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Johannesburg’s public health services are on life support and the prognosis is poor. There are no signs of urgency to bring Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) back on line to full function after a fire forced it to close. Not far away, both Helen Joseph and Rahima Moosa hospitals are operating under extremely difficult conditions: their water supply has been intermittent for days. CMJAH is one of the biggest hospitals in the southern hemisphere. It was closed in April after a fire that started in an underground parking area caused a section of the hospital to collapse, rendering the entire facility unsafe. Since then patients and staff have been relocated to other hospitals at considerable cost to the overburdened health network. The Gauteng Health Department and the Gauteng Department of Infrastructure Development insist they are acting as swiftly as possible to reopen the hospital. But six weeks after the fire the facility remains closed. No one will commit to a timeframe for when repairs and safety compliance will be completed. So-called contingencies for alternative arrangements for patient care are also not translating into actual care for many patients and there are still no answers as to who dropped the ball in the first place to allow a flagship national healthcare asset literally to go up in smoke.
2021-06-272021-06-04 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-30-poor-prognosis-joburgs-public-healthcare-is-in-critical-condition/
  
Article
Effective and binding action is urgently required to protect the millions of children, adolescents and expectant mothers worldwide whose health is jeopardized by the informal processing of discarded electrical or electronic devices according to a new ground-breaking report from the World Health Organization: Children and Digital Dumpsites. “With mounting volumes of production and disposal, the world faces what one recent international forum described as a mounting “tsunami of e-waste”, putting lives and health at risk,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. "In the same way the world has rallied to protect the seas and their ecosystems from plastic and microplastic pollution, we need to rally to protect our most valuable resource –the health of our children – from the growing threat of e-waste.” As many as 12.9 million women are working in the informal waste sector, which potentially exposes them to toxic e-waste and puts them and their unborn children at risk.
2021-06-152021-06-21 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/15-06-2021-soaring-e-waste-affects-the-health-of-millions-of-children-who-warns
  
Article
Member States at the High-Level Meeting on HIV and AIDS adopted a Political Declaration in order to get the world on track to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030. Re-committing to urgent action over the next five years, Member States agreed to a number of key focus areas which are highlighted in the article.
2021-06-112021-06-21 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/11-06-2021-new-hiv-aids-political-declaration-seeks-to-end-inequalities-and-get-on-track-to-end-aids-by-2030#.YMYsyWkfJWQ.twitter
  
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Why does WHO recommend at this time, in June 2021, that vaccinating children is not a priority? When would their vaccination be prioritized? How is safety of these vaccines ensured? WHO’s Chief Scientist Dr Soumya Swaminathan explains in Science in 5
2021-06-112021-06-21 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/media-resources/science-in-5/episode-42---vaccines-and-children
  
Article
Government plans to move forward with the implementation and establishment of a National Health Insurance Scheme (NHI) in South Africa – with phase two of the scheme scheduled to begin in 2022. However, there is a glaring lack of clarity around the roadmap for the scheme – and a legal minefield covering the current processes, says legal firm Werksmans Attorneys. According to the firm, the processes are divided into two phases, with phase one setting out certain objectives that have to be met on or before 31 December 2021.
2021-06-092021-06-15 12:00 AMBusiness Techhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/government/497353/9-massive-problems-with-governments-nhi-plans-which-still-need-to-be-addressed-before-the-end-of-the-year/
  
Article
Cryptococcal meningitis is the second biggest killer of people living with HIV after tuberculosis (TB). For decades it has flown under the radar – despite its high mortality rate – but it is finally getting the attention it deserves with the launch of a new global initiative to end deaths due to this fungal brain infection by 2030.The initiative, launched by the United States Centre for Disease Control, Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) and UNITAID last month, aims to get the gold standard drug to treat cryptococcal meningitis – flucytosine – registered in countries that need it. Flucytosine is still not registered in South Africa although sub-Saharan Africa accounts for over 75% of cryptococcal meningitis deaths. That it remains unregistered is due to a combination of market failures and a lack of generic players in the field although the drug is over 50 years old and off-patent.
2021-06-082021-06-15 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2021/06/08/in-focus-global-strategy-to-end-cryptococcal-meningitis-in-people-living-with-hiv/
  
Article
Share in Life Healthcare Group – a South African private hospital operator – soared in trade on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange on Tuesday (8 June), after the US Food and Drugs Administration approved Biogen’s Alzheimer’s drug. Biogen Inc’s controversial Alzheimer’s disease therapy was approved by US regulators, a landmark decision that stands to dramatically change treatment for the debilitating brain condition, Bloomberg reported. The Food and Drug Administration granted the antibody therapy an accelerated approval, meaning that Biogen will need to conduct more research to establish its benefits for it to remain on the market. CCMDD: “The right medicine, for the right patient, in the right parcel, in the right place, at the right time.”
2021-06-082021-06-15 12:00 AMBusiness Techhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/business/496905/south-african-healthcare-company-soars-after-alzheimers-drug-approval/
  
Article
This week civil society will join political leaders in discussing the next 10 years of action against the Aids epidemic, the climate crisis and a pan-African future. This week the next decade of the global response to the HIV epidemic will be determined in South Africa and abroad. From Tuesday 8 June to Thursday 10 June, the United Nations will convene the High-Level Meeting on Aids. The General Assembly will assess how the impact of the epidemic has been reduced over the past five years and will adopt a “new political declaration” to steer the next decades’ action against HIV. This meeting will convene a week after the 40th anniversary after the first cases of HIV was identified. Browse the extensive list of events here.
2021-06-072021-06-15 12:00 AMMaverick Citizenhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-06-07-this-week-a-new-road-map-to-an-hiv-free-world-in-the-next-decade/?utm_campaign=snd-autopilot
  
Article
The research released by Percept this week shows the real potential of technology in the effective delivery of primary healthcare services across South Africa. The research should thus be used as a road map to better healthcare services for all. By Shivani Ranchod, CEO of Percept. We looked at practical examples from across Africa and investigated how other countries used technology in their specific environments. Our work shows that a lot can be achieved despite existing problems such as poor technological literacy, poor uptake of smartphone capabilities, and poor power supply. We will be sharing our findings with key stakeholders in the health sector and hope that it will be valuable for their work improving healthcare service delivery for all. While Covid-19-linked recessions have highlighted the need for healthcare models that deliver primary healthcare in more cost-effective ways, the lockdowns have also created vast opportunities for the rapid growth and evolution of tech-enabled healthcare delivery models. In time, technological solutions will increasingly ensure that healthcare systems run more efficiently and effectively. It is their focus on specific points of the patient journey, or specific parts of the system, that their ability to ensure overall continuity of care and continued engagement with the primary healthcare system will require ongoing attentio
2021-06-032021-06-04 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2021/06/03/op-ed-govt-urged-to-embrace-the-power-of-tech-in-the-delivery-of-primary-healthcare-for-all/
  
Article
Health groups are seeking further clarity around the exact details and workings of South Africa’s new National Health Insurance (NHI) – specifically asking questions about how money is going to be pooled to fund the scheme. Presenting to parliament on the NHI on Tuesday (1 June), the Khayelitsha and Klipfonetin health forums said that a proper analysis is needed to see whether South Africa is in a financial position to even fund the NHI. The analysis should also look at whether there is sufficient trust by the public that government will be able to deliver an NHI that is inclusive of community participation in all facets, it said.
2021-06-032021-06-04 12:00 AMBusiness Techhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/finance/495047/the-end-of-medical-aids-in-south-africa-and-other-questions-raised-around-the-nhi/
  
Article
Protecting all children living in South Africa is a top priority for this year’s Child Protection Week. It was launched under the theme “Let us all protect children during and beyond Covid-19”. The launch included the voices of children from across all nine provinces, with a special focus on child migrants. According to the United Nations Children’s Fund, UNICEF,  one in four migrants who are living in South Africa are children, that’s about 642 000 migrant and refugee children estimated to be living in the country. Deputy Minister of Social Development Henrietta Bogopane-Zulu emphasised the importance of ensuring that undocumented child migrants who are in the country either as refugees, asylum seekers or were born in South Africa to migrant women, are documented. “As we launch child protection week, one of the most important campaigns we as Social Development need to drive, together with Home Affairs and Health, is to educate foreign women of the importance of that piece of paper [recognition of birth document] because that child remains stateless until such time the holder of the recognition of birth document can put the child in the population register,” said Bogopane-Zulu.
2021-06-022021-06-04 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2021/06/02/child-protection-week-protecting-all-children-living-in-south-africa/
  
Article
The department of health is pushing forward on a draft bill in an effort to get more stringent anti-smoking laws passed. The department’s Lynn Moeng told EWN that the Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill is currently in the pipeline, and that government is working as ‘fast as it can’ to have it processed. “We are now finalising the process and once we have done that before it even gets to Cabinet, it needs to be approved by a few technical committees,” she said. “We are in the process where we’ll now be able to submit to the various committees.”
2021-06-022021-06-04 12:00 AMBusiness Techhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/lifestyle/495263/government-to-introduce-stricter-anti-smoking-rules-for-south-africa/
  
Article
The National Healthcare Professionals Association (NHCPA) have questioned the establishment of South Africa’s new National Health Insurance (NHI) and the government’s ability to run it. Presenting to parliament on Wednesday (26 May), NHCPA president Dr Benny Malakoane said that the organisation broadly supported the bill and its objects. However, he raised concerns around the NHI Fund and how it will be run – citing the failure of other state-owned companies in recent years. “Unfortunately following the finalisation on NHI it will be the biggest parastatal in the country and given government track record with parastatals, one has to be really concerned,” he said.
2021-05-272021-05-28 12:00 AMBusiness Tech https://businesstech.co.za/news/government/493821/health-professionals-are-worried-that-the-nhi-will-become-the-eskom-or-saa-of-healthcare-in-south-africa/
  
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Women who cannot afford silicone prostheses or breast reconstruction will benefit from the Knit-for-Cansa project. Women who have had a mastectomy [a surgical removal of the breast] and cannot afford breast reconstruction surgery or silicone prostheses are set to benefit from the Knit-for-Cansa project which aims to provide at least 2 000 women with knitted prosthetic breasts. Helping Hand and the Cancer Society of South Africa (Cansa) joined forces to have these knitted breasts ready in time for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October. “This year, in collaboration with Cansa and the FroueVonds, we are tackling the Knit-for-Cansa Project under the banner of #BosomFriends,” says Benette Welman, Project Organiser at Solidarity Helping Hand and the FroueVonds.
2021-05-262021-05-28 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/05/26/2-000-breast-cancer-survivors-set-to-benefit-from-knitted-prosthetic-breasts
  
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In an article on 24 May, GroundUp editor Nathan Geffen and Spotlight editor Marcus Low questioned the slow rollout of vaccines in the first week of the programme, suggesting changes that could be made to speed up the process. Here, Nicholas Crisp, deputy director-general in the National Department of Health, responds.
2021-05-262021-05-28 12:00 AMDaily Maverick https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-26-right-of-reply-vaccine-rollout-its-not-so-simple-argues-health-department/
  
Article
Mental wellness and stability is a fragile gift that we often take for granted until it is threatened or completely stripped away from us. I am a medical doctor who has been living with bipolar disorder since the tender age of 14. My illness is older than my medical degree as a result.  Despite this, my accolades have often been undermined because of the stigma that results from my vulnerable state of relapse. In South Africa, 26 May marks Bipolar Awareness Day on the mental health calendar. Unfortunately, many are unaware of this day including those of us who live with this illness.
2021-05-262021-05-28 12:00 AMMail & Guardian https://mg.co.za/opinion/2021-05-26-doctors-have-mental-health-issues-too/
  
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New guidance from the World Health Organization (WHO) sets essential standards to inform future research and development on genetically modified mosquitoes, particularly in addressing issues relating to ethics, safety, affordability and effectiveness.
2021-05-192021-05-28 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/19-05-2021-who-issues-new-guidance-for-research-on-genetically-modified-mosquitoes-to-fight-malaria-and-other-vector-borne-diseases
  
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A leading child health specialist has described the exposure of children to second-hand cigarette smoke and other electronic nicotine delivery devices, such as e-cigarettes and vapers, as similar to squeezing life out of children and taking the breath out of their lungs. Prof Anthony Westwood, a retired paediatrician from Red Cross Children’s Hospital and lecturer at the University of Cape Town's department of child and adolescent health, said exposing children to nicotine not only denied them a choice not to get addicted, but could also have devastating consequences to their developing brains.
2021-05-122021-05-14 12:00 AMTimes Live https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2021-05-12-exposing-children-to-smoking-is-like-suffocating-them-child-health-expert/
  
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This year’s World Obesity Day theme was ‘Every Body Needs Everybody’, because we all have a role to play in supporting and advocating for people living with obesity. How big is the problem of overweight and obesity in South Africa? Obesity is a public health problem in South Africa. The results of national surveys show an increase in obesity, particularly among women 45-55 years old, but also among preschool children and adolescents.
2021-05-122021-05-14 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/health24/diet-and-nutrition/opinion-obesity-in-south-africa-every-body-needs-everybody-20210512
  
Article
The largest genetic study ever undertaken of South Africans has challenged the presumption that all southeastern Bantu-speaking groups are a single genetic entity – and this has a huge implication for the study of diseases. The southeastern Bantu language family includes isiZulu, isiXhosa, siSwati, Xitsonga, Tshivenda, Sepedi, Sesotho and Setswana. Despite linguistic differences, these groups of people are treated mostly as a single group in genetic studies. Almost 80% of South Africans speak one of the southeastern Bantu languages as their first language. Their origins can be traced to farmers of west central Africa, whose descendants over the past 2,000 years spread south of the equator and into southern Africa. Professor Michèle Ramsay, director of the Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bio-science at the University of the Witwatersrand University (Wits) and the corresponding author of the study, said to investigate this, “the largest study with genome-wide genotyping in South African populations was undertaken with 5,000 participants. This is a very detailed analysis of genetic markers across the whole genome.”
2021-05-092021-05-14 12:00 AMMaverick Citizen https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-05-09-how-migration-events-have-dramatically-reshaped-the-genetic-landscape-of-africa/
  
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WHO’s latest global survey on implementation of national infection prevention and control programmes highlights the urgent need to reduce inequalities in the availability of good hand hygiene and other infection prevention and control measures between high and lower income countries. A new WHO online monitoring portal will help countries identify and address gaps. This is a serious challenge at any time, but COVID-19 has dramatically demonstrated just how important good hand hygiene practices are in reducing the risk of transmission, when used as part of a comprehensive package of preventative measures. Good hand hygiene is also vital in preventing any infections acquired in health care, the spread of antimicrobial resistance and other emerging health threats. Infection acquired during health care delivery is a major global health problem, but patients in low- and middle-income countries are twice as likely to experience this as patients in high-income countries (15% and 7% of patients respectively); the risk in intensive care units (ICU), especially among newborns, is between 2 and 20 times higher. One reason for this is that in some low-income countries only 1 in 10 health workers practices proper hand hygiene while caring for patients at high risk of health care-associated infections in ICU - often because they simply do not have the facilities to do so.
2021-05-052021-05-07 12:00 AMWorld Health Organizationhttps://www.who.int/news/item/05-05-2021-who-calls-for-better-hand-hygiene-and-other-infection-control-practices
  
Article
The 2021 State of the World’s Midwifery report, launched on Wednesday by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), the UN World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Confederation of Midwives, said that fully resourcing midwife-delivered care by 2035 would avert roughly two-thirds of maternal, newborn deaths and stillbirths, saving 4.3 million lives per year. Natalia Kanem, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), highlighted the “enormous impact” midwives have on women and their families. “A capable, well-trained midwife can have an enormous impact on childbearing women and their families – an impact often passed on from one generation to the next.” “At UNFPA, we have spent more than a decade strengthening education, enhancing working conditions and supporting leadership roles for the midwifery profession. We have seen that these efforts work”, she added. The report called on governments to provide an enabling work environment for midwives, free from gender-related stigma, violence and discrimination. It also urged greater investment in the education and training of midwives and midwife-led service delivery, and midwifery leadership and governance. Appointing senior midwives as leaders at country level would provide a significant lever for building capacity, it noted.
2021-05-052021-05-07 12:00 AMUnited Nations https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/05/1091282
  
Article
Many South Africans with blood diseases and cancers are dying because they cannot find bone marrow donors. The South African Bone Marrow Registry (SABMR) is urgently seeking more people of colour to register as donors — to help give more South Africans a better shot at a second chance at life. Every year, thousands of people around the world reach a critical point in their medical journey where the only possible cure for their condition is a bone marrow transplant. But because donors are usually found in a patient’s ethnic group, and with people of colour representing only 30% of all registered donors in South Africa, many South Africans may not find their lifesaving match in time— and many don’t survive. Having more donors will improve the chances that a patient will be able to find their match. But getting more people to register means correcting longstanding misconceptions about what it means to be a bone marrow donor. Because, as it turns out, being a donor is not as painful, invasive or permanent as many people believe.
2021-05-052021-05-07 12:00 AMGounduphttps://www.groundup.org.za/article/black-donors-needed-help-save-lives/
  
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The Health Systems Trust reports that the Central Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) programme has alleviated an overburdened and under-resourced public health system, reports Lilita Gcwabe. “Because we serve such a large community, there would often be elderly patients having to arrive as early as 6AM in order to collect their medicine,” Dr. Dimakatso Letsie at the George Mukhari Academic Hospital. “Many of whom travel from areas that are further away and end up being hungry during the day while they wait in the long queues.” Long queues of patients waiting for their chronic medication is a common sight at public hospitals. They are also a sign of an over-burdened health system, in which health care workers struggle to prioritise patients due to the sheer numbers.  The Central Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) programme eases this burden by enabling patients to pick up their medication away from the crowded clinic. A new report by the Health Systems Trust shows that the programme is working to make collecting chronic medication more accessible.
2021-05-032021-05-07 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2021/05/03/central-chronic-medicine-dispensing-and-distribution-ccmdd-programme/
  
Article
The National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) published its latest Covid-19 modelling report, looking at how the spread of the virus could accelerate in the coming months, bringing about a third wave of infections locally. According to the NICD, the purpose of the report is to assist government planners and decision makers – as well as the general public – to track the start of the third wave, as well as provide planning support. The NICD said that that the data does not predict when the third wave will hit, but rather what shape it will take and what will drive it. In this regard, it said that seasonal factors will play a part, echoing views from medical experts who believe the third wave will likely hit around the end of May entering June, coinciding with the shift to winter.
2021-05-032021-05-07 12:00 AMBusinessTechhttps://businesstech.co.za/news/government/487615/covid-19-third-wave-warning-for-south-africa-what-to-expect/
  
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Compliance with the Protection of Personal Information Act No. 4 of 2013 (POPIA) will be mandatory for all sectors in South Africa from 1 July 2021. To promote understanding and compliance with POPIA within the research community in South Africa, a Code of Conduct for Research is being developed through a transparent and consultative process led by the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf). The Commentary by Adams and colleagues describes the purpose and process of the Code of Conduct for Research which, it is envisaged, will be submitted by ASSAf to the Information Regulator by early June 2021.
2021-05-032021-05-14 12:00 AMSouth African Journal of Sciencehttps://sajs.co.za/issue/view/832
  
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2021-04-262021-05-07 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/article/2021-04-26-four-factors-blocking-medicines-made-in-africa/
  
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South Africa’s first National  tuberculosis (TB) prevalence  survey has been commissioned by the National Department of Health and aims to determine the bacteriological or laboratory confirmed prevalence of TB disease in South Africa by enrolling an estimated 55 000 participants.
2018-02-052018-02-19 12:00 AMNational Department of Health http://www.mrc.ac.za/Media/2018/3press2018.htm
  
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Political commitment to sustained and predictable investment in a robust HIV science agenda must be strengthened.
2017-07-192017-07-20 12:00 AMIAS 2017http://www.ias2017.org/The-Paris-Statement-HIV-Science-Matters
  
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  <div>In remembrance of Nkosi Johnson, written by Health Systems Trust's Head of Business Development and Communications, Innocent Nkata&#58;<br><br>This month we remember Xolani Nkosi aka Nkosi Johnson, the South African boy whose story left an indelible mark in the fight against HIV. Nkosi was born with HIV on 4 February 1989, at a time when the South African government was still denying the reality of HIV, refusing to provide life-saving drugs. Nkosi became a devoted activist for the rights of children living with HIV. Delivering the keynote speech at the 13th International AIDS Conference, he remarked&#58;<br><br>&quot;Care for us and accept us — we are all human beings. We are normal. We have hands. We have feet. We can walk, we can talk, we have needs just like everyone else—don't be afraid of us — we are all the same!&quot;<br><br>Nkosi lost his battle with HIV on 1 June 2001 at the age of 12. We have come a long way since then. Today, 3.4 million people are on antiretroviral therapy in South Africa alone; globally, new HIV infections among children are down from 490 000 to 150 000. But even one child born with HIV is still one too many. Although Nkosi was posthumously awarded the International Children's Peace Prize, the ultimate tribute to his life will be to bring down the number of children born with HIV to zero.<br><br>Thank you Nkosi for your life so sadly cut short but you left us a legacy and in your name we shall fight until HIV is history.</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-06-012017-06-23 12:00 AMLinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6275953973677694976/">https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6275953973677694976
  
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  <div>South Africa has a dire shortage of registered nurses, yet those wanting to enter the profession are now finding a closed door.<br><br>The pipeline of registered nurses in South Africa has ‘paused’ – and hospitals and students are being affected by legislative bungles halting the flow of skills into the sector. To add fuel to the fire, working conditions discourage retention.<br>The sequence of events is startling, especially for a country where, according to Moneyweb calculations and South African Nursing Council (SANC) statistics, there were only 5.14 nurses per 1 000 people in 2016.<br><br>Dr Wilmot James, DA shadow minister of health, notes in his Politicsweb article here&#58; “Having a critical mass of professional nurses in hospitals reduces the risk of patients dying by 8%.” It also significantly cuts the incidence of patients acquiring additional health problems while in hospital.<br><br>“We have a significant shortage of qualified professional nurses,” says Debbie Regensberg from the Society of Private Nurse Practitioners of SA. “And the shortage is about to become critical.”</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-06-012017-06-23 12:00 AMMoneyWebhttps://www.moneyweb.co.za/news/industry/alarming-bureaucratic-bungling-has-potentially-deadly-consequences-for-us-all
  
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  <div>You did it. And when the celebrations began after your election as Director-General of WHO last week, it seemed so obvious that you would. You have high-level political experience, you made major contributions to strengthening Ethiopia's health system, and you are adept at navigating the treacherous waters of international health politics. The debates you took part in, the public scrutiny of your manifesto, and the transparency of the election process have not only strengthened WHO's reputation, but also enhanced your legitimacy. You begin your term of office with more political capital than any Director-General I can recall. So what do you do with it? Some have said that it's in Africa that WHO's performance will be judged. That's a nice sentiment. But it is wrong. WHO is a global institution, and you now represent the world, not Africa alone. One weakness of democracy is that it encourages candidates for office to make big promises. You made several—delivering universal health coverage, protecting countries from health emergencies, strengthening the front-line work of WHO, transforming WHO into a world-class institution, and putting accountability at the heart of the agency's culture. Yet, as you acknowledged&#58; “It's going to be tough.”<br><br>You will receive much wise advice. You already have a transition team. You have time to think before you take up your appointment on July 1. What follows isn't advice. It's simply a few reflections on what might make the difference between success and failure. First, it's not all about you. You will be Director-General of WHO. But your success depends on the quality of the team you appoint—your deputy, your chief-of-staff, your assistant director-generals, and your directors. Your predecessors have sometimes resented sharing the limelight with colleagues. They have criticised senior staff for seeking to advance their own agendas. They have succumbed to trading jobs for favours. Don't repeat their mistakes. Appoint the best and most respected people you can find. Promote and celebrate their successes. Love your staff. It is their work that will rejuvenate WHO's role in global health. Second, think strategically. You can't do everything. Choose a limited number of objectives to achieve during the next 5 years. Third, don't waste the goodwill you begin with on more WHO reform. It will sap your strength, drag you into endless debates about process, and pander to those who already hate multilateral institutions. Instead, use what you have—an influential network of regional and country offices—to translate your values and priorities into tangible actions and results. Finally, stick to your deepest and most heartfelt principles. You said last week that health is a rights issue. Indeed, it is. Challenge every Head of State to make it so.<br><br>You take over WHO at a difficult moment in its history. Ebola left the agency bruised and apologetic. You must rebuild trust and confidence in the organisation. That means recognising WHO's special strengths. There are three. Science. Evidence is a political instrument. The global health research community is your friend. Use us. Make us part of WHO's wider work. We may not always agree with you. But science and the accumulation of reliable knowledge are a powerful means of resistance to the forces that undermine health. Convening power. Whatever the critics of global institutions might say—and they are today in the ascendancy—WHO's ability to use its moral leadership to accelerate progress on health remains undiluted. Your predecessors have often been risk averse in leading the international community. The mantra of serving member states has made the agency fearful, defensive, overcautious, reactive, weak, craven, timid, unimaginative, pusillanimous, and even paranoid. Be courageous. The voice of the voiceless. Politics—and health—is about people. WHO represents those who have no voice. When you are told why something isn't possible, why it's more complicated than it seems, why you shouldn't say or do something, remember those who depend on you to improve their lives. Finally, the spectre of an appalling terrorist attack in Manchester, UK, hung over your election last week. But that episode, and the violence that occurs every day in every nation, held within it an important truth—that the protection and advance of human civilisation depends on inextricable linkages between peace and security, development and health. WHO is more than a health agency. It stands for the possibility of human perfection. Believe in that vision. And hold all of us accountable for delivering it.</br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-292017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)31503-9/fulltext
  
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Government has been advised not to decriminalise sex work in the very week that a special clinic for sex workers and drug users was opened in Cape Town. Charlene was eight when her mother died. She ended up in an orphanage called ‘Ons Plek’ but had to leave once she turned 18. “I had nowhere to go. I didn’t know about living on the street. A friend told me that she knew how to make a quick buck. ‘A quick buck,’ I thought. ‘OK. I know...
2017-05-292017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/29/sex-workers-remain-criminals/
  
Article

  <div>Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus Adhanom is the first African to become the director-general of the World Health Organisation (WHO). He is also the first non-physician to head up the United Nations’ body.<br><br>He has big challenges ahead of him.<br><br>He will be expected use his formidable talents – including diplomacy – to boost the WHO’s image and finances, protect it against the whimsical policies of superpowers, and keep the organisation free of commercial influences.<br><br>Dr Tedros has already prioritised improving universal health coverage. As he put it&#58;<br><br>All roads should lead to universal health coverage. I will not rest until we have met this.<br><br>To achieve this, he will need to strengthen health systems. But the challenge he faces is that the responsibility for strengthening health systems is different in different contexts, and it seldom falls directly to the WHO.<br><br>Such efforts are often driven by funders’ priorities. And for countries that don’t rely on external resources, such as China and India, investments in health systems tend to reflect domestic social sector policy and priorities.<br><br>It’s therefore worth asking&#58; what can the WHO, or more specifically the DG, do to advance the health systems agenda? Here are three ideas that could be usefully pursued to achieve the outcome the DG desires.</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-262017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/three-ideas-on-how-the-new-who-dg-can-build-health-systems-from-the-bottom-up-78412
  
Article

  <div>LIMPOPO – While the number of patients reporting to clinics and hospitals with malaria in Mopani is dropping, the provincial health department remains concerned as the battle to end the current outbreak continues.<br><br>Education and awareness campaigns are ongoing as winter sets in and temperatures drop, causing mosquitoes to die out.<br><br>The area has been hard-hit by a malaria outbreak that saw 1200 cases of malaria in April alone, with the May figure now approaching 800 cases.<br><br>Singer Yvonne Chaka Chaka, the United Nations special ambassador on malaria, recently visited the area during the Limpopo Department of Health’s malaria awareness campaign in Dzumeri village, which falls under the Greater Giyani Municipality in Mopani District.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-252017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/25/malaria-tally-2000-since-april/
  
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  <div>WHO’s budget has been problematic for years, to say the least. While voluntary contributions to the organization have been increasing, a huge bulk of it, over 80 percent, has largely been earmarked to a limited set of programs, leaving others such as the new health emergencies program to suffer from underfunding. In 2016, outgoing Director-General Margaret Chan reprioritized $130 million in funding for the program to ensure it “doesn’t go under.”<br><br>Tedros has repeatedly mentioned the need to expand the WHO’s donor base, and he reiterated this during his first press conference as the newly elected director-general on Wednesday at Palais des Nations in Geneva, where the current 70th World Health Assembly is held. WHO’s funding unit requires upsizing in terms of size and skills of human resources, he said. WHO should look into what it can learn from other United Nations agencies, such as UNICEF, on the issue of fundraising.<br><br>But he also emphasized the need to look at a “bigger envelope.”<br><br>“When we talk about budget issue, most of the time we raise the WHO budget only. But that’s not the right way of thinking about financing [the] Global Health Agenda,” he told a packed room of journalists.<br><br>WHO, he said, is the “leader of the global health agenda” and therefore should look at raising funding not just for its own programs, but also for multilateral institutions such as the World Bank, GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, and the Global Fund to Fight HIV and AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, whose programs help fill gaps in health financing and service delivery in countries.</br></br></br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-252017-06-23 12:00 AM
  
Article

  <div>Stunted kids grow into fat adults, indicative of a nutritional crisis government does not know how to address. Are there no champions for NCDs because they mostly affect women, the old and fat?<br><br>Over a quarter of South African pre-school kids are stunted, their development arrested by poor nutrition.<br><br>This early hunger will dog them as adults where, ironically, they will be prone to becoming overweight – both because poorer households survive on cheap, carbohydrate-based food and because their deprived childhoods have primed their bodies to store food as fat in preparation for famine.<br><br>As overweight adults, they will be ambushed by “lifestyle diseases” – diabetes (type 2), hypertension, strokes, heart attacks and cancer.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-222017-06-23 12:00 AM
  
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  <div>The Healthcare Access and Quality Index rates SA high on diptheria but low on TB; but developed countries, such as Norway and Australia, are not getting it right either<br><br>The number of people dying from curable illnesses is &quot;disturbing&quot;‚ a new global study has found. While significant gains have been made in the past 25 years‚ the study found &quot;massive inequity of access and quality healthcare&quot;.<br><br>The study is authored by Dr Christopher Murray‚ director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. It was published on Friday in the international medical journal‚ The Lancet.<br><br>The study says SA’s healthcare system ranks high in addressing common vaccine-preventable diseases‚ with a score of 98 out of 100 in addressing diphtheria and 95 for tetanus. However‚ in other categories the nation has much lower scores‚ such as tuberculosis (TB) and lower respiratory infections, which both score 24.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-192017-06-23 12:00 AMBusinesslivehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-19-people-still-dying-from-curable-diseases--but-sa-ranks-quite-high/
  
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  <div>KWA-ZULU NATAL – Traditional healers in KwaZulu Natal have been trained by the provincial Department of Health (DoH) to counsel, examine and test their patients impacted by HIV/Aids and TB.<br><br>This is the result of a collaboration between the Department and an NGO that works in the field of health and HIV/Aids. iTEACH – the Integration of TB and Education and Care for HIV – together with the DoH, has trained over 400 traditional healers to recognize patients who have TB and HIV symptoms.<br><br>The training, carried out at Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, now enables traditional healrs to do basic screening and confirmation tests and then refer the patient on to their nearest hospital or clinic for medical treatment.</br></br></br></br></div>
2017-05-182017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/18/kzn-traditional-healers-test-counsel-hiv-tb-patients
  
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  <div>Cosatu accuses the health minister of betraying voters by offering medical schemes a lifelineHealth Minister Aaron Motsoaledi moved on Tuesday to defend his position on National Health Insurance (NHI) after Cosatu accused him of betraying voters by offering medical schemes a lifeline.<br><br>The NHI white paper released in 2015 says a single NHI fund should be established to pay for services and relegates medical schemes to providing &quot;complementary&quot; services.<br><br>Health director-general Precious Matsoso and Motsoaledi have recently signalled a potentially softer approach, in which medical schemes would continue to exist.<br><br>At the weekend, Motsoaledi said medical schemes would need to consolidate and reduce the number of options they offered, but they would play a role in the transition to NHI.</br></br></br></br></br></br></div>
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2017-05-172017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-17-aaron-motsoaledi-deflects-attack-by-cosatu-on-national-health-scheme/
  
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Three Durban restaurateurs arrested by the Hawks, accused of selling places to study at the University of KwaZulu Natal‘s medical school for up to half a million rand a spot, have been released on bail. The expanding investigation may encompass another SA medical school.

Varsha, 44, Hitesh Bhatt, 46, and co-accused Preshni Hiraman, 54, made a brief court appearance inPinetown Magistrate’s Court. after their arrests on Friday, reports The Mercury.

The couple run a popular, internationally rated restaurant, Little Gujarat, in the Durban CBD.

The trio face charges of corruption for allegedly selling spaces at the Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine and other health science places at the university for a fee of between R250 000 and R500 000.

The racket was exposed by the Sunday Tribune.
2017-05-172017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/hawks-widen-investigation-sa-medical-school-places-sale/
  
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  <div>South Africa, along with India, Russia and the Philippines, will over the next two decades face dramatically rising rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), according to research from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).<br><br>Using data on outcomes and impacts of tuberculosis across four countries with some of the highest rates of the disease, researchers from the CDC found indications that person-to-person transmission will drive rising rates of TB that does not respond to treatments of first and second resort over the next two decades.</br></br></div>
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2017-05-172017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/cdc-modelling-study-sounds-warning-tb-sa/
  
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The City of Johannesburg is launching an emergency measles vaccination campaign following after 11 cases of the the illness have been reported in Gauteng. In South Africa, children should be vaccinated against measles at nine & 18 months The drive is set to start on Monday, and will target children between 6 months and 15 years old. The announcement was made in a statement warning residents to be cautious of a possible outbreak of measles this winter season after 11...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/15/emergency-vaccination-campaign-curb-measles-outbreak-gauteng/
  
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Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi says he will present a revised version of the National Health Insurance (NHI) white paper to a cabinet subcommittee on Tuesday. If the subcommittee approves the blueprint, it will then be considered by the Cabinet. If the Cabinet approves the plans, the legislative process to enact the policy will begin. A key aspect that will be scrutinised is the future role of SA’s medical schemes and administrators. The paper...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-15-why-the-nhi-may-take-softer-approach/
  
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The Trump administration on Monday significantly expanded a Reagan-era policy banning foreign aid to international healthcare providers who discuss abortion or advocate for abortion rights, in a move critics fear will jeopardize efforts to fight diseases such as malaria, HIV/Aids, and the Zika virus. The new terms of the ban will apply to $8.8bn in existing foreign aid provided by the state department, USAid, and the Department of Defense – dwarfing the $600m in...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/15/trump-abortion-rule-mexico-city-policy
  
Article
There is absolutely no evidence that young women are deliberately falling pregnant in order to access the child support grant, Statistician-General Pali Lehohla said on Monday as he released the findings of the South Africa Demographic and Health Survey (SADHS) 2016. The study found that the teenage pregnancy rate had remained virtually the same between 1998 and 2016 at 71 per 1,000 women. "There is a notion that grants influence young girls to produce...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-15-survey-finds-teenage-girls-do-not-get-pregnant-for-grants/
  
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One in 10 of Mpumalanga’s children under the age of two has not had any of the shots required under the government’s childhood immunisation programme, according to the South Africa Demographic Health Survey (DHMS) 2016 released on Monday by Statistics SA. The finding signals potentially deadly weaknesses in the childhood immunisation programme, as inadequate coverage of the population increases the likelihood of disease outbreaks. Both Gauteng and the Western...
2017-05-152017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Livehttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-15-one-in-10-mpumalanga-toddlers-not-immunised-data-reveal/
  
Article
Hundreds of medication errors are made in children’s wards at one of the country’s leading hospitals. Pharmacists who spent 16 weeks in the four paediatric wards at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Ga-Rankuwa‚ Gauteng‚ detected 663 medication errors — an average of 2.9 per patient. The biggest category of errors involved incorrect dosing‚ followed by omission of medication and medicine being given at the wrong time. A total of 106 errors were made...
2017-05-142017-06-23 12:00 AMBD Live https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2017-05-14-the-great-drugs-bungle-how-hospital-doctors-and-nurses-put-kids-at-risk/
  
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The Department of Health has done a U-turn on its plan to scrap medical aid schemes, saying they should work with the state when it rolls out National Health Insurance instead.   Department director-general Precious Matsoso met leaders of the medical aid plan sector and asked that they work together to reform healthcare in South Africa. "This is big news," said Graham Anderson, principal officer of Profmed.
2017-05-112017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Live http://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2017/05/11/Climbdown-on-medical-aids
  
Article
The introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been one of the great public health success stories of the past 40 years. ART has led to increased survival in people living with HIV, and subsequently to individual and societal gains worldwide, because of the marked improvements in its potency, side-effect profile, and simplicity of use.1 Results from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 study have clearly proven the efficacy of ART for prevention of transmission,...
2017-05-102017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30086-3/fulltext
  
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Embattled hospitals across the Eastern Cape – where health services have been shoddy and people reliant on state healthcare have been driven to protest action – will be receiving a welcome boost in resources. The Eastern Cape Health Department has put aside R14.4-billion to recruit medical specialists and general workers to fill vacancies in over 300 public health facilities across the province.
2017-05-102017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/10/r14-4-billion-eastern-cape-health/
  
Article
Pumpkin leaves, sweet potatoes, Hugo beans, baby black jacks and wild fruits have been rejected in favour of a more westernised diet of processed meats, fast food and oily treats leading to a host of health problems. Mkhulu Macingwane Mchunu (85) works in his garden where he grows the vegetables he believes are keeping him healthy and strong. (Credit: Sandile Ndlovu / Health-e) Durban dietician Raeesa Seedat says fruit and vegetables are high in vitamins, minerals,...
2017-05-092017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/09/heavy-impact-urban-diets/
  
Article
SA’s grandmothers are breadwinners in their old age, and their inability to access decent healthcare quickly impacts on their children, grandchildren and their entire communities. Six elderly women sit inside a corrugated iron shack in the Ngangelizwe township in Mthatha, a region with among the highest poverty rates in the Eastern Cape, to share their stories. Like many South African grandmothers, they have become, in their old age, their families’ breadwinners,...
2017-05-082017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/08/no-time-emergencies/
  
Article
A pregnant woman, who was sent home after arriving at her local clinic with severe abdominal pains, gave birth to a healthy baby girl in the street a short while later.
2017-05-032017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/03/limpopo-woman-gives-birth-street/
  
Article
Researchers have shown that monetary incentives lead to infants being immunised on time. Doreen Auma puffs as her stride shortens with every step. The humidity is thick and sticky in western Kenya’s rain season, and today there seems to be no end to the rough dirt road snaking to the Masogo Health Centre. Auma is eight months pregnant and trudging to an antenatal check-up. She already has a baby, who at 11 months old is overdue for his measles and yellow fever vaccinations at the...
2017-05-032017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-05-03-00-paying-for-change-kenya-offers-cash-to-parents-willing-to-vaccinate-babies/
  
Article
After 23 years of ‘freedom’, some health facilities are operating without the water as provincial authorities blame municipalities and municipalities drag their feet. Government healthcare facilities around the country – the only place the poorest people can go when they are sick – are often left without the most basic resource: water. Many clinics and hospitals have been left with dry taps, sometimes for several months.
2017-05-022017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/05/02/dry-facilities-indictment-democracy/
  
Article
Good rains and hot, humid conditions have fuelled a surge in malaria cases in 2017, after 2016’s drought led to a low number of cases reported to the National Institutes for Communicable Diseases (NICD). There were 9,478 cases of malaria identified in SA during the year to March 31, an almost 50% increase on the 6,375 cases reported in 2016, the NICD announced last week. Just under half the recent cases (4,328) were caused by local transmission, as weather and a suboptimal household...
2017-05-022017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-05-02-malaria-cases-rise-50-after-delays-in-spraying/
  
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Lay counsellors are being trained to assist a handful of psychiatrists to deal with the minds of Nigerians racked by Boko Haram terror Bulus Apollos is sitting in the small courtyard of a compound in Gomari Gana, an area with dusty streets in Maiduguri, Nigeria. His hands, gnarled from years of onion farming, shake as he lifts faded yellow trousers to reveal swollen feet. Apollos (47) was held captive for over a year by Boko Haram fighters, the Islamist insurgents who have waged a bloody...
2017-04-252017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-25-handful-of-psychologists-deal-with-minds-racked-by-boko-haram-terror
  
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News release 24 APRIL 2017 | GENEVA, NAIROBI - At an event on the eve of World Malaria Day in Nairobi, WHO called today for accelerated scale-up of efforts to prevent malaria and save lives. In sub-Saharan Africa, which shoulders 90% of the global malaria burden, more than 663 million cases have been averted since 2001. Insecticide-treated nets have had the greatest impact, accounting for an estimated 69% of cases prevented through control tools. Together with diagnosis and...
2017-04-242017-06-23 12:00 AMWHOhttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2017/world-malaria-day/en/
  
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JOHANNESBURG — Three African countries have been chosen to test the world’s first malaria vaccine, the World Health Organization announced Monday. Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi will begin piloting the injectable vaccine next year with hundreds of thousands of young children, who have been at highest risk of death. The vaccine, which has partial effectiveness, has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives if used with existing measures, the WHO regional director for Africa,...
2017-04-242017-06-23 12:00 AMSTAThttps://www.statnews.com/2017/04/24/african-countries-malaria-vaccine/
  
Article
A decade ago, most countries used only localised strategies. But Zambia decided to make bed nets, insecticides, and drugs available nationwide. As doctors, we have seen the devastating effect of malaria on children, families and communities. We have heartbreaking memories of patients lost to this preventable disease. But we are now witnessing a new history. On April 25, Zambia launched a national elimination strategy. We are aggressively pursuing the goal of a malaria-free country by 2021...
2017-04-242017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-25-00-comment-zambian-health-organisations-are-zambitious-about-eradicating-malaria
  
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The healthcare system is collapsing in KwaZulu-Natal as hospitals are short-staffed and filled with broken equipment. "Every day it gets worse," said the head of the KwaZulu-Natal coastal branch of the SA Medical Association, Mvuyisi Mzukwa. Mzukwa wrote a letter to the head of the SA Medical Association on behalf of the province's doctors. The Times has a copy of the letter, which warns of a growing risk in medical legal cases due to the reduced level of care at...
2017-04-182017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2017/04/18/KZN-health-in-bad-state1
  
Article
KwaZulu-Natal Health, together with an NGO called Integration of TB in Education and Care for HIV and Aids – known as I-TEACH – have embarked on a campaign to train thousands of traditional healers to conduct HIV/Aids tests on their clients. The department hopes this initiative will help slow the spread of the virus. To date, over 450 traditional healers have graduated from the programme. According to I-Teach, four in 10 people are infected with the HI...
2017-04-112017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/campaign-teach-traditional-healers-conduct-hivaids-tests/
  
Article
Could Zimbabwe's new Health Development Fund rescue the country's cash-strapped clinics and hospitals? For two years, Widna Chiyangwa from Harare, Zimbabwe, suffered in pain. She was in her mid-40s and had four children to feed. But a broken ankle had left her without an income — she could no longer work as an informal trader because she couldn’t walk. Chiyangwa required urgent surgery to fix her ankle, but she couldn’t afford it
2017-04-062017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-06-00-how-to-fund-a-failing-health-system
  
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A single daily tablet could slash your risk of HIV infection, could it be for you? More people than ever are taking the once-a-day pill to help prevent HIV infection. As of the beginning of this month, HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Tshwane are the latest to get access to Truvada, a two-in-one antiretroviral. When the pill is taken daily as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), it can reduce a person’s risk of HIV infection by between 44% and more than 90%, depending on how..
2017-04-052017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-04-05-00-the-myths-that-could-be-standing-between-you-and-the-hiv-prevention-pill-truvada
  
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The Department of Health has revealed that it cannot afford to hire its full complement of nurses and doctors, telling MPs it is short of at least R3.2-billion for the 2017-2018 financial year.   The department's director-general, Precious Matsoso, told the parliamentary standing committee on appropriations that the healthcare system had 45,733 vacant posts, and 351,925 filled posts - an 11.5% shortfall.
2017-04-042017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2017/04/04/Health-department-in-sick-bay-R3.2bn-budget-shortfall-leaves-11.5-of-jobs-unfilled
  
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An insular, nativist, authoritarian wave has been on the rise in countries around the world. These movements play on people's fears and insecurities. They create scapegoats, especially vulnerable minorities, and attempt to falsely blame these groups as the cause of people's fears. They also try to undermine institutions such as an independent media and judiciary, which are vital to maintaining the ties of accountability between the elected and the public: structures crucial to a...
2017-04-012017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(17)30102-X/fulltext
  
Article
Did the United Nation’s millennium development goals (MDGs) make any difference? Perhaps no question is more important for assessing the results of global policy cooperation between 2000 and 2015. But this is a difficult question to answer, because pathways of cause and effect are difficult to discern. In our study we examined which trajectories changed, for better or worse, and to what scale of human consequence. Here we highlight three key findings.
2017-03-302017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/mar/30/how-successful-were-the-millennium-development-goals?CMP=share_btn_tw
  
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Stumbling blocks remain to effective testing of how the National Health Insurance will work at pilot sitesTeething problems at provincial health departments, including a lack of co-ordination, poor planning and uncertainty in districts, remain stumbling blocks to the effective testing of how the National Health Insurance (NHI) will work at pilot sites. The dire state of affairs was detailed in a Financial and Fiscal Commission presentation to Parliament’s portfolio committee on...
2017-03-292017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-03-29-committee-hears-of-nhi-pilot-problems/
  
Article
South Africa has the highest estimated tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate amongst the 22 high burden countries globally, with 834 new TB cases per 100,000 population. But there is evidence that the rate of new confirmed TB cases in the country is dropping. Now an online TB Surveillance Dashboard has been developed to better track and analyse the infectious disease. TB can affect people of all age groups but is most common among adults, particularly those co-...
2017-03-292017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/world-tb-day-launch-online-tb-surveillance-dashboard/
  
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More than 190 learners in Grade 3‚ 4 and 5 fell pregnant between 2014 and 2016‚ a response to a parliamentary question has revealed. If learners from Grade 6 and 7 who fell pregnant are taken into account‚ the number jumps to 1‚449. “This information should shock every South African‚” the DA’s MP and basic education portfoli
2017-03-272017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/local/2017/03/27/In-primary-school-and-pregnant-The-shocking-numbers1
  
Article
Diagnosing TB in people who have HIV has been a challenge because they often have low levels of the bacteria in their system. This has been a serious problem for a country like South Africa where 454,000 people are infected with TB each year, half of whom are HIV positive. The Conversation Africa’s Health and Medicine Editor Candice Bailey spoke to Professor Bavesh Kana about a landmark study that provides a solution to tackling this diagnostic problem. What has the traditional...
2017-03-242017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/new-study-helps-crack-the-problem-of-diagnosing-tb-in-people-with-hiv-75121
  
Article
The emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis has resulted in scientists taking a more aggressive and urgent approach to research into the development of the disease. As the number of drug resistant TB cases has continued to rise, so has the need for rapid diagnosis, new treatment and new strategies that could help contain the disease.
2017-03-232017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/latest-transmission-patterns-for-drug-resistant-tb-pose-a-new-challenge-75010
  
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Contraception may be finally coming to a secondary school near you. South Africa is expected to release its new national HIV strategy later this month. In a country that continues to battle the world's largest HIV epidemic, the document will guide the next six years in the fight against new infections. The South African National Aids Council (Sanac), civil society groups and key government departments met to finalise the strategy late last week. The plan not only outlines the...
2017-03-212017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-21-00-three-things-we-can-expect-from-south-africaa-new-hiv-and-tb-plan
  
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This is a time of unprecedented change in medical education globally. Medical schools, postgraduate bodies and other organisations are responding to rapid advances in medicine and changes in health care delivery. New education approaches are being adopted to exchange information. This enables the institutions to produce relevant health professionals.
2017-03-212017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/kenyan-medical-students-are-learning-through-a-community-outreach-model-74382
  
Article
A doctor shortage in war-torn Mozambique paved the way for a new breed of surgeons that have slashed deaths among new mothers. In Caia, a small truck-stop town in a remote part of Mozambique’s central Sofala province, Sebastiana Domingos has just started her shift at the district hospital. She gently examines the scar on a patient’s abdomen. The 34-year-old pregnant woman was rushed to hospital after her uterus ruptured. “She was bleeding heavily and was severely...
2017-03-212017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisa http://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-21-mozambique-doctors-pass-the-scapel-to-nurses-in-the-quest-for-safer-births-c-sections
  
Article
Every month‚ Nancy (not her real name) and her business partner travel to Zimbabwe to stock up on Marvelon family planning pills. She smuggles them back into South Africa‚ where she sells them at a healthy profit to other Zimbabweans who for various reasons don’t want the contraceptive pills dispensed in South African clinics. Nancy’s suppliers are hospital staff in Zimbabwean hospitals who sell the pills to her for R5 a blister pack. Marvelon is distributed...
2017-03-202017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/africa/2017/03/20/Free-Zimbabwean-contraceptives-smuggled-for-sale-in-South-Africa
  
Article
Today, if someone is diagnosed with HIV, he or she can choose among 41 drugs that can treat the disease. And there’s a good chance that with the right combination, given at the right time, the drugs can keep HIV levels so low that the person never gets sick.
2017-03-192017-06-23 12:00 AMTimehttp://time.com/4705809/first-aids-drug-azt/
  
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by Mogale Mojela on March 14, 2017 Patients who are badly treated at Limpopo hospitals are failing to report negligence or misconduct, prompting the Health Professions Council of South Africa to launch an awareness campaign to inform people of their rights, Mogale Mojela writes.
2017-03-142017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/03/14/hpcsa-urges-residents-report-misconduct/
  
Article
Kerry Cullinan on March 13, 2017 This killer preys on older, overweight and obese women – mainly from poor communities. It has been moving stealthily through the population, its influence under-estimated as our attention has been focused on HIV and tuberculosis.
2017-03-132017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/03/13/theres-new-killer-town/
  
Article
A deal brokered with the health department guarantees free access but for how long? Drugmaker Otsuka Pharmaceutical won’t charge South Africa for using its new tuberculosis (TB) drug in a pilot programme, but South Africa’s free deal is unlikely to last. The drug, delamanid, is one of the first new TB medicines to be developed in 50 years. In unpublished research by international humanitarian organisation  Doctors Without Borders (MSF) delamanid has been shown...
2017-03-082017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-08-00-drug-maker-otsuka-to-provide-new-wonder-tb-drug-delamanid-to-south-africa-for-free
  
Article
Gauteng finance MEC Barbara Creecy on Tuesday tabled a R108bn budget for the province, which included R10bn added to the baseline of departments to meet increased demand. Gauteng is the largest contributor to the country’s economy and accounts for 35% of SA's gross domestic product (GDP). The main priorities for the provincial government were education, health and infrastructure. The largest amount - R40.8bn - was allocated to the education...
2017-03-072017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttp://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2017-03-07-gauteng-increases-mental-health-spending-after-esidimeni-crisis/
  
Article
SA’s Phelophepa train draws a crowd wherever it goes. The sound of the lumbering 19-car clinic-on-rails signals the arrival of badly needed free healthcare for thousands of South Africans as it tours the country. "When you arrive, people are always ready, there will be kids performing," said train manager Anna Mokwena, a nurse. At a stop this week in Pienaarsrivier, a town in Limpopo, dozens of elderly patients alongside women clutching...
2017-03-072017-06-23 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttp://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-03-07-full-steam-ahead-for-sas-clinic-on-rails/
  
Article
Once slices of the healthcare funding pie are dished out to provinces, there is little control over how this money is spent to benefit the rural poor. In Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s budget speech in last week, he touted the type of inclusive economic growth and radical transformation that is long overdue in South Africa. Each year, the minister’s speech outlines the broad brushstrokes of the country’s economic policy. From there, money flows from the...
2017-03-022017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-03-02-00-radical-transformation-begins-with-fixing-how-we-fund-healthcare-in-remote-areas/
  
Article
Statistics South Africa has released its exhaustive analysis of mortality and causes of death in 2015, noting a 3% decline to 460,236 deaths. The three leading causes were tuberculosis, diabetes and cerebrovascular disease. Key findings summary:
2017-03-012017-06-23 12:00 AMMedical Briefhttp://www.medicalbrief.co.za/archives/stats-sa-reports-slight-decline-deaths/
  
Article
There has been a significant increase in deaths from diabetes, which is now South Africa’s second biggest killer. Diabetes is the number one killer of women and people living in the Western Cape. This is according to StatsSA, which yesterday (28 Feb) released a report on the causes of death in 2015. Tuberculosis remains the country’s biggest single killer, claiming 7,2% of all deaths followed by diabetes, which was responsible for 5,4% of deaths. In 2013,...
2017-03-012017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://www.health-e.org.za/2017/03/01/big-increase-diabetes-deaths/
  
Article
Epidemiological assessment of geographical heterogeneity of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) is necessary to inform HIV prevention and care strategies in the more generalised HIV epidemics across sub-Saharan Africa, including Malawi. We aimed to measure the HIV prevalence, risks, and access to HIV care among MSM across multiple localities to better inform HIV programming for MSM in Malawi.
2017-02-272017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Lancethttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanhiv/article/PIIS2352-3018(17)30042-5/fulltext
  
Article
Scientists are embarking on a massive clinical trial to test a drug to reduce the chances of people living with HIV developing heart diseases and suffering from heart-related illnesses like strokes. The trial is being launched in South Africa but will span four ccntinents and involve 6,500 participants. The Conversation Africa’s health and medicine editor Candice Bailey asked Carl Dieffenbach and Gita Ramjee to explain the significance of the trial. How common is it for...
2017-02-272017-06-23 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/south-africa-launches-clinical-trial-to-cut-heart-disease-in-hiv-positive-people-73625
  
Article
Social injustice is the biggest threat to global health and a radical change in society is needed if we really want people to live long, healthy lives. “What good does it do to treat people and send them back to the conditions that made them sick?” This is the question Sir Michael Marmot, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London, asks himself repeatedly. An expert in health and inequality, he spoke at Wits University recently about why...
2017-02-272017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/27/inequality-gap-impact-health/
  
Article
A mobile app in Senegal helps families save money and reduce waste through a "virtual pharmacy" where users can exchange leftover medication for new prescriptions. JokkoSante is scaling up after a two-year pilot phase in one Senegalese town and on Friday launched a partnership with its first hospital, said founder Adama Kane. It aims to reach 300,000 families in the West African nation by the end of the year. "Everyone has a box of unused medicine in their cabinet,...
2017-02-242017-06-23 12:00 AMTimes Livehttp://www.timeslive.co.za/scitech/2017/02/24/African-app-cuts-medical-costs-with-community-virtual-pharmacy
  
Article
The Finance Minister announced that a NHI Fund will be set up this year in the next step towards universal health coverage. A National Health Insurance (NHI) Fund will help mentally ill patients among others, announced Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan in his 2017 budget speech. The initial priorities of the Fund include maternal health, family planning services, the integrated school health programme and improving the services for people with disabilities, the elderly and “...
2017-02-232017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-E Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/23/gordhan-outlines-initial-focus-nhi/
  
Article
Without accurate data, maginalised groups risk being left behind - again. Tanzania’s most recent national census tells us that about one in 16 people has a disability in the country’s Ruvuma region. But what if the true number was closer to one in five? Data is not just for analysts. When properly used, statistics can make a real difference to people’s lives. They can decide, for instance, where services such as hospitals, schools and voting stations are...
2017-02-222017-06-23 12:00 AMBhekisisahttp://bhekisisa.org/article/2017-02-22-00-miscounted-how-the-world-has-got-disability-figures-wrong
  
Article
The National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union (Nehawu) has accused top executives at the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) of corruption and maladministration, prompting the organisation’s board to commission a forensic audit. The investigation, conducted by Grant Thornton, is complete and its recommendations are due to be discussed at a two-day board meeting that begins on Wednesday. Among the NHLS executives fingered by Nehawu are CEO Joyce Mogale, chief...
2017-02-222017-06-23 12:00 AMBD LiveHttp://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2017-02-22-national-health-laboratory-service-heads-accused-of-graft/
  
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CATEGORY: HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB DATE: 21 February 2017 Press statement For immediate release Sixty thousand participants will take part in the fifth National HIV and Health Study The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) will visit 60 000 South Africans to request their participation in the country’s fifth HIV and Health study. Professor Leickness Simbayi, Deputy CEO for Research at the HSRC and overall Principal Investigator of the study, says field workers will be...
2017-02-212017-06-23 12:00 AMHuman Sciences Research Councilhttp://www.hsrc.ac.za/en/media-briefs/hiv-aids-stis-and-tb/sabsmm-feb-2017
  
Article
Chairing a session on HIV self-testing at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle this week, Joanne Stekler said that much is alread
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMAidsmaphttp://www.aidsmap.com/How-should-HIV-self-testing-services-be-provided/page/3118526/
  
Article
Late last month, Heads of State and governments from across the continent gathered in Addis Ababa for the 28th African Union (AU) Summit writes Yolanda Moyo of PATH South Africa. Leaders and policymakers discussed a wide range of issues, but one common thread ran through the meeting—the need to “strengthen the spirit of pan-Africanism and unity” to achieve shared goals.
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/17/no-delays-accelerating-access-medicine/
  
Article
HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) appears to be nearly 100% effective if taken
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMAidsmaphttp://www.aidsmap.com/page/3118230/
  
Article
New analysis of data detailing the extent of sexual violence in the Rustenburg area indicates that one in five HIV infections (approximately 6,765 of all female cases) and one in three cases of depression among women (5,022 cases) are attributable to rape and intimate-partner violence (IPV), while one in three women inducing abortion (1,296 cases) was pregnant as a result of sexual violence.
2017-02-172017-06-23 12:00 AMMSFhttps://www.msf.org.za/stories-news/press-releases/south-africa-sexual-violence-platinum-mining-belt-major-driver-hiv
  
Article
Usually a death sentence, extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) can potentially be cured with a new drug combination. Interim results from the Nix-TB trial, which were presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle, are extremely promising and point to new hope for people diagnosed with XDR-TB.
2017-02-162017-06-23 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://www.health-e.org.za/2017/02/16/deadliest-form-tb-potential-cure-last/
  
Article
Providing immune cell testing and HIV treatment counseling immediately after a positive HIV test was the first in a series of measures that increased rapid linkage to care and retention at ten clinic sites in  Mozambique, data presented here Thursday showed. Measures in a randomized trial of interventions in Maputo and Inhambane Province also included accelerated access to antiretroviral treatment and text message appointment reminders. Findings from the trial were presented by...
2017-02-162017-06-23 12:00 AMSciences Speak Bloghttp://sciencespeaksblog.org/2017/02/16/croi-2017-efforts-to-improve-linkage-and-adherence-to-hiv-care-in-mozambique-and-south-africa-yield-results/
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