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About 38 million people around the world are living with HIV. About 70% of them live in Africa. This shows that there is no solution to the AIDS pandemic without a solution in Africa. In 2021, there were 1.5 million new cases of HIV – just over 4,000 cases per day around the world. At the same time, close to 700,000 people died. The big challenge is to address the dual realities of people still dying from HIV in large numbers, and the large numbers of new infections. The upside is that there is a clear plan with clear goals on how to address this. In 2016, countries came together at the United Nations to agree on what the world’s strategy should be. The goal is to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030. We spoke with leading scientist Professor Salim Abdool Karim about how to close the gaps.
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMHealth-e Newshttps://health-e.org.za/2023/01/23/hiv-remains-a-leading-killer-in-africa-despite-medical-breakthroughs-how-to-eliminate-it/
  
Article
In laboratories in Tanzania and Nairobi, rats have been trained to sniff out tuberculosis. Already known for finding land mines, the rodents could now transform the way the disease is detected. The African giant pouched rats work with scientists at the APOPO Project, a Belgian non-profit organisation in Tanzania, because they can detect the smell of the deadly disease.
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMAfricanewshttps://www.africanews.com/2023/01/22/african-laboratories-training-rats-to-quickly-detect-tuberculosis/
  
Article
In October last year, the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) alerted the public to a measles outbreak in Limpopo. Since then, four more provinces have reported outbreaks, and the number of positive cases in the country has climbed rapidly. Last week’s measles report from the NICD indicated that between the first week of October 2022 and mid-week in the second week of January 2023, a total of 397 cases of measles were identified across the country. Of those, 382 cases were detected in five provinces – Limpopo 145, North West 125, Mpumalanga 79, Gauteng 18, and the Free State 15. These five provinces have all met the criteria for a measles outbreak (three or more cases in a district within a month).
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2023/01/23/in-depth-as-schools-open-will-measles-outbreaks-get-worse/
  
Article
Record numbers of women are not being screened for cervical cancer, official figures show, as a leading charity urged ministers to commit to eliminating the disease. Cervical cancer is the 14th most common cancer among women in the UK. About 3,200 women are diagnosed with it each year, of whom more than a quarter die.
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMThe Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/society/2023/jan/23/cervical-cancer-record-number-women-england-not-screened
  
Article
Five billion people globally remain unprotected from harmful trans fat, a new status report from WHO has found, increasing their risk of heart disease and death. Since WHO first called for the global elimination of industrially produced trans fat in 2018 – with an elimination target set for 2023 – population coverage of best-practice policies has increased almost six-fold. Forty-three countries have now implemented best-practice policies for tackling trans fat in food, with 2.8 billion people protected globally. Despite substantial progress, however, this still leaves 5 billion worldwide at risk from trans fat’s devastating health impacts with the global goal for its total elimination in 2023 remaining unattainable at this time.
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMWHOhttps://www.who.int/news/item/23-01-2023-five-billion-people-unprotected-from-trans-fat-leading-to-heart-disease
  
Article
WHO is launching its 2023 health emergency appeal today for US$ 2.54 billion to provide assistance to millions of people around the world facing health emergencies. The number of people in need of humanitarian relief has increased by almost a quarter compared to 2022, to a record 339 million.
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMWHOhttps://www.who.int/news/item/23-01-2023-who-launches-funding-appeal-to-help-a-record-number-of-people-in-complex--intersecting-health-emergencies
  
Article
The end of the Mosaico HIV vaccine trial must lead to a continued drive to innovate as well as an urgency to ensure that proven HIV prevention and treatment options reach all who need them, says UNAIDS. Rapid progress against the HIV pandemic is possible if existing prevention and treatment options are made available through the sharing of technologies, expanding provision, and tackling barriers to access. The development, and sharing, of long-acting prevention and treatment options are also important to expand coverage. “The disappointment of the vaccine trial further underlines the importance of rolling out available HIV treatment and prevention innovations, including oral PrEP, long acting injectables and the vaginal ring,” said UNAIDS Executive Director, Winnie Byanyima. “The search for a vaccine must continue, but it’s important to remember that despite this setback the world can still end AIDS by 2030 by delivering all the proven prevention and treatment options to all the people who need them.”
2023-01-232023-01-31 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2023/january/20230123_trial
  
Article
Women with HIV who had greater cumulative viremia had an increased risk of multimorbidity and developing five vascular-related non-AIDS comorbidities, according to a recent study. “In prior analyses evaluating the burden of non-AIDS comorbidities in women with and without HIV, we found that the overall burden of 10 comorbidities assessed was higher in women with vs. without HIV, and that comorbidity burden in women with HIV was primarily associated with traditional as opposed to HIV-related risk factors,” Lauren F. Collins, MD, MSc, assistant professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at Emory University, told Healio.
2023-01-222023-01-31 12:00 AMHealiohttps://www.healio.com/news/infectious-disease/20230120/higher-hiv-viral-load-among-women-on-art-increases-risk-of-nonaids-comorbidities
  
Article
The National Health Department said the South African Medical Association Trade Union (Samatu) should refrain from protest action based on false information, after the trade union threatened to march to the department's head offices later this month.
2023-01-222023-01-31 12:00 AMEWNhttps://ewn.co.za/2023/01/22/health-dept-samatu-should-refrain-from-protesting-over-false-information
  
Article
The nursing crisis has been deepening for years, and not even the ANC’s ambitions for National Health Insurance (NHI) seem enough of an incentive to awaken a sense of urgency in health minister Joe Phaala. NHI, the government’s plan for universal health coverage, rests heavily on nurse-led care. Yet where these nurses will come from is a mystery.
2023-01-202023-01-31 12:00 AMBusiness Dayhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/opinion/editorials/2023-01-20-editorial-health-minister-must-intervene-now-to-stop-care-catastrophe/
  
Article
When it comes to the health and wellbeing of women, we are at a critical juncture. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a devastating backsliding on women’s health – and without increased investment, we won’t be able to take back the losses inflicted by the pandemic and regain progress against the SDGs. This was recognized in a main session at the World Economic Forum earlier this week. The session gathered global leaders from across sectors to discuss the significant economic benefits of investing in women and how to accelerate global prioritization and investment in health to create a healthier, more equitable world for all.
2023-01-202023-01-31 12:00 AMWorld Economic Forumhttps://www.weforum.org/agenda/2023/01/davos2023-womens-health-rethinking-the-cost-as-an-investment-for-societal-gain/
  
Article
The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted tuberculosis (TB) related services, which has increased the urgency of TB vaccine development. Recently, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), announced the creation of the TB Vaccine Accelerator Council at a high-level panel at a World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
2023-01-202023-01-31 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Sciencehttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20230120/WHO-to-launch-council-to-accelerate-the-development-of-TB-vaccine.aspx
  
Article
New research suggests that reservoir cells’ surfaces more frequently contain proteins that help them evade the immune system’s detection as well as improve their resilience against attack. Though these biomarkers are not universal, they may eventually lead to therapies that target these cells, allowing for drug-free HIV remission. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) protects cells without HIV from becoming infected with the virus, but it doesn’t attack dormant cells where the virus lies waiting for an opportunity to strike. On ART, these rare cells—collectively called the latent reservoir—remain asleep. However, if ART is stopped, reservoir cells can awaken, churn out new HIV, and infect other cells in the body. Because of this, an HIV cure is unlikely to work without eliminating or permanently suppressing reservoir cells.
2023-01-202023-01-31 12:00 AMAidsmaphttps://www.aidsmap.com/news/jan-2023/hiv-reservoir-cells-have-surface-proteins-aid-evading-immune-attack
  
Article
Janssen pharmaceuticals, the research branch of Johnson & Johnson, said yesterday that they were "disappointed" that the latest HIV candidate vaccine, and the only one left in a phase III efficacy trial, had failed to reach pre-specified standards of efficacy. For this reason, they had terminated the Mosaico Study, which gave the vaccine or a placebo to 3,900 cis and trans gay and bisexual men and trans women in the Americas and Europe. Mitchell Warren, director of prevention advocacy organisation AVAC, commented: “We always hope that efficacy trials will show positive results that lead to new prevention options... [but] the hard truth is the science of HIV vaccine development is extremely challenging".
2023-01-192023-01-31 12:00 AMAidsmaphttps://www.aidsmap.com/news/jan-2023/closure-hiv-vaccine-study-shows-how-far-we-have-go
  
Article
Sleeping under treated mosquito nets has proved to be an essential way to prevent malaria, even as the health ministry has adopted other proactive measures to fight two other killer diseases; tuberculosis and HIV/Aids. According to the 2022 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey, at least 54 per cent of households in the country own insecticide-treated nets (ITNs), an increase from 40 per cent in 2015.
2023-01-192023-01-31 12:00 AMThe Standardhttps://www.standardmedia.co.ke/health/health-science/article/2001465540/how-awareness-helps-in-the-fight-to-combat-hiv-malaria-and-tb
  
Article
Gender-based stigma experienced by transgender and gender-diverse people is associated with substance use and behaviors that increase a person’s odds of acquiring HIV—as well as greater engagement in HIV prevention services, a Massachusetts/Rhode Island study found.
2023-01-192023-01-31 12:00 AMThe body prohttps://www.thebodypro.com/article/research-stigma-hiv-prevention-gender-diverse-twihr
  
Article
As we approach the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, and with shifts in social media moderation, many of us continue to confront science denialism and misinformation daily. While the dangers of misinformation may be new to some, it’s nothing new to HIV/AIDS advocates, who see it as a long-existing barrier to ending the epidemic.
2023-01-182023-01-26 12:00 AMThe body todayhttps://www.thebody.com/article/aids-denialism-still-deadly
  
Article
South Africa has eight doctors for every 10 000 people in the country, 2019 World Health Organisation data shows. Although this figure is higher than in most other African countries, it's much lower than in other middle-income regions. In Latin America and the Caribbean, for instance, there are about 30 doctors per 10 000 people (when high-income countries in the region are excluded).
2023-01-172023-01-26 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/health/watch-these-doctors-want-to-work-in-sas-rural-hospitals-but-theres-no-money-to-hire-them-20230117
  
Article
An older class of diabetes drugs appeared to lower the risk of developing dementia in a study, suggesting the inexpensive medicines could be researched to help combat the growing societal burden of cognitive decline. People who took an older class of diabetes drugs known as glitazones, or TZDs, had a 22% lower risk of developing dementia in an observational study published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.
2023-01-172023-01-26 12:00 AMTimes Livehttps://www.timeslive.co.za/sunday-times/lifestyle/2023-01-17-older-diabetes-drugs-may-lower-dementia-risk/
  
Article
Given the negative publicity about the lead paint in our homes poisoning children and lead pipes contaminating our water, most people might assume that the lead industry is suffering a slow death. But even as our understanding of low-level lead exposure hazards has grown, global lead production actually increased by 75% between 2001 and 2017. In the United States (US), according to the most recent federal data, lead usage grew 26% over this same period, largely due to a rise in ammunition production and lead battery manufacturing.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/opinion/2023-01-16-poisoned-production-the-lead-industry-is-booming-its-just-moved-to-poorer-countries/
  
Article
Protecting and supporting the most vulnerable women, children, and adolescents is a challenge the world has failed to meet for far too long. Too often, just as progress is being made, we are knocked backward by war, economic crisis or the pandemic. It will not be possible to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030 by sticking to business as usual.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMWorld Economic Forumhttps://www.weforum.org/agenda/2023/01/three-ways-to-protect-the-worlds-most-vulnerable-women-children-and-adolescents/
  
Article
The National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) is concerned about the rising number of measles cases in the country. This comes after a measles outbreak was declared in Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Gauteng, the Free State and the North West. The NICD’s Dr Michelle Groome said since last week, there have been 371 confirmed cases – with 140 of these in Limpopo.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://ewn.co.za/2023/01/16/nicd-worried-about-an-increase-in-measles-cases-in-sa
  
Article
About 800 to 1,000 children in South Africa are diagnosed with cancer every year. Hulisani Ravele interviewed, programme development manager, Adri Ludick, from the Childhood Cancer Foundation South Africa. The survival rate for children with cancer in South Africa is around 55%, with half of the total number of patients dying due to misdiagnosis. Ludick says that parents and primary caregivers should trust their instincts to spot the early signs of cancer in children.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AM702https://www.702.co.za/articles/464326/mom-you-know-your-child-a-guide-to-spotting-early-signs-of-childhood-cancer
  
Article
The UK government recently announced that it is partnering with German firm BioNTech to test vaccines for cancer and other diseases. The project aims to build on the mRNA vaccine technology that BioNTech became famous for developing, and which has been so successful at preventing serious illness and death from COVID. The goal of this new project is to deliver 10,000 personalised therapies to UK patients by 2030. With trials potentially starting as soon as this autumn.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMMarketScreenerhttps://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/BIONTECH-SE-66771992/news/Anglia-Ruskin-University-ARU-The-science-behind-the-new-mRNA-cancer-vaccines-42741915/
  
Article
Africa houses 1.2 billion people, about 11% of the global population. Along with this population burden, the continent also bears a disproportionate burden of disease, with 60% of Africans living with HIV/AIDS, and more than 90% of the annual global malaria cases being in Africa. The continent is also afflicted by significant infectious diseases and increasing non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Africa has faced significant public health challenges due to insufficient access to quality, safe, efficacious, and affordable medical products over the years. In 2022, some children reportedly lost their lives from acute kidney injury in Gambia after ingesting imported adulterated cough syrups. Events such as these are not just shocking, but also distressing knowing they could have been easily avoided.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMIQVIAhttps://www.iqvia.com/locations/middle-east-and-africa/blogs/2023/01/getting-quality-medicines-to-patients-faster-in-africa-how-to-solve-for-access-issues
  
Article
HIV is now 40-plus years since emerging as a global health problem, but complacency and reduced funding continue to make it an ‘unfinished agenda’ Winnie Sseruma, an activist, and Linda Bakker, a researcher said recently. Years since first recognized as a global health threat, those first diagnosed with the problem have now aged with it and now live with a number of co-morbidities. “The experience and lessons we have learned over the years is that time to an integrated approach in HIV care was now. There is a need to position HIV within the broader global health agenda given,” said Linda.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMAfrica Science Newshttps://africasciencenews.org/health/15456/
  
Article
With successful treatment, HIV has become a chronic health condition which can be managed with life-long care. Treatment reduces the amounts of HIV in the blood to an undetectable level and most people with the infection who take their medication live as long as people without HIV. While there have been successful developments in treating the virus, it's important to understand how it may impact the long-term cognitive function of those aging with HIV.
2023-01-162023-01-26 12:00 AMMedical X presshttps://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-01-rapid-cognitive-decline-uncommon-aging.html
  
Article
CLAIM: Magic Johnson contracted HIV from a contaminated Hepatitis B vaccine as part of a study run by Dr. Anthony Fauci decades ago. AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. The Lakers legend has said he believes he contracted the virus from unprotected sex. Johnson didn’t comment on the latest claims, but in the past has credited Fauci, who had been a leading researcher when AIDS first emerged, with helping him cope with his diagnosis, which prompted him to retire from the NBA. THE FACTS: Social media users are sharing a video claiming that contaminated vaccines were the reason the Hall of Fame basketball player contracted HIV, the virus that causes the immune system-damaging disease AIDS.
2023-01-142023-01-26 12:00 AMAP Newshttps://apnews.com/article/fact-check-HIV-AIDS-magic-johnson-vaccine-954909605977
  
Article
Screening HIV-positive individuals for early signs of anal cancer may lead to an earlier diagnosis and better survival, according to an observational Dutch cohort study. Among men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV, anal cancer-related mortality was 3.7% in those who had been screened in the Netherlands compared with 24.0% in those who had not been screened (P=0.023), reported Jan Prins, PhD, of the University of Amsterdam, and colleagues.
2023-01-132023-01-26 12:00 AMMedPage Todayhttps://www.medpagetoday.com/hivaids/hivaids/102643
  
Article
There is no clear path to test the three candidate vaccines developed to combat the Ebola Sudan strain now that Uganda’s outbreak is over. The three candidate vaccines – produced by IAVI (called SUDV), Sabin (ChAD3) and Oxford (ChAdOx1) – were delivered to Uganda with much fanfare in mid-December. But scientists attending a meeting convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) on Thursday could not agree on how to test them now, and discussed options including regulatory approval based on animal-only studies and “immunobridging”.
https://healthpolicy-watch.news/with-end-of-uganda-outbreak-there-is-no-clear-path-to-test-the-ebola-sudan-candidate-vaccines/
WHO updates COVID-19 guidelines on masks, treatments and patient care
World Health Organization | 13 January 2023
WHO has updated its guidelines on mask wearing in community settings, COVID-19 treatments, and clinical management. This is part of a continuous process of reviewing such materials, working with guideline development groups composed of independent, international experts who consider the latest available evidence and the changing epidemiology.
https://www.who.int/news/item/13-01-2023-who-updates-covid-19-guidelines-on-masks--treatments-and-patient-care
Close to one billion people globally are served by health-care facilities with no electricity access or with unreliable electricity
2023-01-132023-01-26 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/with-end-of-uganda-outbreak-there-is-no-clear-path-to-test-the-ebola-sudan-candidate-vaccines/
  
Article
The National Cancer Strategic Framework states that cancer in South Africa is a growing national health and socio-economic concern. It has been acknowledged that it is avoidable through immunisation, dietary changes, early discovery, and prompt treatment, alleviating needless suffering.
2023-01-122023-01-18 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/health/lung-cancer-mortality-in-south-africa-is-increasing-due-to-lack-of-knowledge-and-accessibility-782510ea-691c-4444-92ce-d68eb36f6287
  
Article
Many episodes of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can be initially symptom free. For instance, the germs that cause syphilis can initially cause a small painless sore or lesion. If this occurs inside the ano-genital tract or mouth, it can go unnoticed. The germs that cause syphilis then spread further in the body to vital organs and tissues such as the eyes, brain, heart and blood vessels, kidneys, liver and bones. Eventually, this can lead to serious complications in the affected person and in the fetus during pregnancy. In the vast majority of people, a course of treatment can cure syphilis and other STIs. However, reinfection with syphilis (and other STIs) can occur in the future, so some sexually active people require frequent testing for STIs, including syphilis.
2023-01-122023-01-26 12:00 AMCatiehttps://www.catie.ca/catie-news/study-finds-some-people-with-hiv-are-at-greater-risk-for-stis
  
Article
After Boitumelo gave birth she decided not to go back to school. She assumed that, because she was now a mother, she would be barred from returning. Then she had a surprising interaction:

They [school] were like, why did you not come back [to school], do you attend [school] elsewhere? I was like, no, I have a child. Then they were like, on January we need you here, this school is empty without you, and that gave me the confidence of saying, oh I must go back to school.

In fact, Boitumelo had the right, under South African law, to continue her schooling through and after her pregnancy – without fear of stigma or discrimination.
2023-01-122023-01-26 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/pregnant-learners-in-south-africa-need-creches-and-compassion-to-keep-them-in-school-195022
  
Article
When Gigi D'Agostino, the world-famous DJ, remastered Ivan Gough's song, In my mind, it swept through nightclubs and beaches, igniting youth. The hypnotic refrain, "In my mind, in my head, this is where we all came from, the dreams we have, the love we share, this is what we're waiting for", spoke of a generation seeking insight and freedom from the many challenges they face. In 2021, UNICEF South Africa released the findings of a U-Report poll in which 5 500 youth up to the age of 24 were surveyed. The results were shocking. Some 65% of youth indicated that they had some form of mental health issue, but had not sought help for it. The U-Report findings were released at the start of mental health awareness month in South Africa alongside the launch of the #OnMyMind campaign and UNICEF's global flagship report, The State of the World's Children 2021; On My Mind: promoting, protecting and caring for children's mental health.
2023-01-112023-01-18 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=154
  
Article
There aren’t enough doctors working in South Africa’s rural areas. To fix this, the Umthombo Youth Development Foundation has trained hundreds of health workers, the majority of whom end up working in the country’s far-flung areas. Now, the project’s success is being undermined by hiring freezes as provincial health departments battle to balance a shrinking public purse and increasing salaries. In the fourth episode of Health Beat, our Mia Malan asks the head of the National Health Insurance, Nicholas Crisp, whether the scheme could solve the problem.
2023-01-112023-01-18 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/bhekisisa-tv/2023-01-11-health-beat-4-can-national-health-insurance-fix-sas-rural-doctor-dilemma/
  
Article
Auto-injecting blood sugar trackers will be handed to more than 100,000 diabetics in England under an NHS scheme. The new body-worn monitors, likened to an artificial pancreas, pump insulin into the body whenever it is required. The hybrid closed-loop monitors will help patients manage blood sugar levels without having to monitor their levels manually. It means type 1 diabetics won't need continuous glucose monitors or finger-prick tests to check their levels - nor daily insulin injections to treat the disease.
2023-01-102023-01-18 12:00 AMSky Newshttps://news.sky.com/story/diabetics-to-get-artificial-pancreas-on-nhs-which-injects-insulin-via-body-worn-tracker-12783422
  
Article
Mpox cases have declined dramatically, but people living with HIV remain at higher risk. Monkeypox—recently renamed mpox—was one of the biggest health stories of 2022. Historically a rare disease mostly seen in Central and West Africa, a new outbreak emerged in London in May. Most cases were among men who have sex with men, suggesting sexual transmission. Before long, mpox skyrocketed in cities across Europe and the United States. New cases have since declined dramatically, but major disparities remain, including a high proportion of cases among people living with HIV.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMPOZhttps://www.poz.com/article/monkeypox-hiv
  
Article
In her article in The New Yorker, "Climate Change From A to Z: The stories we tell ourselves about the future", Elizabeth Kolbert writes of the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius, who, on the eve of the 20th century, constructed the world's first climate model. According to his scarily accurate calculation, if the amount of carbon dioxide in the air were to double, global temperatures would rise between three and four degrees Celsius – pretty close to the 2.5 to four-degree increase predicted by the vastly more advanced climate models of today.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMBizCommunityhttps://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/733/234777.html
  
Article
The National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) has urged parents to get their children vaccinated after a measles outbreak that has spread to five provinces in fewer than two months, with data revealing dismal vaccination rates. The first outbreak was confirmed in Limpopo in October 2022.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2023-01-09-measles-outbreaks-confirmed-in-five-provinces-with-test-positivity-rate-skyrocketing/
  
Article
The key to ending Aids is to end inequality, and countries most affected by the disease must lead the effort against the disease by closing the economic gap. Inequality, compounded by stigmatisation if not, criminalisation, is making it impossible for many people at risk of contracting HIV, as well as those living with the disease, to receive the quality care they need.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMBangkok Posthttps://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opinion/2478084/a-model-for-hiv-management
  
Article
About 38 million people around the world are living with HIV. About 70% of them live in Africa. This shows that there is no solution to the AIDS pandemic without a solution in Africa. In 2021, there were 1.5 million new cases of HIV—just over 4,000 cases per day around the world. At the same time, close to 700,000 people died. The big challenge is to address the dual realities of people still dying from HIV in large numbers, and the large numbers of new infections. The upside is that there is a clear plan with clear goals on how to address this.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMMedical Xpresshttps://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-01-hiv-killer-africa-medical-breakthroughshow.html
  
Article
A new study conducted by UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers shows an alarming number of California women 65 and older are facing late-stage cervical cancer diagnoses and dying from the disease. This is despite guidelines that recommend most women stop screening for cervical cancer at this age. “Our findings highlight the need to better understand how current screening guidelines might be failing women 65 and over,” the study’s lead author, UC Davis senior statistician Julianne Cooley, said.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMEurekAlert!https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/976061
  
Article
The Adherence Connection for Counseling, Education, and Support (ACCESS) peer-led, mobile health cognitive behavioral antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence intervention improves adherence to ART for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with HIV infection, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in AIDS and Behavior. Ann-Margaret Dunn Navarra, Ph.D., from the Rory Myers College of Nursing at New York University in New York City, and colleagues developed and tested the ACCESS peer-led, mobile health cognitive behavioral ART adherence intervention. HIV-positive AYA, aged 16 to 29 years, with unsuppressed plasma HIV RNA were eligible for the five-session intervention. Sixteen participants received 78 peer-led remote videoconferencing sessions.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMMedical Xpress https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-01-cognitive-behavioral-intervention-ups-antiretroviral.html
  
Article
The research, published in The Lancet Public Health, brought together a variety of different types of evidence -- including previous studies, new data on women's preferences, and case studies of existing practice across the globe -- to develop a model, which could be used to help design services in a way that better meets the needs of women and their partners. Researchers found that, currently, health services only view women to either be pregnant or not pregnant, and do not consider their health in the in-between stage -- before trying to conceive. This can have an important influence on both their chances of becoming pregnant and of having a healthy pregnancy as well as affect their own health in the short and long term.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMScience Dailyhttps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2023/01/230109112752.htm
  
Article
A high-level council to govern global health emergencies, made up of heads of state and other international leaders, is one of the proposals to be discussed by the World Health Organization (WHO) this year. It is the first of 10 proposals to strengthen the WHO’s response to health emergencies put forward by WHO Director General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, in a document published late last week. The proposals, distilled from the numerous proposals from member states and global health in light of COVID-19, will be considered by the body’s executive board meeting from 30 January to 7 February.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMHealth Policy Watchhttps://healthpolicy-watch.news/who-proposes-high-level-global-council-to-guide-future-health-emergencies/
  
Article
Scientists have mapped the cellular changes linked to endometriosis to help improve therapeutic options for the millions of women affected by the disease. Roughly 1 in 10 women are affected by the condition, which is characterised by cells similar to those lining the uterus growing elsewhere in the body – most commonly on the ovaries, fallopian tubes and in the abdominal cavity. Patients with the disorder can experience chronic pain, infertility, headaches and fatigue, as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction. Despite it being so common, it takes an average of seven to eight years to be diagnosed with endometriosis because it is so poorly understood.
2023-01-092023-01-18 12:00 AMThe Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/society/2023/jan/09/scientists-map-cellular-changes-linked-to-endometriosis
  
Article
A large study of patients seen at sexual health clinics in London found low numbers of mpox cases after vaccination with one dose of modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA-BN) vaccine. A team from the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) reported their findings this week in BMJ Sexually Transmitted Diseases. In other research developments, a team led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today reported that though cisgender women only made up less than 3% of US mpox cases, Black and Hispanic patients were disproportionately affected, similar to the pattern seen in men.
2023-01-072023-01-18 12:00 AMCIDRAPhttps://www.cidrap.umn.edu/mpox/study-finds-few-mpox-infections-after-one-vaccine-dose
  
Article
Over 100 teenage mothers in South Africa gave birth on Christmas and New Year’s Day this year. This figure from the National Health Department has sounded the alarm for local healthcare authorities. Experts are debating whether poverty and a lack of sex education from an early age could be contributing factors to the country’s high teenage pregnancy rate. The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Social Development says teenage pregnancy cannot be viewed as isolation from the challenges of poverty and early school dropouts among pregnant teenagers.
2023-01-052023-01-18 12:00 AMSABC Newshttps://www.sabcnews.com/sabcnews/health-department-concerns-about-south-africas-high-teen-pregnancy-rate/
  
Article
Women who experience recent intimate partner violence (IPV) are three times more likely to contract HIV, according to a new study led by McGill University researchers. In regions like Sub-Saharan Africa, women face an intersecting epidemic of intimate partner violence and HIV. "Sub-Saharan Africa is among one of the regions in the world with the highest prevalence of both IPV and HIV. We wanted to examine the effects of intimate partner violence on recent HIV infections and women's access to HIV care in this region," he says.
2023-01-052023-01-18 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Sciencehttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20230105/Study-finds-higher-prevalence-of-HIV-among-women-experiencing-intimate-partner-violence.aspx
  
Article
An experimental vaccine designed to prevent HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) has produced promising results in a preliminary study involving a small group of volunteers. The vaccine candidate showed success in stimulating production of rare immune cells needed to start the process of generating antibodies against the fast-mutating virus. As detailed December 2 in the journal Science, the treatment produced a broad neutralizing antibody response in 35 of 36 (97 percent) of recipients who received two vaccine doses eight weeks apart. “With our many collaborators on the study team, we showed that vaccines can be designed to stimulate rare immune cells with specific properties, and this targeted stimulation can be very efficient in humans,” said William Schief, PhD, a study author and immunologist at Scripps Research, in La Jolla, California, in a press release.
2022-12-072022-12-09 12:00 AMEveryday Healthhttps://www.everydayhealth.com/hiv-aids/hiv-vaccine-candidate-prompts-immune-response-in-early-human-trials/
  
Article
It doesn’t matter whether they’re positive or negative, easy or difficult, sexual or not, they all have a powerful impact on us. We are taught very different things about sex. For many people, sex education focuses on the moral aspects of sex or the repercussions of unprotected sex, such as unwanted pregnancies, STIs or HIV. What far too many of us aren’t taught about is relationships and sex, as well as the physical and emotional side of sex. Zonja Penzhorn, head of communications at Shout-It-Now, says too few of us are taught that any relationship with another person should leave you feeling good about yourself; that you can and should walk away if a situation makes you uncomfortable; and that relationships should be a complement to your life, not a complication.
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/lifestyle/health/if-we-want-hiv-vulnerable-group-to-listen-we-must-understand-their-wants-and-desires-and-speak-to-them-not-at-them-8cc62629-be94-4ad3-bec0-9cfc1aae66af
  
Article
Busisiwe Beko, from Khayelitsha in the Western Cape, was diagnosed with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) while she was pregnant. She remembers it as a very difficult period in her life. “The time that I was diagnosed with TB was the time that I found out I had HIV. In that period, it was really a struggle for me, because I also found out I was pregnant. It was so unfortunate that I couldn’t produce sputum so that I could be tested for TB. That was the first challenge for me,” says Beko, who now works for Doctors Without Borders (MSF). Beko shared her experience during a session on maternal TB at the recent Union World Conference on Lung Health.
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/12/06/experts-call-for-better-screening-and-treatment-of-tb-during-pregnancy/
  
Article
The UNAIDS World Aids Day report shows that only urgent action to tackle inequalities can get the world’s Aids response on track. At a United Nations (UN) General Assembly High-Level Meeting on Aids held in New York in June last year, member states adopted a political declaration to get the world on track to end Aids as a public health threat by 2030.
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMPeople’s Posthttps://www.news24.com/news24/community-newspaper/peoples-post/unaids-world-aids-day-report-finds-we-are-leaving-children-behind-20221206
  
Article
Cancer is not one illness — there are at least 100 different forms of the disease — and cancer in children is not the same as in adults, and often evolves through a completely different biological pathway. Yet almost all the drugs currently used to treat tumours in children have been developed and tested based on how cancer behaves in adults.
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-11505561/Could-new-treatments-mean-children-wont-need-hand-cancer-drugs-adults.html
  
Article
Drug companies must make fundamental changes to their core business to address Research and Development (R&D) gaps and access to existing medicines for women’s sexual and reproductive health in lower-income countries, global health equity advocates urge. Despite progress in women’s health and rights in the last 50 years, stark inequalities remain in access to contraceptives, health services to support safe pregnancy and birth, and treatment of sexual and reproductive diseases, the Access to Medicine Foundation highlights in a special report presented to industry representatives last week.
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/12/06/drug-companies-must-address-chronic-neglect-of-women/
  
Article
A young child has died after being diagnosed with Strep A - the eighth to have been killed by the bacterial infection in recent weeks. The latest victim was a pupil at Morelands Primary School in Waterlooville, Hampshire. An invasive form of the Strep A bacterial infection has spread across the UK in recent months, with No 10 warning parents to be "on the lookout" for symptoms.
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMSky Newshttps://news.sky.com/story/eighth-child-dies-after-strep-a-infection-as-parents-warned-to-watch-out-for-symptoms-12762375
  
Article
At night, Palesa Mgazi*, a doctor at Lenasia South District Hospital in the south of Johannesburg, regularly puts patients on drips in complete darkness. She has to think on her feet — and fast. There’s no beeping from machines that check vital signs in the emergency department where she works — because they don’t work without electricity. Many patients coming through the doors need to be hooked up to machines that monitor their body temperature, pulse rate, blood pressure and oxygen levels. Others need to be put onto a ventilator (a machine that breathes for them).
2022-12-062022-12-09 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/features/2022-12-06-blood-on-the-floor-drips-in-the-dark-johannesburg-is-crumbling-heres-how-it-affects-hospitals/
  
Article
The people of Inanda, eThekwini District and the surrounding areas were advised to be always aware that Aids is still a reality, and that it kills. These warning words were echoed by Aids activist Phume Ngcobo as she addressed the crowd gathered at JL Dube Sports field in Inanda on Sunday.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/dailynews/news/world-aids-day-aids-is-still-a-reality-and-it-kills-139897ed-a091-46dd-92b0-1e826ba57262
  
Article
Eswatini (formerly Swaziland), a tiny country of just over a million people in Southern Africa, has one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world. As of 2021, UNAIDS reported that 27.9% of people aged 15-49 within the country are living with the virus. According to the Global Fund―an international financing partnership that works to eliminate HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria―63% of the people living with HIV (PLWH) in the country are women, who continue to be disproportionately affected by the virus. For example, the fund reported that in 2020, women and girls accounted for 63% of all new HIV diagnoses.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMThe Bodyhttps://www.thebody.com/article/cultural-barriers-women-eswatini-hiv-care
  
Article
Europe has seen a rise in undiagnosed HIV infections — the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reported that between at least 2018 to 2021, there have been more HIV infections than diagnoses.
The full report showed that testing rates fell during the COVID-19 pandemic and has hindered progress toward eliminating new HIV transmissions by 2030.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMPlushttps://www.hivplusmag.com/news/2022/12/05/hiv-catastrophe-coming-europe
  
Article
PEPFAR – or the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief – was conceptualized by Dr. Anthony Fauci in 2003 after a White House meeting with then President George W. Bush who challenged him to think big. Over the last twenty years, PEPFAR has invested more than $100 billion in the global HIV/AIDS response, effectively saving 25 million lives, preventing millions of new HIV infections, and serving as a platform that has helped to combat avian flu, Ebola, and – more recently – COVID-19.  Growing up in the 80s and 90s, I heard horrifying stories of kids losing their parents and it made such an impact that once I completed my Epidemic Intelligence Service Training at the CDC in 2008, I began my career working in PEPFAR, including roles at the CDC and USAID. 
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMProject Hopehttps://www.projecthope.org/health-expert-voices-reflections-20th-anniversary-pepfar/12/2022/
  
Article
SA’s biggest pharmaceutical manufacturer Aspen Pharmacare has urged ViiV Healthcare to licence African generic drug makers to produce cheap copies of its long-acting cabotegravir injection, which offers protection against HIV. The debate about access to cabotegravir has taken on new impetus after the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority (Sahpra) announced it had registered the drug, administered every two months, for preventing HIV infection.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMBusiness Day https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/health/2022-12-05-aspen-urges-viiv-to-licence-injectable-hiv-drug-to-african-generic-manufacturers/
  
Article
South Africa’s medicine regulator, Sahpra, has registered CAB-LA, a new anti-HIV jab. But for how much will drugmaker ViiV Healthcare sell it to the government? The Bhekisisa Centre for Health Journalism asked them in their TV programme Health Beat. Bhekisisa editor-in-chief Mia Malan spoke to Dr Kimberly Smith, head of research and development at ViiV Healthcare, about the drug's pricing, clinical trials and availability.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMTimes Livehttps://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2022-12-05-watch-goal-is-to-get-price-as-low-as-possible-says-hiv-jab-producer-as-sahpra-registers-drug/
  
Article
As we join civil society, the media and government during the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence campaign, not forgetting LGBTQIA+ people, we are reflecting on our role in perpetuating this social ill. At the second Presidential Summit on gender-based violence and Femicide (GBVF), held on 1 and 2 November, President Cyril Ramaphosa committed to eradicating this violence and reported on the steps taken to achieve this. We note that there is not much effort being put into investigating the unique experiences of people with disabilities, sex workers, LGBTQIA+ people and migrants, who are disproportionately affected by GBVF.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMMail & Guardianhttps://mg.co.za/opinion/2022-12-05-intersectional-approach-needed-to-end-gender-based-violence-and-femicide/
  
Article
While the Free State health department is denying that clinics in the province are experiencing stockouts of antiretroviral medicines, some healthcare users and HIV activists working in communities claim otherwise. The department does however acknowledge that some people are given only a two-week supply at a time.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-12-05-some-free-state-patients-only-given-lifesaving-antiretrovirals-for-two-weeks-at-a-time/
  
Article
What does it feel like to be diagnosed with diabetes? And is there a way to turn this kind of diagnosis into something positive? For Nicholas Caracandas, the answer was learning to own it as part of his identity. After being diagnosed with Type I Diabetes about 30 years ago, he figured out how to help other T1Ds achieve their exercise and nutrition goals and ultimately self-manage their diabetes. Nicholas shared his insights with Longevity for Wellness Wednesday.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMLongevityhttps://longevitylive.com/wellness/turning-diabetes-diagnosis-success/
  
Article
A clinic in Mathibestad in the North West is on the verge of collapse while it battles to keep its lights on during load shedding, leaving patients in need of emergency care stranded. The 24-hour clinic services more than five villages and struggles to stay open during the ongoing blackouts. Up to six hours are lost daily. Mantwa Gobene was turned away from the clinic while in labour. The 25-year-old had no referral letter from the Jubilee District Hospital in Hammanskraal in Gauteng. Once she arrived at the clinic, she was told there was no generator and couldn’t be admitted.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/12/05/load-shedding-leaves-woman-in-labour-stranded/
  
Article
Take a moment to think about the people in your life and the types of relationships you have. The platonic relationship with your friend, the sexual relationship with your partner, and the working relationship with your colleague. Relationships come in all shapes and sizes. They can be positive or negative, difficult or easy, and involve sex or not – but all of them have a powerful impact on us. Many of us are taught very different things about sex at home, at school, through the media and other venues. Still, for many people, that sex education focuses on the moral aspects of sex or the repercussions of unprotected sex like unwanted pregnancies, STIs or HIV. What far too many of us aren’t taught about are relationships and sex.
2022-12-052022-12-09 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/12/05/sex-and-relationships-its-time-to-simplify-the-talk/
  
Article
Well-known HIV activist, Nozi Qamngana-Mayaba, is on a mission to destroy the negative perceptions people may have about the virus. Taking to the socials, the author of two books, entitled I Am Still Zuri and I Am Still Me, shared that she’s been living with HIV for the last nine years and hasn’t allowed the virus to change the person she is.
2022-12-042022-12-09 12:00 AMBrieflyhttps://briefly.co.za/people/women/147930-inspiring-activist-living-hiv-9-years-shares-glowing-photo-smashes-stigma-inspires-mzansi/
  
Article
A small, phase 1 trial testing a new HIV vaccine delivered positive results in 97 percent of recipients. The vaccine was created from an engineered version of a protein within the HIV virus. This particle, according to an article on Science Alert, was designed to get the body ready to produce the neutralizing antibodies thought to be critical for HIV immunity. Forty-eight participants received either the vaccine or a placebo, while 35 of the 36 dosed with the vaccine showed an activation of antibody precursor B cells that could pave the way to immunity.
2022-12-032022-12-09 12:00 AMPlushttps://www.hivplusmag.com/news/2022/12/03/new-hiv-vaccine-trial-shows-extreme-promise
  
Article
A new report by the World Health Organization shows evidence of a higher risk of premature death and illness among many persons with disabilities compared to others in the society. The Global report on health equity for persons with disabilities published today shows that because of the systemic and persistent health inequities, many persons with disabilities face the risk of dying much earlier—even up to 20 years earlier—than persons without disabilities. They have an increased risk of developing chronic conditions, with up to double the risk of asthma, depression, diabetes, obesity, oral diseases, and stroke.  Many of the differences in health outcomes cannot be explained by the underlying health condition or impairment, but by avoidable, unfair and unjust factors.
2022-12-022022-12-09 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/02-12-2022-health-inequities-lead-to-early-death-in-many-persons-with-disabilities
  
Article
Measles vaccination rates fell to the lowest level in more than a decade during the COVID-19 pandemic, complicating efforts to prevent outbreaks, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Globally, a record high of nearly 40 million children missed a measles vaccine dose last year, including 25 million kids who didn’t get the first of two recommended doses, and an additional 14.7 million who missed their second dose, according to the report, which was issued jointly with the World Health Organization (WHO) November 23. “The record number of children under-immunized and susceptible to measles shows the profound damage immunization systems have sustained during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said the CDC's director, Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH, in the report.
2022-12-022022-12-09 12:00 AMEveryday Healthhttps://www.everydayhealth.com/measles/measles-outbreak-risk-rising-as-vaccination-rates-drop-cdc-says/
  
Article
South Africa had 200,000 new HIV infections in 2021, according to UNAids. A new injection called CAB-LA could be a game-changer
2022-12-012022-12-02 12:00 AMBusinessLIVEhttps://www.businesslive.co.za/fm/fm-fox/2022-12-01-meet-the-first-south-african-women-to-get-the-anti-hiv-jab/
  
Article
South Africa’s medicines regulator, Sahpra, will announce a decision on the approval of the new HIV prevention jab, CAB-LA, “within days”. The shot is taken every two months and virtually wipes out someone’s chances of contracting HIV through sex. The health department says, if Sahpra approves the shot, it could start rolling out the jab on a large scale within nine months — but that depends on the price that the drugmaker will sell it at. We travelled to Crossroads near Cape Town to speak to young women in a CAB-LA trial who have been using the injection for the past six months.
2022-12-012022-12-02 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/health/if-the-price-is-right-the-anti-hiv-jab-could-be-in-sa-clinics-by-august-2023-20221201
  
Article
Cabotegravir is still unaffordable after two years. In 2020, pharmaceutical company ViiV Healthcare announced that a bimonthly injection of its new drug, cabotegravir, prevents HIV infection. More than two years later, the drug is still unaffordable in countries where HIV is highly prevalent.
Local medicines manufacturer Aspen Pharmacare says that licences should be given to African producers so that cabotegravir can be made more affordable and accessible.
2022-12-012022-12-02 12:00 AMAll Africahttps://allafrica.com/stories/202212010110.html
  
Article
Global leaders have pledged to end new Aids infections by 2030, but a recent report by the United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) says inequalities and harmful gender norms are standing in the way. The 'Dangerous Inequalities' report released in commemoration of Aids Day, which is observed worldwide on 1 December, says infection rates in young women aged between 15 and 24 were worrying. "The world will not be able to defeat Aids while reinforcing patriarchy. We need to address the intersecting inequalities women face. In areas of high HIV burden, women subjected to intimate partner violence face up to a 50% higher chance of acquiring HIV," said UNAIDS executive director Winnie Byanyima.
2022-12-012022-12-02 12:00 AMNews24https://www.news24.com/news24/health/inequalities-and-harmful-gender-norms-need-to-end-in-order-to-stop-new-hiv-infections-report-20221201
  
Article
As South Africa observes World Aids Day today the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) said it was concerned about the high number of young people, including those in high school, who were getting infected with HIV/Aids.
2022-12-012022-12-02 12:00 AMIOL newshttps://www.iol.co.za/the-star/news/tac-concerned-about-hiv-infection-rate-among-young-people-in-high-school-84a8f340-8056-4c4c-939b-18c359f65561
  
Article
A new landmark study finds that Canada's process of mandatory HIV screening of migrants is out of step with the OECD and ignores the government's own policy on medical admissibility to Canada. Screening Out, a first-of-its-kind study prepared as a book by Professor Laura Bisaillon, University of Toronto, reveals major problems and gaps in Canada's immigration policy, practice, and process, including exposing the private health information of thousands of applicants to misuse and prejudice. Under Canada's official policy, HIV is not used to discriminate or impede a person's immigration. Yet, migrant applicants are required to undergo mandatory HIV screening by government appointed doctors. Test results are shared with bureaucrats who use HIV status to determine if and on what basis an applicant is 'normal' enough to settle here.
2022-11-302022-12-02 12:00 AMAidsmaphttps://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-11-mandatory-hiv-medical-exclude-abnormal.html
  
Article
Soon after cholesterol and fat start depositing on the lining of the blood vessels that supply your heart, the smooth muscle cells that give the blood vessels strength and flexibility start to get bigger and multiply. While scientists studying the phenomenon suspect these vascular smooth muscle cells are trying to help, this atypical behavior for these strong cells instead contributes to coronary artery disease, the most common type of heart disease in the United States.
2022-11-292022-12-02 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Science https://www.news-medical.net/news/20221129/Scientists-report-new-target-to-combat-coronary-artery-disease.aspx
  
Article
“We missed the 2020 targets for treatment, prevention of vertical transmission and prevention generally – and we have been set back by Covid-19 and now also have the uncertain impact of the Ukrainian war so not only do we need to up our game to get on with the 2025 and 2030 targets but we have also got some catch-up to do”. This is how a leading HIV/Aids researcher and Chief Operating Officer of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation, Linda- Gail Bekker, summed up South Africa’s ongoing struggle against the scourge.
2022-11-292022-12-02 12:00 AMPeople’s Posthttps://www.news24.com/news24/community-newspaper/peoples-post/hivaids-struggle-continues-says-desmond-tutu-hiv-foundations-chief-20221129
  
Article
The study shows how gender inequalities and harmful gender norms are blocking the end of the AIDS pandemic, with rising new infections and continuing deaths in many parts of the planet. Inequalities will prevent the world from meeting agreed global targets on AIDS, but a “feminist route map” can get countries back on track, the UN agency leading the fight against the disease said in a report published on Tuesday. Last year, 650 000 people died from AIDS and 1.5 million acquired HIV, the virus that causes the disease. “The world will not be able defeat AIDS while reinforcing patriarchy,” said Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS, who called for addressing the intersecting inequalities that women face. “The only effective route map to ending AIDS, achieving the sustainable development goals and ensuring health, rights and shared prosperity, is a feminist route map,” she said. “Women’s rights organizations and movements are already on the frontlines doing this bold work. Leaders need to support them and learn from them.”
2022-11-292022-12-02 12:00 AMUnited Nationshttps://news.un.org/en/story/2022/11/1131122
  
Article
On December 12, Ntimbwe Munongo Mpamba will celebrate his fortieth birthday with chocolate cake in Northgate, Johannesburg. Usually, his diet consists of more “bitter” than sweet foods – plenty of kale, spinach, cayenne pepper, ginger, and garlic, he tells Spotlight.
2022-11-292022-12-02 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/11/29/almost-40-years-with-hiv-from-dead-man-walking-to-hiv-awareness-champion/
  
Article
Inequalities obstruct the end of the Aids epidemic after a new UNAIDs report revealed that adults and children are being denied treatment. Over half of these kids are living on lifesaving medicines. The report titled ‘Dangerous Inequalities’ reveals that based on current trends, the world will not meet agreed global targets on Aids, and millions of lives are at stake. It also shows that only urgent action can get the world’s Aids response on track.
2022-11-292022-12-02 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/11/29/inequalities-standing-in-the-way-of-global-aids-targets/
  
Article
Between April 2020 and September 2022, 988 women were killed in domestic violence incidents in South Africa, police data shows. In about the same period, the government achieved just over a fifth of the targets in its action plan to curb gender-based violence and femicide (GBVF), according to a report released at the second Presidential Summit on the matter held in Midrand in early November. Why?
2022-11-292022-12-02 12:00 AMBhekisisahttps://bhekisisa.org/health-news-south-africa/2022-11-29-good-bad-ugly-how-sas-fight-against-gbv-femicide-is-going/
  
Article
It goes without saying that women and children's health are a priority if we want to secure a bright future for all, especially in South Africa where cervical cancer, HIV and various non-communicable diseases remain a fundamental public health threat. Equally so, a dangerous gap exists where men's health and men's mental wellness are issues ignored or overlooked, compromising health efforts overall. Not addressing men's health issues has often been labelled as the cause, for instance, for movements such as the global 16 Days of Activism for No Violence against Women and Children Campaign. The Health Systems Trust was again invited to participate as a guest speaker at a critical event hosted by urban apartment dwelling enabler HOMii, honing in on the health and mental health issues faced by young men in support of National Men's Health Awareness Month.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMHealth Systems Trusthttps://www.hst.org.za/media/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=147
  
Article
As we approach World AIDS Day on 1 December, healthcare providers will be offering HIV screening and testing as part of a comprehensive health service. The theme for this year’s World AIDS Day is: “Equalise and Integrate to End AIDS”. One aspect in which more equality is arguably needed is between the quality of HIV testing services and aiming to test as many people as possible.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMSpotlighthttps://www.spotlightnsp.co.za/2022/11/28/opinion-keep-an-eye-on-quality-as-we-rush-to-test-people-for-hiv/
  
Article
Following a series of consultations with global experts, WHO will begin using a new preferred term “mpox” as a synonym for monkeypox. Both names will be used simultaneously for one year while “monkeypox” is phased out. When the outbreak of monkeypox expanded earlier this year, racist and stigmatizing language online, in other settings and in some communities was observed and reported to WHO. In several meetings, public and private, a number of individuals and countries raised concerns and asked WHO to propose a way forward to change the name.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMWorld Health Organization https://www.who.int/news/item/28-11-2022-who-recommends-new-name-for-monkeypox-disease
  
Article
Over 200,000 people out of 1.72 million living with HIV in the country do not use ARVs treatment, Manager for National AIDS Control Programme (NACP) Dr Anath Rwebembera has said. She made the revelation during the AIDS exhibition Day organised in Lindi Region ahead of World AIDS Day to be commemorated this Thursday. She said such people were at risk of getting serious illnesses as well as causing viral HIV transmission to other people. "If each and every person with HIV uses medication, he or she helps in preventing transmission of HIV to others as she/he stays healthy," she said.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMAll Africahttps://allafrica.com/stories/202211290051.html
  
Article
Around 110,000 children and adolescents (0-19 years) died from AIDs-related causes during 2021, according to the latest UNICEF global snapshot on children and HIV and AIDS. Meanwhile, another 310,000 were newly infected, bringing the total number of young people living with HIV to 2.7 million. Ahead of World AIDS Day, UNICEF warns that progress in HIV prevention and treatment for children, adolescents, and pregnant women has nearly flatlined over the past three years, with many regions still not at pre-COVID-19 service coverage. This comes on top of an existing and growing gap in treatment between children and adults.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMReliefwebhttps://reliefweb.int/report/world/hiv-prevention-and-treatment-progress-children-adolescents-and-pregnant-women-nearly-flat-over-past-few-years-unicef-enar
  
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While the world has focused on the COVID pandemic for nearly three years, less and less attention is being paid to HIV. However, HIV is still a global problem. In 2021, according to the United Nations, 38.4 million people were living with HIV, over 650,000 died from AIDS-related illnesses, and 1.5 million became newly infected. Nearly 70% of infections occur in key groups: sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, and transgender people and their sexual partners. Adolescent girls and young women in sub-Saharan Africa are another important group, with nearly 5,000 getting HIV every week.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMThe Conversationhttps://theconversation.com/hiv-prevention-new-injection-could-boost-the-fight-but-some-hurdles-remain-195305
  
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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected individuals display a wide range of clinical variations, from asymptomatic infection to lethal disease. In a recent study published on the bioRxiv* preprint server, and international team of researchers investigated the genetic, immunological, and evolutionary factors that determine the vast variability observed in clinical manifestations of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMNews Medical Life Sciencehttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20221128/How-SARS-CoV-2-immune-responses-vary-by-population-due-to-environmental-and-genetic-factors.aspx
  
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Extensive research is going into the prevention of HIV, PrEP and PEP are two HIV prevention mechanisms that scientists have come up with in the fight against HIV/AIDS. PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) is a short course of HIV medicines that can only be taken within 72 hours of having had a possible exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). You will need to take the course of a 3-drug antiretroviral regime for 28 days after exposure and you need to have tested HIV-negative before the medication can be administered.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMThe South Africanhttps://www.thesouthafrican.com/culture/lgbtqia/pep-everything-you-need-to-know-breaking-28-november-2022/
  
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World Aids Day is marked annually on 1 December. Herman Lategan looks back on some of the friends he lost during the Eighties and early Nineties, the initial stages of the pandemic. It’s not only his story, but a wider one about a time of fear, courage, love and loss.
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It was a warm evening on 2 October 1985. I was relaxing with some friends in a side-street restaurant in Cape Town, called Backstage. It was fashionable with the theatre crowds, thus the name.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMDaily Maverickhttps://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-11-28-remembering-those-we-loved-and-lost-to-the-aids-pandemic/
  
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Measles vaccinations have dropped sharply since the COVID pandemic, with about 25 million children missing their first dose of measles vaccine in 2021 and 14.7 million missing their second dose, the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a joint report. There were about 9 million measles cases that year and 128,000 deaths, with 22 nations reporting large outbreaks. Because of interruptions in vaccinations, “measles is an imminent threat in every region of the world,” the report said.
2022-11-282022-12-02 12:00 AMWebMDhttps://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20221128/forty-million-kids-missed-measles-vaccinations-report-says
  
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A species of malaria-carrying mosquito is spreading in Africa, where it could pose a "unique" threat to millions of city-dweller, reported AFP/RFI. The disease can cause fever, chills, and flu-like illness. If it is not treated, it can cause severe complications. This is important since Africa is where about 95% of the world's malaria deaths occur. Modeling research in 2020 found that if Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes spread widely in Africa, it would put more than 126 million people in 44 cities at risk of malaria.
2022-11-272022-12-02 12:00 AMVax before Travel https://www.vaxbeforetravel.com/2022/11/27/invasive-mosquito-spreading-malaria-africa
  
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What is RSV?
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of many viruses that causes infection of the ear, nose, throat and lungs. It infects people of all ages and can be found worldwide.
Who is at risk of RSV?
RSV is an important cause of lung infections in children under two years of age, and is the leading reason for hospital stays in children under one year of age (infants) in developed countries. Premature infants, adults above 65 years of age and those with chronic heart and lung conditions are at higher risk for severe disease and hospitalization.
2022-11-272022-12-02 12:00 AMallAfricahttps://allafrica.com/stories/202211280015.html
  
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The first to die of AIDS was his father, followed by his mother a year later. Like many South Africans in the mid-2000s, Ndumiso Gamede lost his parents in quick succession. Treatment has since stabilised the crisis, but the effects of this "lost generation" are still being felt. Now a rapper, the 28-year-old, who had to raise his younger brothers from the age of 13, shows pictures of his parents hanging on a dimly lit wall in the garage where he lives in the impoverished township of Vosloorus, about 30 km from Johannesburg.
2022-11-252022-12-02 12:00 AMAfrica Newshttps://www.africanews.com/2022/11/25/south-africas-aids-ravages-an-army-of-orphans/
  
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The eThekwini Municipality has intensified its programmes to work with structures to curb the spread of HIV/Aids and other related diseases. The eThekwini area is reported to have the highest rate of HIV/Aids and TB. This was revealed on November 23 at a mayoral engagement held with people living openly with HIV and Aids. The engagement was held at the Garden Court, Marine Parade in Durban Central.
2022-11-252022-12-02 12:00 AMBerea Mailhttps://bereamail.co.za/297579/ethekwini-municipality-hard-at-work-to-curb-spread-of-hiv-aids/
  
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On the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, UNAIDS is calling on the world to unite to end gender-based violence in all its forms and to challenge the gender inequities driving the HIV pandemic. “Violence against women and girls is our individual and collective shame—a gross violation of human rights happening on an epic scale,” said UNAIDS Executive Director, Winnie Byanyima. “This pandemic of violence continues to drive thousands of new HIV infections every week and is making the end of AIDS much harder to achieve. It is a systemic issue that must be addressed at every level of society.”
2022-11-252022-12-02 12:00 AMUNAIDShttps://www.unaids.org/en/resources/presscentre/pressreleaseandstatementarchive/2022/november/20221125_end-gender-based-violence
  
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Women’s participation in the economy took centre stage at the launch of this year’s 16 days of activism for no violence against women and children, which kicked off at the Nasrec Expo Centre in Johannesburg earlier this afternoon. Led by the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities, this year’s campaign highlights the importance of building women’s resilience by addressing barriers to socioeconomic opportunities and empowerment.
2022-11-252022-12-02 12:00 AMHealth-E News https://health-e.org.za/2022/11/25/16-days-of-activism-all-eyes-on-women-economic-empowerment/
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