case fatality rate of 6.9%. Health Secretary Jasper Chimedza said that as of Thursday, 1,036 suspected cases and 125 confirmed cases had been reported since the outbreak, with Manicaland in eastern Zimbabwe accounting for most infections. "The ministry of health and child care wishes to inform the public that the ongoing outbreak of measles which was first reported on 10th of April has since spread nationwide following church gatherings," Chimedza said in a statement.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMReutershttps://www.devdiscourse.com/article/health/2143847-zimbabwe-blames-measles-surge-on-sect-gatherings-after-80-children-die
  
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Virtual health care was adopted more widely during the COVID-19 pandemic, with many people accessing health-care providers remotely. However, easy and convenient access to technology means some people may choose to bypass health care and consult Dr. Google directly, with online self-diagnosis. Here is a common scenario: picture someone sitting at home, when suddenly their head starts pounding, their eyes start to itch and their heart rate rises. They reach for their phone or laptop to quickly Google what can possibly be wrong. It’s possible that the search results could offer accurate answers about the cause of the person’s symptoms. Or the search might erroneously suggest they’re well on their way to an early death. As a researcher in the virtual care domain, I’m aware that online self-diagnosis has become very common, and that technology has shifted the way health care is delivered.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/the-rise-of-dr-google-the-risks-of-self-diagnosis-and-searching-symptoms-online-180278
  
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Doxycycline post-exposure prophylaxis within three days after sex lowered the risk of gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis. Gay men and transgender women living with HIV or on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) who took the antibiotic doxycycline within 72 hours after sex had a significantly lower risk of gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis, according to a study presented at the 24th International AIDS Conference in Montreal. “Using doxycycline after condomless sex has potential as an effective strategy to substantially reduce sexually transmitted infections in targeted populations with ongoing high rates of STIs,” study investigator Annie Luetkemeyer, MD, of the University of California at San Francisco, told POZ.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AMPOZhttps://www.poz.com/article/taking-antibiotics-sex-reduces-sti-risk
  
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Researchers have created a mathematical model to predict genetic resistance to antimalarial drugs in Africa to help manage one of the biggest threats to global malarial control. Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites and spread to humans through infected mosquitoes. It is preventable and curable, yet resistance to current antimalarial drugs is causing an avoidable loss of life. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were an estimated 241 million cases of malaria worldwide in 2020, with over 600,000 deaths. To tackle this issue, an international research team used data from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN), a global, scientifically independent collaboration, to map the prevalence of genetic markers that show resistance to Plasmodium falciparum – the parasite that causes malaria. Lead author associate professor Jennifer Flegg from the University of Melbourne said malaria has devastating impacts on lower-income countries and effective treatment is key to elimination.
2022-08-152022-08-22 12:00 AME & T https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2022/08/mathematical-modelling-could-help-in-fight-against-malaria/
  
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For 100 years, the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has been used in tuberculosis (TB) prevention.  Although the vaccine is given to at least 100 million people annually, researchers have always questioned its effectiveness. TB affects at least 10 million people a year across the world. A new study, The Lancet Global Health, by Boston University School of Public Health researchers, found the BCG vaccination at birth provides significant protection against TB, but only among children under five years old.
2022-08-122022-08-22 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/health/bcg-vaccine-prevents-tb-in-young-children-but-not-adults-new-study-20220812
  
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Many patients who have experienced an episode at risk of HIV transmission (typically unprotected sexual intercourse with an unknown person or the use of needles in drug addiction) wonder what the early signs of a possible, dreaded HIV infection are.
2022-08-122022-08-22 12:00 AMEmergency Livehttps://www.emergency-live.com/health-and-safety/hiv-initial-symptoms-in-women-and-men/
  
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Less than three years after the discovery of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, researchers found another virus that spreads from animals to humans. The findings appear in the New England Journal of Medicine. The Langya virus was detected in nearly three dozen people in the provinces of Shandong and Henan in the eastern parts of the country.
2022-08-122022-08-22 12:00 AMMedical News Todayhttps://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/new-langya-virus-found-in-china-what-to-know-about-symptoms-transmission#Langya:-A-zoonotic-virus
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