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At the end of 2021, 57-year old David Bennett Sr. was bedridden and on life-support with irreversible heart failure. He was not eligible for a human heart transplant or an implanted mechanical heart pump because of his underlying health condition and, allegedly, "a history of disregarding medical advice." Certain death was on the horizon and this fatal prognosis made Bennett a candidate for a highly experimental and never-before-attempted surgical procedure involving the transplantation of a heart from a genetically modified pig. The pig-to-human cardiac transplant—or xenotransplant—was authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on compassionate grounds on New Year's Eve 2021 and the surgery was performed on Jan. 7, 2022.
2022-05-112022-05-13 12:00 AMMedical Xpresshttps://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-05-pig-human-transplants-misguided-shortage.html
  
Article
Asthma is an inflammatory respiratory condition of the airways and affects about 262-million people globally. In South Africa, more than 20% of children and 10-15% of adults have asthma. For those living with the illness it can reduce quality of life in varying degrees and it's not uncommon to be hospitalised during an attack. In 2019 alone, 461 000 people succumbed to the illness. This despite the fact that there are evidenced-based medications to treat the condition. Clearly fundamental changes are needed to reduce avoidable asthma deaths and the new global GINA* treatment guidelines are expected to do just that. Read on to learn more from Johannesburg-based GP, Dr Marlin McKay who shares what has to be done to achieve better control and explains the new treatment strategies that are being followed to reduce risks and attacks.
2022-05-112022-05-13 12:00 AMHealth24 https://www.news24.com/health24/medical/asthma/from-our-sponsors/too-many-people-still-die-from-asthma-doctor-weighs-in-on-the-new-way-forward-and-how-its-reducing-risks-20220511
  
Article
A new report from the World Health Organization highlights the increasing use of sophisticated online marketing techniques for alcohol and the need for more effective regulation. It shows that young people and heavy drinkers are increasingly targeted by alcohol advertising, often to the detriment of their health. Reducing the harm from alcohol – by regulating cross-border alcohol marketing, advertising and promotion is the first report from WHO to detail the full extent of the way that alcohol is today being marketed across national borders – often by digital means – and in many cases regardless of the social, economic or cultural environment in receiving countries. Worldwide, 3 million people die each year as a result of harmful use of alcohol – one every 10 seconds – representing about 5% of all deaths. A disproportionate number of these alcohol--related deaths occur among younger people, with 13.5% of all deaths among those who are 20–39 years of age being alcohol-related.
2022-05-102022-05-13 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/10-05-2022-who-highlights-glaring-gaps-in-regulation-of-alcohol-marketing-across-borders
  
Article
The number of newborn babies dying from neonatal sepsis is rising as the antibiotics used to treat them are not working effectively, a landmark international study has found. Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening bloodstream infection that affects up to three million babies a year globally. The Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP) and partners recently released their findings showing that antibiotic resistance to bacterial infections, and the increased use of broader-spectrum antibiotics have led to high levels of mortality and neurodevelopmental problems in surviving babies. Babies are especially vulnerable to infections because of their underdeveloped immune systems, says Sally Ellis, Children’s Antibiotics Project Leader for GARDP. “Compounding the problem is that babies are dying because of the lack of good treatment options.”
2022-05-092022-05-13 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/05/09/in-depth-risk-to-newborns-increasing-as-antibiotics-stop-working/
  
Article
Abig-guns walkabout announced the reopening of the casualty unit at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) on Monday. Health Minister Dr Joe Phaahla, with a senior-level entourage from the national government and Gauteng provincial government, announced this “key milestone” reopening, but he also said the hospital’s critical trauma and emergency unit remained closed to “walk-in” emergency patients.
2022-05-092022-05-13 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-05-09-charlotte-maxeke-hospital-casualty-unit-open-but-not-for-walk-in-emergencies/
  
Article
People living in rural and remote British Columbia (BC) in Canada experience complex barriers to care, resulting in poorer health outcomes compared to their urban counterparts. Virtual healthcare (VH) can act as a tool to address some of the care barriers, including reducing travel time, cost, and disruptions to people’s lives. Conversely, VH can exacerbate inequities through unique difficulties in rural implementation, such as a lack of access to necessary infrastructure (eg internet), social supports, and technological capacity (eg devices and literacy).
2022-05-092022-05-13 12:00 AMRural and Remote Healthhttps://www.rrh.org.au/journal/article/7252
  
Article
UNAIDS warmly congratulates John Nkengasong on confirmation by the U.S. Senate as Ambassador-at-Large and Coordinator of United States Government Activities to Combat HIV/AIDS Globally. As the new U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, Dr Nkengasong will lead the United States’ President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). “This is great news for the world. John Nkengasong is an inspired choice to lead PEPFAR,” said Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS. “He is one of the world’s leading experts on HIV and pandemic preparedness and has practical experience on how to advance efforts to end AIDS amidst the COVID pandemic. We need the kind of bold thinking and commitment that he has brought throughout his career. It will be a true honour to work with him in his new role, supporting continued United States leadership on HIV, and strengthening the life-saving partnership between the UNAIDS Joint Programme and PEPFAR.” An HIV virologist with more than three decades of experience in the global HIV response, Dr Nkengasong’s work on COVID-19 in his most recent highly acclaimed role as the founding director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has been internationally recognized.
2022-05-062022-05-13 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/may/20220506_Nkengasong_pepfar
  
Article
There is good reason to be sceptical about the link between healthcare policy and implementation in South Africa. Policies such as those on mental health and palliative care, for example, may be good on paper but have generally gone unimplemented. The Competition Commission’s Health Market Inquiry is arguably one of the most impressive and thorough investigations into a set of healthcare issues in recent years but most of the HMI report’s recommendations are gathering dust. When it comes to HIV and TB there is also a disconnect but of a different type. Government is clearly doing a lot of work on HIV and TB – some very good, some less so. On the whole, though, decisions appear to be made in parallel with, rather than guided by the relevant policies.
2022-05-052022-05-13 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/05/05/editorial-how-do-we-make-an-hiv-and-tb-plan-that-has-greater-impact/
  
Article
The past 20 years have seen a significant decline in maternal mortality rates from 342 deaths to 211 per 100,000 globally. But every day, more than 800 women around the world die from complications of pregnancy and childbirth, up to 42 days after delivery. Most of these deaths are preventable. For every maternal death, another 20 women suffer serious injuries, infections and disabilities related to pregnancy. Professors Salome Maswime and Lawrence Chauke explain the state of maternal health in South Africa and how it can be improved.
2022-05-042022-05-06 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/most-maternal-deaths-are-preventable-how-to-improve-outcomes-in-south-africa-181282
  
Article
At Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital in Soweto – Africa’s largest healthcare facility with around 3 400 beds and 6 760 staff – newly graduated Dr Leago Sebesho is learning on her feet, in gruelling shifts that sometimes last up to 28 hours. From an early age, Sebesho wanted to become a doctor like her mother, who is a medical officer in family medicine. She says a medical officer is like a ‘GP’ who works in the public sector. Originally from Atteridgeville in Pretoria, Sebesho says she worked relentlessly while attending Marist Brothers Linmeyer High School in the south of Johannesburg, to get good grades so that she could get into medical school.
2022-05-042022-05-06 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/05/04/interview-i-love-science-i-love-people-says-award-winning-young-doctor/
  
Article
Pranaiya Oulapathorn was a happy new mother until she began struggling with postpartum depression. Her husband Hamish Magoffin recounts his wife's struggle that led to her tragic death. To get support or learn more about postpartum depression, visit Postpartum Support.
2022-05-032022-05-06 12:00 AMCNNhttps://edition.cnan.com/videos/world/2022/05/03/postpartum-depression-wife-death-as-equals-lon-orig.cnn/video/playlists/top-news-videos/
  
Article
Men and boys are less likely to test for HIV, to initiate antiretroviral therapy and to remain engaged in care, and are therefore dying of AIDS-related illnesses and many other diseases at disproportionately higher rates than their female counterparts. This has become increasingly clear over the past decade. Globally, antiretroviral therapy coverage of men lags that of women. In many countries in eastern and southern Africa, the region with the highest HIV burden, more than half of men aged 24–35 years living with HIV are unaware of their status and therefore not on treatment. This imperils their own health and increases the risk of HIV transmission. The diagnosis of undiagnosed men is essential for promoting men’s health and breaking the cycle of HIV transmission. Primary health-care services in eastern and southern Africa place a great deal of focus on women of reproductive age, and reproductive, maternal and child health services offer ideal entry points for HIV services—similar entry points for men are not commonplace. The architecture of health service delivery needs to be reviewed. Are health institutions organized in ways that promote access to services for men and boys?  Do HIV-related health systems, policies and strategies include men, especially men at higher risk of HIV? However, health-system barriers go beyond the service delivery level, and a broader supportive enabling environment needs to be created, including laws, policies and health strategies.
2022-04-072022-04-13 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/april/20220407_new-framework-male-engagement-eastern-southern-africa
  
Article
Two hundred years ago, drinking water from a water pump could have been lethal. The water might have appeared clean but could be contaminated with sewage, causing a serious and often deadly diarrhoeal disease owing to cholera. Luckily, societal norms and regulations around water and sanitation have shifted. We now expect the water from our taps to be clean and safe. Although we now have safer drinking water, we have a challenge ahead to do the same for the indoor air that we breathe and share. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on tuberculosis (TB) care in South Africa and globally, with TB-related deaths increasing for the first time in a decade. However, since COVID-19 and TB are both airborne infections, the attention surrounding mitigation measures could provide a glimmer of hope for the TB response.
2022-04-072022-04-13 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/04/07/opinion-time-to-take-clean-indoor-air-as-seriously-as-we-take-clean-water/
  
Article
The war in Ukraine has resulted in a catastrophic humanitarian crisis with rapidly growing numbers of deaths and casualties, the destruction of entire cities and towns and unconscionable attacks on health facilities and other civilian targets. This is putting Ukrainians living with HIV in grave danger. “It is becoming increasingly difficult for people to access the health care they need, including services for HIV,” said Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS. “UNAIDS estimates that 260 000 people were living with HIV in Ukraine before the war broke out, 152 000 of whom were taking daily medication for HIV. There is no cure for HIV. Without access to antiretroviral medicines people living with HIV will die.” The World Health Organization estimates that there have been 82 separate attacks on hospitals, ambulances and doctors in Ukraine since the war began, killing 72 and injuring at least 43 people. Nearly 50% of Ukraine’s pharmacies are presumed to be closed and many health workers are either displaced or unable to work. UNAIDS with its cosponsors WHO and UNICEF together with USAID, PEPFAR, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria are working to ensure a 12-month supply of the medicines for people living with HIV in Ukraine. A delivery of 209 000, 90-day supplies of antiretroviral medicines has arrived in Lviv, Ukraine ready to be distributed to people in need. However, distribution within Ukraine is set to be a challenge, particularly in conflict areas. UNAIDS urges respect for and protection of humanitarian corridors to allow for the distribution of humanitarian aid and safe passage for civilians to safety.
2022-04-062022-04-13 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/april/20220405_ukraine
  
Article
The 2021 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS: Ending Inequalities and Getting on Track to End AIDS by 2030 reaffirmed the importance of leadership by young people in the HIV response. The Global Network of Young People Living with HIV (Y+ Global) and the PACT are two innovative networks led by young people that have consistently proved the innovation and resourcefulness of young people in the HIV response. With support from UNAIDS, they are currently rolling out the #UPROOT Scorecard 2.0, a monitoring tool led by young people, in seven countries: Burundi, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, the Philippines, Uganda, Viet Nam and Zimbabwe.
2022-04-062022-04-13 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/april/20220406_young-people
  
Article
On this World Health Day (April 7, 2022), WHO is issuing an urgent call for accelerated action by leaders and all people to preserve and protect health and mitigate the climate crisis as part of an “Our planet, our health” campaign marking the organization’s founding day, which falls at a time of heightened conflict and fragility. In issuing its call-to-action, WHO notes that 99 per cent of people breathe unhealthy air mainly resulting from burning of fossil fuels. A heating world is seeing mosquitos spread diseases further and faster than ever before. Extreme weather events, biodiversity loss, land degradation and water scarcity are displacing people and affecting their health. Pollution and plastics are found at the bottom of our deepest oceans, the highest mountains, and have made their way into our food chain and blood stream. Systems that produce highly processed, unhealthy foods and beverages are driving a wave of obesity, increasing cancer and heart disease while generating up to one-third of global greenhouse gas emissions. This health and social crisis is compromising people’s ability to take control over their health and lives. 
2022-04-062022-04-13 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/06-04-2022-who-urges-accelerated-action-to-protect-human-health-and-combat-the-climate-crisis-at-a-time-of-heightened-conflict-and-fragility
  
Article
The large-scale contamination of the public sphere by rumours, hate speech, dangerous conspiracy theories and orchestrated deception campaigns is causing widespread concern around the world. These ills are collectively referred to as “information disorder”. The disorder results from a range of factors. They include a rapidly changing media ecology and an increasingly fractious, populist and polarised political environment. The surge in misleading and false information about the Covid-19 pandemic has increased these concerns.
2022-04-062022-04-13 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/lessons-from-the-global-south-on-how-to-counter-harmful-information-180686
  
Article
Many South African households are unable to feed their children nutritious food which has seen a rise in the number of kids living with obesity or stunted growth. Angelika Grimbeek, Nutrition Programme Manager at HEALA, said malnutrition and the availability of ultra-processed foods (UPFs) are behind the increasing rates. “There is inequality and poverty that do not allow children to access adequate amounts of nutritious food. Shockingly, 30% of South African children live in households living below the food poverty line,” said Grimbeek.
2022-04-062022-04-13 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/04/06/obesity-stunting-on-the-rise-among-sas-children/
  
Article
The primary aim of any health system must be to improve people’s health. Universal access to healthcare is recognised globally as a public good. It embodies universal social values such as solidarity, fairness, social justice, and shared responsibility. It is entrenched as a fundamental human right in the International Covenant of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). Furthermore, Section 27 in our Bill of Rights guarantees access to healthcare as a human right. There has recently been a subtle and little-noticed shift in the discourse around universal health care towards framing it as Universal Health Coverage, including in the language of documents from the United Nations (UN) and the World Health Organization (WHO).
2022-04-052022-04-13 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/04/05/opinion-reframing-the-right-to-healthcare-in-terms-of-insurance-cover-is-a-bad-idea/
  
Article
Global greenhouse emissions need to peak before 2025, at the latest, and decline by 43% by 2030 if the goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C is to be achieved, warned the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Sixth Assessment  report on Climate Change Mitigation (AR 6) launched on Monday. More aggressive investments to replace fossil fuels with renewable energy, along with zero emissions buildings; more compact, walkable cities; and massive reforestation projects are key to achieving the needed changes, the report states. This along with a stronger emphasis on sector-based emission targets and carbon taxes, the experts stated, etching a way forward for how such changes could actually be accomplished. But without immediate and deep reductions, limiting global warming will be beyond reach, states the report, authored by some 278 scientists from 65 countries. 
2022-04-042022-04-13 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/climate-mitigation-report/
  
Article
Almost the entire global population (99%) breathes air that exceeds WHO air quality limits, and threatens their health.  A record number of over 6000 cities in 117 countries are now monitoring air quality, but the people living in them are still breathing unhealthy levels of fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide, with people in low and middle-income countries suffering the highest exposures. The findings have prompted the World Health Organization to highlight the importance of curbing fossil fuel use and taking other tangible steps to reduce air pollution levels.
2022-04-042022-04-13 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/04-04-2022-billions-of-people-still-breathe-unhealthy-air-new-who-data
  
Article
Who needs a pill or an injection that can prevent them from contracting HIV through sex the most? Those countries and parts of society with the most new HIV infections, because new infections among HIV-negative people are what such biomedical interventions (treatments and devices that make it harder for the virus to be transmitted) try to stop. In the case of HIV, countries in sub-Saharan Africa have the highest HIV infection rates, particularly among African teen girls and young women. And around the world female sex workers and men who have sex with men contract HIV at considerably higher rates than non-sex workers and heterosexual men.
2022-03-302022-04-01 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/article/2022-03-30-what-is-the-use-of-anti-hiv-injections-when-those-who-need-it-most-cant-use-it/
  
Article
People often joke about the weather being bipolar, without realising how offensive and hurtful this can be. This is why the world observes World Bipolar Day on 30 March – Vincent van Gogh's birthday. The brilliant painter was posthumously diagnosed as having Bipolar Disorder. Bipolar Disorder was also previously called Manic Depression, but this term has not been in use medically in a long time. World Bipolar Day was initially an initiative by the International Society of Bipolar Disorder (ISBD), partnering with the International Bipolar Foundation (IBPF) and the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder. The National Today contains the complete history of the initiative. Bipolar Disorder is not well understood and has a lot of stigma surrounding it, and World Bipolar Day is meant to break the stigma, educate and help people to understand this condition.
2022-03-302022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=112
  
Article
“Young people here don’t regularly access HIV services. I really want to invite my friends to get tested, but they are all so afraid. They don’t have enough information or support from their families and are scared about finding out their status,” said Andika Bayu Aji, a young person from West Papua, Indonesia. The HIV epidemic among young people in Asia and the Pacific has largely been overlooked, even though about a quarter of new HIV infections in the region are among people aged 15–24 years. The vast majority of young people affected by HIV in the region are members of vulnerable populations—people living with HIV, gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, sex workers and people who inject drugs. Like many countries in the region, Indonesia’s HIV infections among young people, which make up almost half of new infections, are attributed to stigma and discrimination, poor educational awareness of HIV, lack of youth-friendly services and social taboos.
2022-03-302022-04-01 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/march/20220330_indonesia-hiv-services-young-key-populations
  
Article
In every region of the world, there are key populations who are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection. One of the key populations is transgender women, who are at 34 times greater risk of acquiring HIV than other adults. Discrimination, abuse, harassment and violence are distressingly common experiences for transgender people. They often face, from a young age, stigma, discrimination and social rejection in their homes and communities for expressing their gender identity. Such discrimination, violence and criminalization prevent transgender people from getting the HIV services they need to stay healthy. Transgender women who also are involved in sex work are even more likely to be subjected to such treatment, as shown in a study from the Dominican Republic.
2022-03-292022-04-01 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/march/20220329_transgender-sex-workers-face-frequent-abuse
  
Article
In a decision widely welcomed by civil society organisations, the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) recently approved the use of the monthly dapivirine vaginal ring for women 18 years and older to reduce the risk of HIV infection. South Africa is one of the first countries on the continent to approve the ring, which is already recommended as an additional HIV prevention option by the World Health Organization. Other proven HIV prevention methods include the use of male and female condoms, HIV prevention pills, voluntary medical male circumcision, and a monthly HIV prevention injection (called long-acting cabotegravir or CAB LA).
2022-03-292022-04-01 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/29/hiv-prevention-ring-approved-but-next-steps-unclear/
  
Article
Africa has made progress in the fight against tuberculosis (TB) in recent years, however several hurdles are curbing the efforts to end this preventable and curable disease and at the current pace, the global targets to eliminate the disease by 2030 look increasingly elusive. Dr Norbert Ndjeka, Chief Director of TB Control and Management in South Africa’s National Department of health, assesses the challenges and how to accelerate progress.
2022-03-292022-04-01 12:00 AMWHO Africahttps://www.afro.who.int/news/what-impeding-africas-tb-fight
  
Article
The Health Systems Trust commemorated World TB Day, 24 March 2022, at a multisectoral event hosted by the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Office of the Premier at KwaMteyi Clinic in Mhlumayo, a remote community situated in the province's uThukela District. This was the official Provincial event, although many other events were held across the province and HST teams participated in all supported districts, providing services for community mobilisation, screening for TB, HIV testing and treatment initiation. The event in uThukela highlighted the marked impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) on communities, where this host community alone has lost 115 of its residents to TB since January 2022.
2022-03-282022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=111
  
Article
In South Africa, tobacco companies big and small use all sorts of schemes to dodge the taxman. Our reporter, Joan van Dyk, got the details of exactly how these scams work from Johann van Loggerenberg, a former executive at the South African Revenue Service. “Sin spies”, “travelex spies”, “fixers” and their impact on South African society are all documented in Van Loggerenberg’s 2019 book Tobacco Wars, along with other types of bad actors in industry, law enforcement, and the legal fraternity. This type of fraud has a human impact as well: Van Loggerenberg was the target of an organised smear campaign, and his family was spied on.
2022-03-252022-04-01 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/multimedia/2022-03-25-podcast-the-illegal-cigarette-business-how-does-it-work/
  
Article
The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Government of India today signed an agreement to establish the WHO Global Centre for Traditional Medicine. This global knowledge centre for traditional medicine, supported by an investment of USD 250 million from the Government of India, aims to harness the potential of traditional medicine from across the world through modern science and technology to improve the health of people and the planet. Around 80% of the world’s population is estimated to use traditional medicine. To date, 170 of the 194 WHO Member States have reported the use of traditional medicine, and their governments have asked for WHO’s support in creating a body of reliable evidence and data on traditional medicine practices and products.
2022-03-252022-04-01 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/25-03-2022-who-establishes-the-global-centre-for-traditional-medicine-in-india
  
Article
An expert believes that South Africa’s low rate of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) will remain a concern until new mothers are offered more support and education. Katinka Lategan, a certified lactation consultant, said mothers face several challenges because they are not educated enough and usually don’t get assistance.  “In general, I don’t think there’s enough support and education for moms that are breastfeeding. So very often, they experience challenges in the beginning, and they don’t get enough assistance to rectify those problems,” she said. Lategan added: “If these challenges aren’t addressed, other problems may develop. For instance, low milk production, because the baby is not effectively removing milk. Or maybe, they are returning to work and the employer or the work setup doesn’t allow sufficient time for pumping.”
2022-03-252022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/25/exclusive-breastfeeding-new-moms-in-dire-need-of-support-education/
  
Article
Inadequate investment and funding for tuberculosis (TB) control in Africa is jeopardizing the efforts to meet the global target of ending the disease by 2030, while the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to roll back progress made so far in the continent, an assessment by World Health Organization (WHO) finds. Every year the African region requires at least US$ 1.3 billion for TB prevention and treatment. However, countries contribute 22% of the needed budget while external funding accounts for 34%. The rest of the budget remains unfunded, seriously undermining the efforts to eliminate the disease. This year, World TB Day is being marked under the theme “Invest to end TB. Save Lives.” Underfunding for TB programmes has a significant impact on disease detection, for example.
2022-03-242022-03-25 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.afro.who.int/news/low-funding-covid-19-curtail-tuberculosis-fight-africa
  
Article
ave you been impacted or affected by TB? Today marks world TB day which is commemorated annually to raise awareness around the disease and aimed at strengthen efforts to prevent its spread. Bongani Bingwa chats to the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) South Africa director Professor Yogan Pillay to give more insight on the day.
2022-03-242022-03-25 12:00 AM702https://www.702.co.za/articles/441529/world-tb-day-we-must-invest-in-vaccine-and-getting-shorter-duration-treatment
  
Article
In February 2021, findings from South Africa’s first National Tuberculosis Prevalence Survey were made public after delays of about a year. The survey confirmed something that has been suspected for some time – that large numbers of people who fall ill with TB in South Africa are not being diagnosed. This is firstly harmful to the health of the people who are not being diagnosed, but it is also a major obstacle to reducing the rate of new infections in the country since people who are not diagnosed and not on treatment remain infectious for much longer. According to Dr Norbert Ndjeka, Director of Drug-Resistant TB, TB, and HIV in the National Department of Health, just over 208 000 cases of TB were diagnosed in South Africa in 2020.
2022-03-242022-03-25 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/24/analysis-is-sa-on-course-to-solve-its-tb-diagnosis-problem/
  
Article
Dr Jennifer Furin has fought drug-resistant tuberculosis since 1995, when she worked as a student in a poverty-stricken suburb in Lima, Peru. Since then, she has roamed the world, treating TB and HIV patients in under-resourced countries, including Haiti, Russia, Tajikistan, Bangladesh, eSwatini, Lesotho, and South Africa. Treating drug-resistant forms of TB, she has been at the forefront of advocacy efforts to replace hearing loss-causing injections (for example, kanamycin) with a new and better drug called bedaquiline that is taken in pill form. Speaking to Spotlight this month, she lauded South Africa as a “global beacon of hope” for mostly eliminating the use of such injections.
2022-03-242022-03-25 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/health24/medical/tuberculosis/profile-i-view-the-doctor-patient-relationship-as-sacred-says-leading-tb-doctor-20220323
  
Article
The World Health Organisation (WHO) reports that in 2020 the number of TB deaths reached levels last seen in 2017 despite the number of cases falling by 1.3-million between 2019 and 2020. This, they say, means that the world is unlikely to reach its targets of reducing TB infections by 20% or ending TB deaths by 2030.
2022-03-242022-03-25 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/article/2022-03-24-tackling-tb-three-lessons-the-covid-19-pandemic-taught-us/
  
Article
The period covered by South Africa’s National Strategic Plan (NSP) for HIV, TB, and STIs 2017 – 2022 will soon come to an end and a new NSP will have to be developed for the next five years. Against the backdrop of World TB Day (24 March), Spotlight asked several local TB experts what they think should be the tuberculosis (TB) priorities in the new plan. The plan is being developed in the context of a COVID-19 pandemic that has severely impacted the TB response in South Africa and elsewhere. In South Africa, the impact was particularly clear in a reduction in TB diagnoses in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. While TB catch-up plans are in place, it is unclear to what extent those plans are currently being implemented and succeeding.
2022-03-242022-03-25 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/24/what-should-the-tb-priorities-be-in-the-new-nsp/
  
Article
Tuberculosis (TB) is a curable disease. Yet deaths are up – for the first time in a decade – despite cases being down. Why? Because the coronavirus threw a spanner in the works. The World Health Organisation (WHO) reports that in 2020 the number of TB deaths reached levels last seen in 2017 despite the number of cases falling by 1.3-million between 2019 and 2020. This, they say, means that the world is unlikely to reach its targets of reducing TB infections by 20% or ending TB deaths by 2030. The situation is yet more collateral damage from a pandemic we were unprepared for, seeing countries enforcing strict lockdowns and healthcare resources being diverted from established public healthcare programmes to urgently fight a new disease, which left many people unable to access TB testing or treatment.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/article/2022-03-24-tackling-tb-three-lessons-the-covid-19-pandemic-taught-us/
  
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People with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on regular treatment are now experiencing similar life expectancy to people without the virus. This is thanks to the innovation of antiretroviral therapy which can prevent the progression to AIDS. This is the late stage of HIV infection that occurs when the body’s immune system is badly damaged because of the virus. Evidence shows that the survival period for HIV patients who progress to AIDS is usually less than two years in untreated patients. If patients do not have access to ART, the prognosis is poor, with an overall mortality rate of more than 90%. A key factor that limits access to antiretroviral therapy is conflict or war. For this reason, we are deeply concerned about people living with HIV in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, an area that’s been the focus of our work. Currently, there’s a conflict between Ethiopia’s central government and the regional Tigrayan government.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/left-to-die-the-fate-of-thousands-of-people-living-with-hiv-in-tigray-179793
  
Article
In February 2021, findings from South Africa’s first National Tuberculosis Prevalence Survey were made public after delays of about a year. The survey confirmed something that has been suspected for some time – that large numbers of people who fall ill with TB in South Africa are not being diagnosed. This is firstly harmful to the health of the people who are not being diagnosed, but it is also a major obstacle to reducing the rate of new infections in the country since people who are not diagnosed and not on treatment remain infectious for much longer. According to Dr Norbert Ndjeka, Director of Drug-Resistant TB, TB, and HIV in the National Department of Health, just over 208 000 cases of TB were diagnosed in South Africa in 2020.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMSpotlight Newshttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/24/analysis-is-sa-on-course-to-solve-its-tb-diagnosis-problem/
  
Article
World Tuberculosis (TB) Day is commemorated every year on 24 March to raise awareness about TB and highlight efforts to fight to "End TB". This year's theme "Invest to End TB. Save lives." speaks to the urgency of mobilising additional resources towards achievement of global End TB targets. The COVID-19 pandemic has, unfortunately, jeopardised gains made in the fight towards these targets. Research, in particular, is an important tool in the fight to end TB. As the WHO's Director General Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, stated in the lead up to World TB Day: "Urgent investments are needed to develop and expand access to the most innovative services and tools to prevent, detect and treat TB." The TREATS (Tuberculosis Reduction through Expanded Antiretroviral Treatment and Screening for Active TB) Project aims to measure the success of a 'universal test and treat' project called PopART focused on reducing the prevalence and incidence of TB in 21 communities in South Africa and Zambia, whilst also raising awareness of TB and HIV through community engagement and linking anyone who tested positive for TB or HIV to immediate treatment. The project, which is funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP), started in November 2017 and will end in April 2022. The Health Systems Trust is the implementing partner for the TREATS project in South Africa.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=110
  
Article
World TB Day is observed on 24 March each year. This year’s theme ‘Invest to End TB. Save Lives’ was created with the urgent need to invest in resources to ramp up the fight against the disease. As the world marks World TB Day today, one of the few drug-resistant patients in South Africa has expressed relief at being able to be treated with the shorter oral regimen, BPaL, comprised of bedaquiline, pretomanid and linezolid. Instead of the usual 18 months, Bruno Da Silva can now be treated for drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in six months.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/24/world-tb-day-drug-resistant-patient-grateful-for-new-treatment/
  
Article
The World Health Organisation recently published a report on how the marketing of breast-milk substitutes impacts mothers’ decisions when it comes to infant feeding. The multi-country study was conducted in eight countries – South Africa, Bangladesh, Mexico, Morocco, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, Vietnam, and the United Kingdom. It found that formula companies use manipulative marketing tactics that distort science and medicine to legitimise their claims and push their products and ultimately, undermine parents’ confidence in breastfeeding. Two new moms share their breastfeeding experiences with us.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/24/career-moms-share-their-breastfeeding-journeys/
  
Article
The Government Chest Hospital in the city’s Jericho neighborhood is regarded as one of the top hubs for TB testing, treatment and care in Nigeria. Even though health workers at the facility try to encourage TB patients to sustain their course of treatment until the very end, they often see patients are unwilling to do so. “We have those that do not want people around them to know they have TB, so it’s difficult for them to meet all of their appointments. We also have those that live very far from here. They often start well but over time, as the symptoms clear, they default and drug resistance may arise,” a nursing officer at the hospital told Health Policy Watch. So the World TB Day 2022 announcement of an updated WHO guideline recommending a shorter four-month treatment course for children with “non-severe” TB was a much-heralded development in the TB space as further highlighted the existing research gaps in TB. The latest recommendation relied heavily on the findings of the University College London’s SHINE Study that was conducted in South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and India.
2022-03-242022-04-01 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/looking-beyond-new-tb-vaccines/
  
Article
Today is World TB Day. It’s time to take stock of the effectiveness of our tuberculosis (TB) prevention and treatment programmes and to ask why (after Covid-19 subsides) TB will still be the leading cause of death in South Africa. At the height of any one of the four Covid-19 pandemic waves over the past two years, no one can argue they did not know the status quo around this deadly virus. Regular televised country briefings by President Cyril Ramaphosa were accompanied by daily maps and infographics telling us which provinces were hardest hit. A USSD Covid-19 line was swiftly set up and data about caseloads was just a *120* away. Regular tweets delivered regulations and warnings about mask-wearing, hand washing and restaurant occupation rates.
2022-03-232022-03-25 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-03-23-why-a-new-approach-is-needed-in-the-fight-against-south-africas-number-one-killer/
  
Article
You probably clean your shoes if you step in something muddy or disgusting (please pick up after your dog!). But when you get home, do you always de-shoe at the door? Plenty of Australians don’t. For many, what you drag in on the bottom of your shoes is the last thing on the mind as one gets home. We are environmental chemists who have spent a decade examining the indoor environment and the contaminants people are exposed to in their own homes. Although our examination of the indoor environment, via our DustSafe programme, is far from complete, on the question of whether to shoe or de-shoe in the home, the science leans toward the latter. It is best to leave your filth outside the door.
2022-03-232022-04-01 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/article/2022-03-23-no-shoes-allowed-why-its-best-to-go-bare-indoors/
  
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The Black Women's Health Imperative (BWHI) released today its 2022 National Diabetes Agenda. The agenda arrives on the American Diabetes Association's annual Alert Day, which aims to raise awareness about the dangers of diabetes. “We hope that the information and resources in our new National Diabetes Agenda will help our fellow Black women beat back the epidemic of type 2 diabetes that is plaguing our community,” said Dr. Angela Ford, Chief Programs Officer at the Black Women's Health Imperative.
2022-03-222022-03-25 12:00 AMPR Newswirehttps://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/black-womens-health-imperative-releases-2022-national-diabetes-agenda-301508107.html
  
Article
Did you know that the word ‘vagina’ is one of the most frequently flagged terms by Facebook? Or that all women’s health companies surveyed by the Centre for Intimacy Justice have had an advert rejected by Facebook and Instagram, and 50% of the brands had experienced suspension of their entire account. This type of digital silencing is called ‘cyber censorship’ – and a new campaign is calling for an end to it. The Menstrual Revolution has been launched by women’s health brand FEWE in a letter to Nick Clegg, president for global affairs at Instagram and Facebook’s parent company Meta. In it, FEWE’s CEO Rebekah Hall has called for the platforms to “address this inequality and injustice”.
2022-03-222022-03-25 12:00 AMStylist Wellbeinghttps://www.stylist.co.uk/fitness-health/wellbeing/menstrual-revolution-campaign-cyber-censorship-womens-health/636794
  
Article
Of the 60 health businesses studied that serve women’s health and health for people of diverse genders, all (100%) had experienced Facebook rejecting an advertisement at some point. Even more concerning, Facebook was also found to have suspended half (50%) of survey respondents' advertising accounts.
2022-03-222022-03-25 12:00 AMCenter for Intimacy Justice https://www.intimacyjustice.org/
  
Article
Children and adolescents diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) will benefit from a set of new guidelines that aim to shorten the treatment plan, expand preventative care, and introduce better diagnostic testing and treatments. The World Health Organisation (WHO) today released a new set of ‘game-changer’ guidelines where children and adolescents with non-severe forms of drug-susceptible TB will now be treated for four months instead of six months. The guidelines come on the back of World TB Day on March 24, and underscore the fact that children and adolescents have fallen behind adults when it comes to prevention and care associated with the disease. The theme this year for World TB Day is ‘Invest to End TB. Save Lives.’ “The WHO guidelines issued today are a game-changer for children and adolescents, helping them get diagnosed and access to care sooner, leading to better outcomes and cutting transmission. The priority now is to rapidly expand implementation of the guidance across countries to save young lives and avert suffering,” said Dr Tereza Kasaeva, Director of WHO’s Global TB Programme.
2022-03-212022-03-25 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/whos-new-tb-guidelines-a-game-changer-for-children-and-adolescents-with-non-invasive-tests-shortened-treatments/
  
Article
Mental health practitioners worldwide are warning of a massive wave of pandemic-related mental health issues that many countries are ill-equipped to address. On Monday, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Europe office and the government of Greece launched a new European programme to strengthen and improve the quality of mental health services for children and adolescents. WHO Europe Director Dr Hans Kluge told the launch that suicide was the leading cause of death in children and adolescents aged 10 to 19 living in low- and middle-income countries in the region and that over 4000 young people in this age group had killed themselves in 2015.
2022-03-212022-03-25 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/europe-address-childrens-mental-health/
  
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The latest Mental State of the World report has identified South Africa as the lowest-ranked country based on mental wellbeing. It also revealed how the mental health of younger generations has plummeted; growing up in an internet-dominated and inequitable world.  Published annually by the Mental Health Million Project, the report reached a total of 223 087 respondents from 34 countries. They form part of the Core Anglosphere, Spanish-speaking Latin America, the Arab world, Spanish & French speaking continental Europe and Africa. Data for the study uses an online assessment tool called the Mental Health Quotient (MHQ), which comprises 47 elements including both problems and assets.
2022-03-182022-03-25 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/18/mental-wellbeing-sa-hits-rock-bottom-on-global-list/
  
Article
Malawi is launching a mass vaccination campaign against wild poliovirus type 1, which is to extend to 23 million children across five southern African countries, WHO said on Friday. The campaign, to kick off Sunday, follows Malawi’s declaration of a polio outbreak on 17 February – three months after the first polio virus case in 30 years was identified in a young child in Lilongwe.  The case was the first in Africa since the region was certified free of indigenous wild poliovirus in 2020. WHO said that the region’s certification as wild polio-free remains unchanged, as the wild poliovirus strain identified had been “imported” from Pakistan. So far, no clear explanation of how the Asian virus strain may have infected an African child who had never traveled outside of the country, has been provided by WHO or Malawi health authorities. Nor has there been any explanation of why it took three months between the time the child was diagnosed and the outbreak was formally declared by WHO. But the breadth of the new campaign makes it clear the incident has been perceived as a major threat to Africa’s wild polio virus free status – with risks of subtle, silent transmission of the virus much more widely, via contaminated water and sewage, food, or human-to-human contact.
2022-03-182022-03-25 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/polio-vaccination-80-million-doses-africa/
  
Article
People at risk of HIV in Brazil and South Africa will be among the first to benefit from a highly effective, long-acting injectable HIV preventive treatment through two large-scale operational projects funded by global health agency Unitaid.  Long-acting cabotegravir is a new HIV prevention method that provides eight weeks of continuous protection against HIV infection through a single intramuscular injection.  This provides an alternative to oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which can reduce the risk of HIV infection by 99%, but only when taken as prescribed: either once a day, or before and after sex for cisgender men.  Long-acting cabotegravir addresses challenges users face with regular pills that reduce the impact of oral PrEP in real-world settings. It also mitigates fears that pills will be misinterpreted for HIV treatment and cause the user to suffer stigma, discrimination, or intimate partner violence as a result. Unitaid will partner with Fiocruz in Brazil, Wits RHI in South Africa, and local health authorities in both countries to integrate long-acting cabotegravir into national sexual health programmes, generating some of the first real-world evidence that will support wide-scale global implementation.
2022-03-182022-03-25 12:00 AMUnitaidhttps://unitaid.org/news-blog/unitaid-to-introduce-new-long-lasting-injection-to-prevent-hiv-in-brazil-and-south-africa-as-high-income-countries-begin-deployment/#en
  
Article
At a 1982 tuberculosis conference in Pretoria, one of the presenting doctors stressed that, “while one entertains a high index of suspicion for tuberculosis, one must not forget that there are other conditions which may present in a similar fashion”. Forty years later, that omen looks to have been cruelly turned on its head. A persistent cough. High fever. Night sweats. Not very long ago, patients presenting with these symptoms in South Africa were sent straight for a tuberculosis test. Not so since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. The similarity between tuberculosis and Covid-19 symptoms, and the resultant failures to exclude for tuberculosis among patients who present with them, is one of the reasons that untreated cases of South Africa’s most chronic killer have likely surged under the cover of lockdown.
2022-03-152022-03-22 12:00 AMMail & Guardianhttps://mg.co.za/health/2022-03-15-tuberculosis-south-africas-forgotten-killer/
  
Article
South African women will have to wait before laying their hands on the newly-approved dapivirine vaginal ring (DPV-VR – while the National Department of Health assesses the effectiveness of the HIV prevention device. Department of Health (DOH) spokesperson, Foster Mohale, explained the reasons for the rollout delay. “The department will review the clinical indicators and the implementation requirements approved by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA). We will assess the ring’s effectiveness, the cost of procurement product, the delivery requirements, and the potential impact on HIV incidence,” said Mohale.
2022-03-152022-03-22 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/15/dapivirine-vaginal-ring-sa-rollout-put-on-ice-for-now/
  
Article
Guidance from UNAIDS confirms that routine viral load tests are the most accurate way of determining whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) is working to suppress replication of HIV. Achieving viral suppression protects the body's immune system, helps people living with HIV stay healthy, prevents transmission of HIV to other people, and can reduce the need for more expensive second- and third-line ART regimens. A viral load test measures the number of HIV particles per millilitre of blood. In a person on treatment, a low viral load indicates that the virus is less active in the body. A high viral load indicates either that the medication is not being taken properly, or that the virus is becoming resistant to the medication. Healthcare workers play a crucial role in ensuring consistent viral load monitoring for HIV-positive children on ART, guiding the process of disclosure to the child, explaining the complexities of administering paediatric formulations to caregivers, and providing ongoing support for treatment adherence. In uThukela District, there are 5 101 patients on ART in the 0−19 age group, and the overall district rate for viral load suppression among this group is 73%. Amazizi Clinic in Bergville serves 111 of these patients, and has achieved a viral load suppression rate of 83%.
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=106
  
Article
The prevalence of discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV varies widely. Across nearly all regions, there are countries where large proportions of adults continue to hold discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV. In 52 of 58 countries with recent population-based survey data, more than 25% of people aged 15 to 49 years reported holding discriminatory attitudes towards people living with HIV, and more than 50% held discriminatory attitudes in 36 of 58 countries.
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/march/20220314_discriminatory-attitudes-remain-common
  
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The picket was timed to coincide with a promise that the reopening of the casualty department at the Charlotte Maxeke hospital would take place on Monday, 14 March. As feared though, it has still not happened. On Monday morning, a group of more than 50 health workers, including senior doctors and heads of department, held a short, dignified picket outside the accident and emergency entrance of the 600-bed Helen Joseph Hospital in Johannesburg. The picket was organised to highlight the adverse impact that the continued closure of Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) is having on the quality of health services at Helen Joseph Hospital and on the morale and safety of people who work there.
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-03-14-frontline-workers-at-helen-joseph-hospital-add-voices-to-call-for-urgent-reopening-of-charlotte-maxeke/
  
Article
One of the great paradoxes in healthcare in South Africa is that, while we have many impressive healthcare experts in the country, most of our provincial health departments, the entities tasked with managing the provision of most healthcare services in the country, are poorly managed. Currently, this disconnect is particularly apparent in Gauteng. The province is the country’s economic centre. It houses multiple medical training institutions, a number of leading service delivery NGOs, scores of top researchers and research entities, and of course, much of South Africa’s private healthcare sector is headquartered in the province. The province is also comparatively rich in the non-health skills required to run a provincial health department – finance, administration and so on.
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/14/editorial-dysfunctional-provincial-health-departments-make-a-mockery-of-the-capable-state/
  
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At the age of 17, Xichavo Mhangani, fought and overcame not only childhood cancer but also hunger as he faced his journey alone. Now 19, the young man can look back at a period he describes as the most difficult of his life. Not only did he fight cancer without the support of his parents, but hunger as well, as he struggled to keep his family alive. His siblings regard him as their hero given his brave efforts. Mhangani, 15 at the time, had to step up and become both a father and mother to his two younger siblings when his mother passed away. Their mother was their only source of hope with their father out of the picture. “I believe that I became a man at a very young age. Our mom was the only family we had and to be honest, life has never been easy for us since her death. My cancer diagnoses only made it worse,” he said. 
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/14/childhood-cancer-heroic-teen-beats-disease-while-fighting-hunger/
  
Article
Thank you Ambassador Ghislain D'hoop and Belgium as the Chair of the 65th Commission on Narcotic Drugs, distinguished members of the Commission, Member States, Civil Society and networks of people who use drugs, UN agencies and all colleagues… Last year UNAIDS worked with all countries and partners to develop and adopt the Global AIDS Strategy. The golden thread of the strategy is on ending inequalities in an epidemic where 65% of all new infections are within particular groups – and these include people who use drugs and prison inmates. We know that if we continue as we are, if we do not close the inequalities in the HIV response - the world could see 7.7 million AIDS deaths over the next ten years.
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/march/20220314_65th-session-commission-on-narcotic-drugs
  
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Discovery is starting to sell private health cover in South Africa at about a third of the price of its prior entry-level product, a move to attract new customers and tap into pandemic-heightened concerns about health. The administrator of the country’s largest medical-insurance provider, which has more than 40% market share, will offer primary care for about R350 a month, giving customers access to a network of doctors, emergency procedures and treatment for chronic conditions including HIV.
2022-03-142022-03-22 12:00 AMBloomberghttps://businesstech.co.za/news/finance/567686/discovery-to-offer-ultra-low-cost-health-cover-in-south-africa/
  
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“Today, we call for an immediate cessation of all attacks on health care in Ukraine. These horrific attacks are killing and causing serious injuries to patients and health workers, destroying vital health infrastructure and forcing thousands to forgo accessing health services despite catastrophic needs. "To attack the most vulnerable – babies, children, pregnant women, and those already suffering from illness and disease, and health workers risking their own lives to save lives – is an act of unconscionable cruelty. “In Ukraine, since the start of the war, 31 attacks on health care have been documented via the WHO’s Surveillance System for Attacks on Health Care (SSA). According to these reports, in 24 incidents health care facilities were damaged or destroyed, while in five cases ambulances were damaged or destroyed. These attacks have led to at least 12 deaths and 34 injuries, and affected access to and availability of essential health services. WHO is verifying further reports, as attacks continue to be reported despite the calls for protection of health care.
2022-03-132022-03-22 12:00 AMJoint statement from UNICEF, UNFPA, and WHOhttps://www.who.int/news/item/13-03-2022-stop-attacks-on-health-care-in-ukraine
  
Article
The disease was once a virtual death sentence for children. Today, his aggressive treatments mean that almost everyone survives it. Dr. Donald Pinkel, a pediatrician who, starting in the early 1960s, developed an aggressive treatment for childhood leukemia that transformed the disease from a virtual death sentence to one that almost every patient survives, died on Wednesday at his home in San Luis Obispo, Calif. He was 95.
2022-03-122022-03-22 12:00 AMNew York Timeshttps://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/12/health/donald-pinkel-dead.html
  
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Sexual health experts and government officials are warning that without federal action, millions of Americans could face severe, even fatal, consequences if infections go untested and untreated. Two-plus years of pandemic isolation didn’t lower the nation’s record rates of sexually transmitted diseases. Instead, they got much worse. After an initial dip when the pandemic began in the spring of 2020, cases of gonorrhea and syphilis surged, reaching new highs by the end of the year, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Progress on HIV, which President Donald Trump pledged to end by 2030, also slowed significantly. Public health experts expect that when the CDC releases 2021 numbers later this year, they will show that Covid-19 made a bad situation exponentially worse as clinics closed, people lost health insurance and risky behavior surged.
2022-03-122022-03-22 12:00 AMPolitico https://www.politico.com/news/2022/03/12/covid-std-crisis-00015717
  
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Despite integrated interventions, the Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), remains worried as South Africa’s HIV-TB mortality rates continue to soar. CAPRISA, a global research organisation, released a study that demonstrated that the mortality benefit from health systems process improvements in real-world operational settings remains a challenge. It assessed the impact of quality improvement for HIV-TB integration on mortality within 40 primary healthcare clinics in SA between 2016 and 2018. Prof Kogieleum Naidoo, the study’s primary author, said the mortality rates in those co-infected with HIV and TB, were still ‘unacceptably high’. “We want to make sure that we are saving lives. So, while our goal was to show improvement in mortality, we didn’t show an appreciable difference in mortality,” she said.
2022-03-112022-03-14 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/11/hiv-tb-mortality-rates-sa-needs-to-stem-the-tide/
  
Article
The nonprofit International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM) today announced that the monthly dapivirine vaginal ring received regulatory approval from the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) for its use by women ages 18 and older to reduce their HIV risk. This marks a major milestone that brings the first long-acting and woman-controlled product another step closer to reaching women. “This approval is a positive step toward offering women more prevention options they can use to control their health on their own terms. We are delighted to continue celebrating International Women’s Day with this news for women’s HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health,” said Dr. Zeda Rosenberg, IPM’s founder and CEO. “We look forward to collaborating with the South African government and partners to incorporate the monthly ring into the health system, and into women’s lives in South Africa.”
2022-03-112022-03-22 12:00 AMInternational Partnership for Microbicideshttps://www.ipmglobal.org/content/south-africa-approves-dapivirine-vaginal-ring-use-women
  
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As Tuesday’s deadline for the end – or the extension – of South Africa’s National State of Disaster looms, the Cabinet is yet to announce alternative regulations to manage Covid-19. Until such time, the country is still on Adjusted Alert Level 1 regulations, despite growing calls for them to be scrapped over concerns of economic recovery. Agitation is growing as the government continues to be vague in providing details on the lifting of the National State of Disaster, which is scheduled for Tuesday, 15 March – marking two years since it was first declared in response to the pandemic. 
2022-03-112022-03-22 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-03-11-sa-left-to-languish-as-deadline-for-ending-or-extending-national-state-of-disaster-looms/
  
Article
About 200 nurses protested on a field in Bhisho on Wednesday against the provincial Department of Health’s decision not to hire them when they complete their training at the end of March.They are among over 630 nursing students whose contracts will be terminated soon, despite a contractual agreement that they must work for the department for about four years after they qualify. The department funds the nurses’ four years of study and then they are expected to work in the provincial health service for four years. But this year the department says it does not have enough money to take them on.
2022-03-112022-03-22 12:00 AMGrounduphttps://www.groundup.org.za/article/student-nurses-eastern-cape-demand-jobs-provincial-government/
  
Article
New technology that allows for daily medications to instead be taken just once a week or month could transform the lives of people with conditions ranging from schizophrenia to opioid addiction, researchers have said. The method has also been developed for a new type of contraceptive pill – a capsule, initially tested in pigs, that dissolves in the stomach to release a six-armed structure that delivers synthetic hormones over three weeks before falling apart and exiting the body. Lyndra, the company that is developing the technology – backed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation – plans to start phase 1 trials in humans towards the end of this year. And the technology is also being applied to a host of other medications, including ivermectin for eradicating malaria. A once-a-week pill containing risperidone, an antipsychotic used for people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is to go into clinical trials this year, the company said, and is expected to be submitted for approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by the end of next year, with approval hoped for by the end of 2024.
2022-03-112022-03-22 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/mar/11/hopes-raised-for-once-a-week-pills-for-range-of-conditions
  
Article
A 57-year-old man with terminal heart disease who made history as the first person to receive a genetically modified pig’s heart died on Tuesday at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), the hospital said. David Bennett received the transplant on January 7. His condition began deteriorating several days ago, the hospital said on Wednesday, and he was given “compassionate palliative care” after it became clear that he would not recover. Bennett “wasn’t able to overcome what turned out to be the devastating debilitation” caused by the heart failure he experienced before the transplant, Dr Bartley Griffith, director of the UMCC cardiac transplant programme, said in a videotaped statement.
2022-03-102022-03-14 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/health/watch-worlds-first-person-to-receive-transplanted-genetically-modified-pig-heart-dies-ae7ef252-dc59-5504-85ca-2b7e9ce225b1
  
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For most of his medical career, KwaZulu-Natal vascular surgeon Dr Vinesh Padayachy has been fighting a silent illness: lymphatic and venous disease. Now, two years after the Covid-19 pandemic upended the medical world, Padayachy has found himself on a new medical front line – understanding the long-term effect Covid is having on his patients and people with lymphatic and venous diseases. “The scientific world is continuously making new discoveries on what has become known as long-haul or long-term Covid. People who have lymphatic and venous Diseases such as deep vein thrombosis, lipedema, lymphoedema, spider veins, varicose veins, and venous leg ulcers and who have contracted Covid should especially take precaution,” Padayachy said.
2022-03-102022-03-14 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/news/as-sa-moves-towards-scrapping-covid-regulations-doctors-find-themselves-on-a-new-medical-front-line-fde1c845-28f8-43ed-9144-ef379bb2fb25
  
Article
Gauteng MEC for Health, Dr. Nomathemba Mokgethi confirmed that the Helen Joseph Hospital has seen an increase in the number of mental healthcare admissions due to a number of reasons. This includes hundreds of patients, seeking care from outside the hospital’s feeder area, flocking to the facility. Mokgethi added that an increase in poor socio-economic circumstances worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of illegal substances, and families who refuse to take back their relatives once discharged, have put additional pressure on the hospital. She was responding to a legislature question and also cited the temporary closure of some sections of the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) as another contributing factor.
2022-03-092022-03-14 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/09/helen-joseph-hospital-sees-uptick-in-mental-health-admissions/
  
Article
Congratulations on International Women’s Day to all whose determination and solidarity is the light of hope and the power for change. Women are not waiting to be offered a seat at the table, they are bringing their own fold-up chair. This year’s theme calls for “Gender equality today for a sustainable tomorrow”. As the women’s movements have brought to the fore, and as all the evidence demonstrates, every development goal depends on ensuring the rights of all women and girls. Gender inequality is a threat to everyone. We cannot uphold patriarchy and defeat AIDS.
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/march/international-women-day
  
Article
On International Women’s Day, we celebrate the power and potential of women and girls. We recognize their courage, resilience and leadership. We mark the ways in which we are making progress towards a more gender-equal world. At the same time, we see how that progress is being undermined by multiple, interlocking and compounding generational crises. Currently, we are witnessing the horrifying situation in Ukraine where the impacts on women and girls, including the hundreds of thousands displaced, remind us: all conflicts, from Ukraine to Myanmar to Afghanistan, from the Sahel to Yemen, exact their highest price from women and girls. The Secretary- General has been clear, War Must Stop.
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMUnited Nations Womenhttps://www.unwomen.org/en/news-stories/statement/2022/03/celebrating-the-solution-multipliers
  
Article
t is no surprise that the World Health Organization (WHO) is calling for oxygen and critical medical supplies to safely reach those who need them in Ukraine and moving to establish safe transit for shipments through Poland. But nor is the call new. We`ve been here before. Russian annexation of Crimea and the conflict in the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts of Eastern Ukraine in 2014 threatened the supply of HIV and tuberculosis medicines. Fragile trans-internal border efforts and financing by the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria allowed the continued supply of the medicines in the separatist territories despite the conflict during the last eight years. One has to assume that should Russia occupy new Ukraine territories, the challenges to guarantee people living with tuberculosis and HIV access to those drugs will be just as great, high risk, if not already lost
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMThe Telegraph https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/terror-and-security/cannot-let-war-ukraine-derail-hiv-tb-covid-19-treatment-eastern/
  
Article
With capable leadership and guidance, Elvira Singh revitalised the National Cancer Registry, effectively dealing with the backlog that negatively affected its image as a reputable registry. She also developed the first urban population-based cancer registry in South Africa, in the City of Ekurhuleni, with the first report published in 2018. The cancer epidemiology research community in South Africa and throughout the world is devastated by the passing of our dear friend and colleague, Dr Elvira Singh, on Sunday, 27 February. Elvira graduated as a medical doctor from the University of KwaZulu-Natal at the end of 2000 and received her master’s degree in community health at Wits in April 2009, as well as her fellowship in public health from the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa in May 2009, winning the Henry Gluckman Medal for Best Candidate.
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-03-08-remembering-dr-elvira-singh-the-gentle-giant-behind-the-national-cancer-registry/
  
Article
Since the start of the global HIV epidemic, women in many regions have been disproportionately affected by HIV. Today, women constitute more than half of all people living with HIV1 and AIDS-related illnesses remain the leading cause of death for women aged between 5 and 49. Young women (aged 15-24), and adolescent girls (aged 10-19) in particular, account for a disproportionate number of new HIV infections. In 2017, 7,000 adolescent girls and young women became HIV-positive. This is a far higher rate than new infections among young men, with young women twice as likely to acquire HIV as their male peers. In sub-Saharan Africa, despite making up just 10% of the population, one out of every five new HIV infections happens among adolescent girls and young women. In the worse-affected countries, 80% of new HIV infections among adolescents are among girls, who are up to eight times more likely to be living with HIV than adolescent boys. It is estimated that around 50 adolescent girls die every day from AIDS-related illnesses.
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMAverthttps://www.avert.org/professionals/hiv-social-issues/key-affected-populations/women
  
Article
This International Women’s Day (IWD) wheelchair bound farmer, Lydia Nemafhohoni, wants other disabled women to know they can break the biases they face. Left paralysed by a bout of childhood polio, she fights a double bias: for being disabled and for being a woman. Now she’s on a mission to help other disabled women feel empowered instead of “feeling sorry for themselves”.
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/08/international-womens-day-this-disabled-female-farmer-wont-be-held-back/
  
Article
Dr Fareed Abdullah and Professor Helen Rees, two South African medical practitioners with a long history of working for better healthcare and human rights within South Africa and the global community, were recently appointed to the French National Order of Merit by French President Emmanuel Macron. In the realm of health and human rights, both Dr Fareed Abdullah and Professor Helen Rees have been a consistent and dedicated presence within South Africa and the international community for more than 25 years. They have shaped healthcare policies and responses, riding out periods of turbulent change in the form of the HIV/Aids crisis and, more recently, the Covid-19 pandemic. In a decision taken by French President Emmanuel Macron on 7 February and announced on 22 February, Abdullah and Rees were appointed as Knight of the French National Order of Merit and Officer of the French National Order of Merit, respectively.
2022-03-082022-03-14 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-03-08-two-south-african-health-sector-veterans-appointed-to-french-national-order-of-merit/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1646727005
  
Article
Gender inequality and discrimination robs women and girls of their fundamental human rights, including the right to education, health and economic opportunities. The resulting disempowerment also denies women and girls sexual autonomy, decision-making power, dignity and safety. These impacts are most pronounced in sub-Saharan Africa, where adolescent girls and young women (aged 15 to 24 years) accounted for 25% of HIV infections in 2020, despite representing just 10% of the population.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMUNAIDS https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/march/20220307_women-girls-carry-heaviest-hiv-burden-sub-saharan-africa
  
Article
South Africa ranks amongst the high-burden tuberculosis (TB), drug-resistant TB and HIV-co-infected TB countries, globally. However, over the past decade it has made significant progress in turning the tide by adopting the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended diagnostic technologies and therapies for both prevention and management to reduce the burden of the disease. In addition, the strengthening of HIV management has improved in parallel. These interventions have caused in a year-on-year decline in TB incidence, resulting in South Africa being one of six countries to achieve the End TB Strategy milestones for 2020, namely a 20% reduction in new TB cases (incident rate) between 2015 and 2020. Another success is that South Africa is one of 18 high-burden countries to achieve a greater than 80% coverage of testing for Rifampicin (a key drug for the treatment of drug susceptibly TB) resistance. While there have been great strides in reducing the number of TB cases, the burden remains high and efforts to further decrease the burden of disease need to continue to achieve the ultimate goal of Ending TB by 2035.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMNICD https://www.nicd.ac.za/turning-the-tide-on-tb/
  
Article
Respiratory diseases are highly infectious and cause a significant health burden. Disease surveillance is the bedrock of public health responses to outbreaks or epidemics caused by these diseases. Effective surveillance gives an indication of the scale of the problem. But traditional disease surveillance is mostly limited to health facilities or surveillance sites, where doctors and nurses identify cases and report to national authorities. Here, a team from South Africa’s National Institute for Communicable Diseases talks about another useful tool: community-based surveillance.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMNICD https://www.nicd.ac.za/tracking-symptoms-of-respiratory-diseases-online-can-give-a-picture-of-community-health/
  
Article
Malaria is an old disease. Yet it continues to have devastating impacts on poor people, especially in Africa. To fight the disease, countries primarily use insecticide-treated bed nets to control the mosquitoes that transmit malaria parasites, or medicines to treat malaria patients. These measures have been highly effective over the years. But now they are threatened by mosquitoes resisting the insecticides, and parasites resisting the drug treatments.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/some-malaria-parasites-are-evading-detection-tests-causing-an-urgent-threat-to-public-health-177258
  
Article
Thousands of migrants go missing or die each year along migration routes. In 2018, United Nations Member States committed to “save lives and establish coordinated international efforts on missing migrants” by adopting the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM). Four years and more than 15,000 documented deaths later, efforts to provide a meaningful response to this ongoing human tragedy cannot be put off any further.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/07-03-2022-act-now-to-save-lives-and-prevent-migrants-from-going-missing
  
Article
No one likes the idea of popping pills every morning. Take cholesterol-lowering medicines or statins, for example. To get themselves off the hook, many patients with high cholesterol levels tend to believe that diet changes and other lifestyle modifications alone would work.

Interestingly, when it comes to lowering cholesterol levels, being diligent with your medicine is far more beneficial than giving up wagyu beef. A local study by SingHealth Polyclinics (SHP) has found “adherence to medication to be the most critical factor” compared to other considerations such as ethnicity, diet, exercise and smoking.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMCAN Lifestylehttps://cnalifestyle.channelnewsasia.com/wellness/how-lower-high-cholesterol-levels-medicine-diet-exercise-304936
  
Article
Adding drinks with a high fructose content to a diet that already includes high fat content can accelerate the chances of fatty liver disease, according to scientists at the University of Barcelona.
What to know:
• A high intake of fructose may increase the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, in which too much fat is stored in liver cells.
• High-fructose corn syrup is one of the most common sweeteners in the food industry and is used to sweeten many products despite the scientific evidence that it is associated with metabolic disorders that are risk factors of cardiovascular disease.
• Researchers found that consuming a high-fructose diet for long periods can lead to a deterioration of the layer of cells that creates the intestinal barrier that prevents bacteria and toxins from leaking into the bloodstream and affecting the liver.
• Fatty liver disease can lead to liver inflammation and liver damage, resulting in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, a more aggressive disease that in turn can progress to scarring of the liver (cirrhosis), liver cancer, and liver failure.
• Severe fatty liver disease and liver tumors from the gut barrier deterioration created by excessive fructose intake can be prevented with medications.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMMedscape https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/969784?src=soc_tw_220308_mscpedt_news_mdscp_fattyliver&faf=1
  
Article
Mr. Guterres highlighted the contribution that women have made to ending the COVID-19 pandemic, hailed the ideas, innovations and activism that are changing our world for the better, and welcomed more women leaders across all walks of life. However, as the UN chief pointed out, women and girls have frequently borne the brunt of the consequences of the virus spreading worldwide, which have included girls and women being shut out of schools and workplaces, led to rising poverty and rising violence, and seen women doing the vast majority of the world’s unpaid but essential care work. To remedy the situation, Mr. Guterres called for guaranteed quality education for every girl, massive investments in women’s training and decent work, effective action to end gender-based violence, and universal health care. Other measures recommended by the UN chief include gender quotas, that could result in the world benefiting from more women leaders.
2022-03-072022-03-14 12:00 AMUnited Nations Womenhttps://news.un.org/en/story/2022/03/1113392
  
Article
More than 1 billion people worldwide are obese – 650 million adults, 340 million adolescents and 39 million children. This number is still increasing. WHO estimates that by 2025, approximately 167 million people – adults and children – will become less healthy because they are overweight or obese. On the occasion of World Obesity Day 2022, WHO is urging countries to do more to reverse this predictable and preventable health crisis. Obesity is a disease impacting most body systems. It affects the heart, liver, kidneys, joints, and reproductive system. It leads to a range of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke, various forms of cancer, as well as mental health issues. People with obesity are also three times more likely to be hospitalized for COVID-19. The key to preventing obesity is to act early, ideally even before a baby is conceived. Good nutrition in pregnancy, followed by exclusive breastfeeding until the age of 6 months and continued breastfeeding until 2 years and beyond, is best for all infants and young children.
2022-03-042022-03-14 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/04-03-2022-world-obesity-day-2022-accelerating-action-to-stop-obesity
  
Article
One of the most popular questions I get asked is, ‘Is skin not just skin? Bar colour, is it that different?’
Really?
Yes, really.
There are similarities, but Black skin is physiologically different to white skin in a few ways.
There are also cultural differences in the way we treat the skin.
2022-03-032022-03-04 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/health-news-south-africa/2022-03-03-melanin-magic-everything-that-makes-black-skin-unique/
  
Article
As the globe marks World Birth Defects Day today, many South African mothers and fathers are still gripped by fear based on superstitions and myths. Frustrated by this trend, a Limpopo doctor is educating parents about birth defects to empower them to accept their children’s conditions, and follow medical advice. Mashudu Modjadji is afraid her 16-month-old son will die because this is what relatives and strangers constantly tell her. The reason is a reddish mark that developed on her son’s neck when he was six-months-old. This Limpopo mom is one of thousands of parents who battle superstition and myths, and whose children face judgement because of birth defects.
2022-03-032022-03-14 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/03/world-birth-defects-day-parents-gripped-by-superstitious-fear/
  
Article
The increasing use of social media, particularly in African countries, offers several opportunities to promote messages about sexual health behaviours among young adults on the continent. It can complement existing sexual health promotion strategies, particularly when physical distancing measures limits opportunities to meet and interact in person. In addition, the fact that social media platforms allow for multi-directional communication opens new possibilities. Young people don’t just need to be passive consumers of sexual health information. They can also actively engage on sexual health issues in their private space at a time convenient for them. But are these opportunities being used?
2022-03-032022-03-14 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/young-africans-sexual-health-and-social-media-which-messages-work-which-dont-177265
  
Article
One of the biggest developments in HIV in the last decade or so was the discovery that certain antiretrovirals are highly effective at preventing HIV infection. Yet, the provision and uptake of such HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have been slow, particularly in South Africa, where HIV infection rates in young women and girls remain stubbornly high. But there are signs that the tide may be turning, both here and internationally. “It’s really encouraging to see quite rapid increase in PrEP initiations over the past five years,” Dr Rachel Baggaley, of the World Health Organization (WHO), told attendees at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI).
2022-03-022022-03-04 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/02/programme-provides-hiv-prevention-pills-in-schools/
  
Article
The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has issued an infringement notice of $2,664 to a NSW based herbal medicine practitioner for an alleged breach of the Advertising Code. It is alleged that the individual advertised, on their social media, the use and supply of herbal and complementary medicine products implying that those products could be used to treat and prevent coronavirus and COVID-19 infection. The advertising allegedly claimed the products were "a miracle covid treatment that no-one is speaking about". The goods themselves were advertised to "…address COVID infection by reducing viral load, …combats cytokine storms and lowers risk of lung damage".
2022-03-022022-03-04 12:00 AMTherapeutic Goods Administration Australia https://www.tga.gov.au/media-release/herbal-medicine-practitioner-fined-2664-making-miracle-claims
  
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The Free State Health Department hopes boosting orthopaedic capacity at district hospitals will help eradicate long waiting times for patients. At the moment, the Pelonomi Regional Hospital in Bloemfontein, is under severe strain due to the number of referrals. Department spokesperson, Mondli Mvambi, said an assessment of complaints of patients awaiting surgery found that delays are often caused by emergency trauma cases that supersede scheduled procedures. “These cancellations frustrate patients who are awaiting surgeries, or those who have been prepared overnight. Some skip food for days while waiting for a new slot,” he said.
2022-03-022022-03-04 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/02/orthopaedic-capacity-boost-for-free-state-hospitals/
  
Article
Three years of fundraising has finally paid off for the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital which now boasts a newly-upgraded emergency centre. The Children’s Hospital Trust’s fundraising team raised a total of R122 million and the Western Cape government contributed another R1 164 193. The rest was funded by various donors. Annually, the hospital cares for over 250 000 patients and its latest addition is the only paediatric emergency centre that operates 24/7 in Southern Africa.
2022-03-022022-03-04 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/02/red-cross-childrens-hospital-continues-trailblazing-journey/
  
Article
In a bid to do away with outdated, painful finger sticks, the South African Diabetes Advocacy wants sensor technology made available for all those living with Type 1 diabetes. The non-profit organisation (NPO) lodged an appeal with the Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) to include new non-invasive flash glucose sensor monitors as a Prescribed Minimum Benefit (PMB). Bridget McNulty, SA Diabetes Advocacy Chairperson, confirmed their campaign has plenty of backing.
2022-03-012022-03-04 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/03/01/support-for-diabetes-sensor-technology-gathers-momentum/
  
Article
Rolling out a new HIV prevention injection should be a priority in South Africa, says Thandi Maluka, Executive Director of HIV activist group Positive Women’s Network (PWN). She says an HIV prevention injection, administered every two months, is going to make life easier for many people, especially young people. This is because the injection can be taken more discreetly than prevention pills. “This one time per two months injection will give the young people their dignity and privacy because no one will know you are on PrEP unless you tell them,” she says. (PrEP stands for pre-exposure prophylaxis and refers to antiretrovirals taken to prevent HIV infection.) The only form of PrEP currently available in the public healthcare system in South Africa is a daily pill containing the antiretroviral (ARV) drugs tenofovir and emtricitabine. The pill is, however, not available at all healthcare facilities and so far uptake has been poor.
2022-03-012022-03-04 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/03/01/prioritise-hiv-prevention-injection-activists-say/
  
Article
Nargis was born in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, into a large family. Life was not easy, and she was sent to a boarding school for low-income families. Her favourite subject at school was physical education, excelling at basketball and swimming. She hoped that after graduating from school in 1991 with a diploma in physical education she would continue her studies at a technical school. However, because of unrest in the country, she couldn’t carry on with her schooling. “I cried for six months, I really wanted to continue my studies, but instead of going to a technical school, my parents married me off. I was not yet 16 years old then,” said Nargis. When she was 17 years old, she gave birth to a son; five years later, while pregnant with her second child, she learned that her husband was involved in drug trafficking, and he was sent to prison.
2022-03-012022-03-04 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/featurestories/2022/march/20220301_tajikistan
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